Netherland Dwarf

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Best pet rabbit breed

  • Netherland Dwarf

    Votes: 4 44.4%
  • Holland lop

    Votes: 4 44.4%
  • Meat bunny- California

    Votes: 1 11.1%

  • Total voters
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Jmaner

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My daughter brought home a bunny who was going to be sold for meat. We were not fans at first, but we have fallen in love with this- mini Rex- or at least that is what we are guessing. We’ve read that bunnies do best with friends. We are considering getting a bun friend. A breeder has Netherland dwarfs. We like the look, but have read that they can be skittish. The breeder also has Holland lops. We have even considered saving another meat bunny. Any thoughts?
 

Sam_

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Male Hollands are super mellow and sweet, while the females tend to be a bit more territorial.
 

Mac189

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I'd consider getting a similar-sized rabbit from a rescue! They will already be neutered and you can pick one of the opposite sex that is most likely to successfully bond! I have personally found that bigger rabbits tend to be kinder and gentler. I have had three pet rabbits that were intended for meat and they have all been some of the sweetest buns!
 

Blue eyes

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In order for two rabbits to bond, they both have to be fixed first -- before being introduced. Some rabbits will bond, some won't. I'm guessing that your new "meat" rabbit is not fixed. So you may want to first get your current rabbit fixed. If it is a male, it can take around 6 weeks after surgery for hormones to fully dissipate. Females don't take as long.

After he/she is fixed and healed, then it's a good idea to let the bunny choose his/her bondmate. This can be done by meeting other fixed rabbits at a rabbit rescue. This is how to pre-screen for potential compatibility.

Here's further info on bonding rabbits (since it isn't always so easy):
 

Hermelin

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Netherland dwarf are my favorite breed, the ones I have owned have never been skittish or nervous. All my netherland dwarf have been lovely bunnies with great personality and love people. I'm quite biased towards netherland dwarf rabbits but that's only because I have always had a good bond with them and a good experience owning them :oops:

But I would recommend adopting or taking a bunny that need a home instead, if you are thinking about rescuing a bunny then go for that instead.

You also need to have an extra plan if the bunnies won't bond with each other and make sure you have space. Bonding bunnies can go pretty wild if you are unlucky.
 

Jmaner

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I am considering rescuing another meat bunny, but I am scared because I’ve read that they can have serious health problems since nobody pays attention to their breeding
 

Hermelin

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I am considering rescuing another meat bunny, but I am scared because I’ve read that they can have serious health problems since nobody pays attention to their breeding
You will still help a bunny if you adopt one or take a bunny that's being rehomed, myself have taken bunnies that are unwanted or had quite the character which not many would want to handle, the reason why I have gotten bitten many times by a few of my bunnies while building their trust and bond 😅

There are many bunnies that being rehomed come from not good homes and can have traumas, some never being outside their cage. So you will still rescue a bunny and providing them a good home, you will need to wait until your girl is spayed and later get a buck that you will neuter or is already neutered.
 

Preitler

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I am considering rescuing another meat bunny, but I am scared because I’ve read that they can have serious health problems since nobody pays attention to their breeding

That's not quite right. Culling (removing from breeding) out any weak or sickly rabbits, or those with bad temperaments is a lot easier with meat rabbits, it's no fun working with skittish or mean animals, and health is a top priority.

In my opinion, random breeding because people think kits are cute, or accidential litters of pets are a little more prone to problems - for example, breeds with cute deformed skulls or lops need careful and vigilant breeders to avoid things like teeth issues, if you mix those randomly with other breeds you get random skull shapes and more risk for problems. Also, there's no culling for health or temperament.

Of course, as with pet breeds, it solely depends on the breeder if all that makes a difference. Good meat lines make great pets, they are bred to be stress resistant and healthy.

Getting a rabbit from a rescue or so has advantages, with kits you don't really know how the'll turn out.
 
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TreasuredFriend

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We've adopted (aggressive, bitey) rabbits on a euth list from shelters. There's a scar on my hand to remind me every day of the lunging, skin-biting dutch mix boy. A territorial unspayed female (or bitey male) from an abusive environment brings great joy when they learn to trust their humans and feel safe.

Every rescued rabbit is grateful that a human understood they are pets, not commodity flesh objects. A friend wanted to purchase several rabbits from a place that killed them frequently for stomach consumption, however the person refused to sell once he knew his hutch rabbits would be altered and kept indoors as pets. That's how ridiculous people who butcher rabbits are, they only think in terms of this sentient being needs to be killed/consumed.

Many rabbit parents know about the type of human who callously considers a lagomorph as commodity object. Nothing more than a piece of flesh. Keep falling in love and learn to speak bunny language. I'm glad you're doing research on bonding, with help from Blue eyes link.

If you rescue/purchase/adopt a 2nd bun simply be aware that you may have Two lucky house buns if they are incompatible (once fixed). Sometimes over time they decide, "ok, this bunny who eats hay and has uppy-ears isn't that offensive after all.)

Any (labeled-for-butcher-bin) rabbit you choose to adopt/purchase/rescue will acclimate to loving treatment. Our thriantra 4H garage sale girl was a feisty one! She latched onto hubby more so than me. I agree that certain smaller breeds can be more challenging (feisty or aloof) than the mixed-mutt breeds found at shelters or sitting at a rescue waiting for a forever-loving home.

We continue to care for several (ah, numerous) from outdoor wooden hutches, abandoned buns, or those on a High-Kill list.

 

TreasuredFriend

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Photo: Our bitey boy who put a scar in my hand (at the shelter) next to his less-abled harlequin sweetie. Both sp/eutered. They bonded after a trip to the DVM. - Three weeks after (foster transfer) gray dutch boy was removed from the shelter environment he was licking my skin!

I withdrew three dutches from a breeder-type outdoor housing (um, old-tech farm couple kept them as Birthday Presents to kids!) and one small-mix dutch is a lunger to this day. He was getting bit by the unneutered male that the old-tech people kept in the wooden hutch with him. Wondering if mental scars from the bites on his back never faded entirely. Five years later, he is mellowing, not as defensive. Cradling him like a baby when he agrees is very soothing.

We treated one dutch (a birthday present-labeled female) for coccidiosis. Yes, health concerns may arise.

Hope your rescue bun may encourage you later on to become a two-bunny furry family member home!
 

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Preitler

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Every rescued rabbit is grateful that a human understood they are pets, not commodity flesh objects. A friend wanted to purchase several rabbits from a place that killed them frequently for stomach consumption, however the person refused to sell once he knew his hutch rabbits would be altered and kept indoors as pets. That's how ridiculous people who butcher rabbits are, they only think in terms of this sentient being needs to be killed/consumed.
Those are harsh words, so, just to add another viewpoint:
Actually, in this situation I would have acted the same way. That is not the purpose of those rabbits, that's not the deal. I'm not too happy about some things in the meat industry, I have the resources and ability, so I grow my own food. And no, they are not just meat to me, that's not what animal husbandry is about. I care very much about them.

The people "rescueing" meat rabbits are like a fireman that sets a house on fire, just to feel as a hero when he puts it out after the damage is done. It's about their ego, not rabbits. There are so many good pet rabbits in shelters or uncared for in small backjard hutches , just creating more rabbits in need for a place isn't something good. It's naive, and selfish. Just creating problems for other people.
I do sell some rabbits as pets, but only those with outstanding good characters. I would never sell a skittish or mean rabbit, or just an average. I would feel bad for the future owner forever. Live is short, no point spending it on animals that bring more problems then joy.
By the way, pets are consumed too, for our mental needs, in the end it's the same outcome.

The symbiosis between man and animals is not about individuals. I know, not easy to understand for many living in our pampered bubble world. Rabbits found a niche to exist, using humans. Pet rabbits are a rather new fad, another niche.

Many rabbit parents know about the type of human who callously considers a lagomorph as commodity object. Nothing more than a piece of flesh.
Actually, pets are commodity objects. Nothing more than something to project our feelings on, to comfort us, something to act out our needs and emotions that are part of us, but have no place in todays way of living. We are not a parent to a pet. We use it to fill a void, I definitly do. And that's perfectly ok too. But don't expect other people to be obliged to cater to those narrow views.

Some of my rabbits are pets, others lifestock. That are not qualities rabbits are born with, or what defines their existence, it's all in my head, what I project and therefore see in them.
 

judybarry70

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That's not quite right. Culling (removing from breeding) out any weak or sickly rabbits, or those with bad temperaments is a lot easier with meat rabbits, it's no fun working with skittish or mean animals, and health is a top priority.

In my opinion, random breeding because people think kits are cute, or accidential litters of pets are a little more prone to problems - for example, breeds with cute deformed skulls or lops need careful and vigilant breeders to avoid things like teeth issues, if you mix those randomly with other breeds you get random skull shapes and more risk for problems. Also, there's no culling for health or temperament.

Of course, as with pet breeds, it solely depends on the breeder if all that makes a difference. Good meat lines make great pets, they are bred to be stress resistant and healthy.

Getting a rabbit from a rescue or so has advantages, with kits you don't really know how the'll turn out.
 

judybarry70

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Very true, professional breeders DO select for health and good temperament, also I never thought there was anything "cute" about deformed sculls or selectively breeding the dwarfism gene, where 1/4 of the kits are "peanuts" and die after 10 days.
 

Mac189

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If you are planning to adopt a friend in the next few months, there will likely be a great deal of bunnies that were given as gifts for Easter (live animals are always poor gifts!) that their owners grew bored of who will need new, loving homes. These buns will come in all shapes, sizes, and breeds and will make excellent pets!
 

Jmaner

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We've adopted (aggressive, bitey) rabbits on a euth list from shelters. There's a scar on my hand to remind me every day of the lunging, skin-biting dutch mix boy. A territorial unspayed female (or bitey male) from an abusive environment brings great joy when they learn to trust their humans and feel safe.

Every rescued rabbit is grateful that a human understood they are pets, not commodity flesh objects. A friend wanted to purchase several rabbits from a place that killed them frequently for stomach consumption, however the person refused to sell once he knew his hutch rabbits would be altered and kept indoors as pets. That's how ridiculous people who butcher rabbits are, they only think in terms of this sentient being needs to be killed/consumed.

Many rabbit parents know about the type of human who callously considers a lagomorph as commodity object. Nothing more than a piece of flesh. Keep falling in love and learn to speak bunny language. I'm glad you're doing research on bonding, with help from Blue eyes link.

If you rescue/purchase/adopt a 2nd bun simply be aware that you may have Two lucky house buns if they are incompatible (once fixed). Sometimes over time they decide, "ok, this bunny who eats hay and has uppy-ears isn't that offensive after all.)

Any (labeled-for-butcher-bin) rabbit you choose to adopt/purchase/rescue will acclimate to loving treatment. Our thriantra 4H garage sale girl was a feisty one! She latched onto hubby more so than me. I agree that certain smaller breeds can be more challenging (feisty or aloof) than the mixed-mutt breeds found at shelters or sitting at a rescue waiting for a forever-loving home.

We continue to care for several (ah, numerous) from outdoor wooden hutches, abandoned buns, or those on a High-Kill list.

Bless your heart. We got a second bun. They hated each other, but we fell in love with both. Our dogs broke into second buns room and killed her. This happened yesterday. I’ve suffered losses, but her loss has me feeling so helpless.
 
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