Is it safe to spay a rabbit before they become aggressive?

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by Margarida Correia, Feb 21, 2019.

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  1. Feb 21, 2019 #1

    Margarida Correia

    Margarida Correia

    Margarida Correia

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    My female rabbit is currently 3 months old.
    I've done research and found out that a female rabbit can be spayed at 4 months.
    I've also read that, when they reach that age, rabbits become aggressive and that that behavioral problem can be fixed by spaying.

    I have a few questions:
    - Do rabbits always become aggressive at that age?
    - Is it possible/safe to spay a rabbit before they become aggressive? Can you prevent this behaviour?

    My rabbit is really sweet and we have a great bond.
     

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  2. Feb 21, 2019 #2

    Preitler

    Preitler

    Preitler

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    No, most don't change much, and "aggressive" is a wide term, many call what they don't understand aggression. It's more like their character gets more refined, and well, puberty can be a difficult time, not only for rabbits.

    How I see it:
    When becoming an adult their hormones tell them what being a bunny is all about, the one thing they are really great at, which can confuse and frustrate does that have no chance to follow these instincts. Some more, some less, but when those more prone to it are craving for being bred, have false pregnancies or direct all that energy into "redecorating"(gnawing and destroying), "home building"(my doe started a tunnel streight into the wall, after 2" of plaster the bricks stopped her) and claiming territory (pee here, pee there) can make them difficult pets. Not being able to live out those urges sure can make some grumpy, but I wouldn't call any of that "aggression", even when pawing, nipping etc. is involved. It's just, well. they are rabbits.

    My first house bunny, an intact doe I took in for quarentine, pretty much destroyed my apartment in 8 months (now she's a very happy outdoor bunny), my house rabbits now are a spayed doe and an intact buck.

    So, spaying relieves the doe from those hormonal stuff. It depends on the individual character of a rabbit how much it is effected by that, but imho spaying a pet rabbit is a good idea. Also makes it easier to introduce a companion later on.
     
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