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Baby Bun Not Pooping.

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Ryahnna

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I’m going to start this off by saying, I know that the best chances of this babies survival would be with a rehabber but I simply can’t get to the only one that is in my area. It’s way to far. I have experience with baby animals of many species and that is why I took this on.
My little Honey is about 4 weeks now I’d say. Maybe 3 1/2 weeks. She was being carried around by a crow, screaming. No mother insight. So I ran outside just as the crow dropped the baby for a second time (from what I had seen. the screaming had been going on for a while before I realized it wasn’t a bird) I scooped her up and checked for injuries and blood and saw none. I took her inside. Now, I did wait before running outside because I know mother rabbits will chase the attackers but she was nowhere to be seen, and I live in Seattle’s largest park so I had no idea where she came from.

Now the reason for this post, baby is doing great, active, eating, switching over to solid foods. But I haven’t noticed any poops in a few days. I didn’t stress about it the first day because she is still eating and acting normal. But should I be concerned? I was wiping her bottom after every feeding but I thought she was past that stage of needing the stimulation. Any thing I can give her high in fiber?
 

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Augustus&HazelGrace

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Timothy hay if she will eat it. I wouldn't recommend any other food as I hope you plan on releasing her after she is weaned. You don't want her used to domestic rabbit food if you are going to release her. If she won't eat hay try feeding her grass. Make sure it has no chemicals on it like if you spray your yard. and don't get grass that has been cut by the lawnmower. Just go and pull some or cut some with scissors.
 

Ryahnna

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Timothy hay if she will eat it. I wouldn't recommend any other food as I hope you plan on releasing her after she is weaned. You don't want her used to domestic rabbit food if you are going to release her. If she won't eat hay try feeding her grass. Make sure it has no chemicals on it like if you spray your yard. and don't get grass that has been cut by the lawnmower. Just go and pull some or cut some with scissors.
I have every intention on releasing her. She has quite a bit of hay with her currently.
I was thinking more of a veggie or fruit high in fiber that could help.
 

Augustus&HazelGrace

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No fruit. Too high in sugar. it would only make it worse. I'm not sure on any veggies or if even wild rabbits should have any.
 

Ryahnna

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No fruit. Too high in sugar. it would only make it worse. I'm not sure on any veggies or if even wild rabbits should have any.
From what I’ve read fruits and veggies are okay. Plus the rabbits in my area have access to 4 different garden patches, I’ve personally seen these wild rabbits eating from them. But I’ll definitely do more research.
 

Augustus&HazelGrace

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fruits and veggies should not be fed to rabbits that young. And what you see is probably the older rabbits. Young rabbits digestive system are not equipt to have fruits and veggies this young.
 

JBun

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I recommend getting it to a qulified rehabber if or when at all possible.

Aside from that, best foods would be teaching it to eat rabbit safe forage that it would find in the wild, starting one type of plant at a time, in small amounts and gradually increasing if no signs of digestive upset, before trying a new one. This link has info on the care of baby cottontails.
https://www.2ndchance.info/bunnies.htm
 

JBun

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If a rabbit is eating and drinking adequately, it follows that they would be pooping at some point. I'm wondering if the baby might be cleaning up (consuming) it's fecal poop before you can see it.
 

TreasuredFriend

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Thank you for not leaving her in the park to be torn apart by a crow or predator!!! Do you have access to clean wide-blade grass, or dandelion leaves? At the wildlife center, they provide romaine lettuce for their rehabbed cottontails. Something that cottontails are not readily going to nibble (or find, unless in someone's garden) once released. I can doublecheck with my friend who still rehabs juveniles and cares for infants and adults. Thanks for giving this crow-attacked little one a fighting chance.
 

Ryahnna

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She started pooping the day after I posted and hasn’t stopped!! I think I’m going to be releasing her this weekend. She’s big and healthy and eating well. But still very fearful of humans, which is perfect.

Now I’ll have space for a pet rabbit! (Hopefully a Netherlands’s dwarf!)
 

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