Hi! Future bunny mom-have some questions!

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BunbunBannana

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Hi! I have been wanting a bunny for a while now. I have been doing loads of research, and have a plan. This is everything I plan on getting...
Cage-$51
Food-$10
Brush-$20
Alfalfa hay (until 6-7m) $16 5ib
food and water bowl-$9
Climbing tree $35
Rabbit chew ball set $14
Rabbit toy set $15
Nail trimmer $4
Rabbit net chew $10
Rabbit tunnel $10
Hide-bed $15
I have a cat carrier yesterdays news bedding and a litter box already. I will put a small hutch in there as a hide, but the door out will ALWAYS be open. The cage will be 24*48. Do I have everything I need? I have a relative that has a friend who has a friends who breeds rabbits for met or pets (tho they are cared for like pets), so that's where ill get them. I will get some of whatever food they give, and start transtioning to oxbow, and adding about a handful of veggies. It will be fed in the morning and evening. Will that work? I plan of letting it run in my room or backyard (with my supervision)for 1h+ every day. I plan on getting a vest and harness and stroller someday so I can take it on walks. Does anyone know of a bunnyfest in SF bay area? Also, if we leave our bunny for 3d without playtime will it be ok (during trips), For longer my grandma can take him and let him free roam in a spare floor. TYSM!!!
 

peanutdabunny

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I reccommend the hair buster by SPS and the furminator, it wont let me load your links. If you dont have this already I reccomed a hide house that has 2 exits/entrances! If it doesnt have this it will make your rabbit anxious and scared. And use an open litter box, not a close top one. And your cage seems a tad bit on the small side, your cage cant be a perminate housing in my opionion. Your rabbit will have to be out for at least 8 hours for it to be okay, Thats what I think
 
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peanutdabunny

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Also I really would not reccomend a harness, rabbits arent "walked" Its very dangerous for them. Some rabbits are scared when outside. Strollers are fine. If you got the idea from lennon the bunny, I wouldnt take that advice. I would get a cage the size of 4 by 4. the later connect 2 puppy pens, so its twice the size, and thats a good size. Oh and dont give veggies untill 6 months of age, and make sure you slowly introduce it. Or else your bunny can get runny poop. Oh and do not leave your bunny for more than a day with out someone checking on them, get a bunny sitter. Bunnies can get sick very very easily.
 
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Preitler

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Welcome :)

Hm. How you write sounds pretty exited and happy, I'm not sure that there aren't some misconceptions about rabbits. Have you spent some hours with rabbits some times, like visiting that breeder and spend some time there? Or do you know someone who has a pet rabbit? They are way different than other pets, in form of interaction and other stuff. A lot of cute youtube videos show rather special bunnies, and just their top 5% of the time. Most don't like being toted around, and it's not exactly like they go on a leash to explore the beach or park.

1h out of a small cage doesn't work like letting the dog in the yard, rabbits have their own schedules and times of activity (mostly morning/evening). Where will the rabbits be housed? If it's close to where you sleep you'll need to be able to cope with some action during untimely hours. My two house rabbits are free roam, sleep in my room but have their base with food and litter box in the vestibule.
Caging them up for 3 days, well, doable in an emergency, but they are not happy about their routine interrupted or the freedom they are used to cut back. But you can't stuff their cage with food and just leave them for the weekend. You'll always need someone to check on them, every day, appr. for the next 10-12years.

Anyway, cage: I'm breeding rabbits pretty much like that friend of a friend seems to do, for the same reasons, and my rabbits are 9-10lbs. This cage would be too small. As a homebase in a pen ok, with door always open, I would think. But with litter box, hay rack, food and water bowls and stuff, there wouldn't be much room to move left. Even for small rabbits.

To get an idea what indoor setups people are happy with can look like:

Cages and hutches advertisment is pretty bad, a lot of the stuff sold can just be used as home base in a run. Also, the wire spacing looks rather big to be useful as a floor or ramp, don't think this works like pictured.
Square-grid cages are quite popular though (NIC-grid cages), they have the huge advantage of being adaptable, so I would look for a source where you can get additional panels easily.

Quite some stuff you listed isn't necessary or free stuff is equally good or better, wouldn't buy those toys.
Big stuff is missing in the list if it's about the money, like getting the rabbit spayed/neutered (not a bad idea for indoor pets), and putting aside an emergency vet fund (better to have it and not need it, than the other way around).

I would stick to the food the rabbit is used to until it has well settled in and is about 12 weeks old, apart from adding grass hay to the diet if it isn't anyway. Extra high protein food like alfalfa or special pellets are not necessery since your goal isn't to get it to butchering weight asap. Special formulated pellets with fancy names are IMHO clever marketing, but not relevant.

When picking a rabbit, listen to the breeder. I have 17 kits right now, and I would never give away 4 of them because noone gets happy with skittsh, shy animals. Their temperaments and characters can be very diverse, so take your time. Also, the character changes when they grow up, so have a look at the adult ones too.

Getting an adult rabbit from a shelter as a first bunny would be a good option, you can see their adult character, and usually they are already spayed/neutered.

I might be wrongbecause of the way I percieve your text (english isn't my first language), but Imo it wouldn't be a bad idea to visit there a few times and spend some hours with the rabbits, to learn (dealing with rabbits comes with a steep learning curve) and get over the exitement. It's a decision for 10 or more years.
 

BunbunBannana

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I only use alfalfa untill 10 weeks, 12 weeks max
And if you can I really reccommend sherrwood pellets, it has no soy or grains, which oxbow has, also sherrwood is all organic.
Ok! So- No alphalpha. Also isn't sherwood for adults (the rabbit I plan on getting with be 2-6m).
I reccommend the hair buster by SPS and the furminator, it wont let me load your links. If you dont have this already I reccomed a hide house that has 2 exits/entrances! If it doesnt have this it will make your rabbit anxious and scared. And use an open litter box, not a close top one. And your cage seems a tad bit on the small side, your cage cant be a perminate housing in my opionion. Your rabbit will have to be out for at least 8 hours for it to be okay, Thats what I think
Yes, I do plan on getting a hairbuster. And I can make an open hide house! I think I can free roam the bun in my room, just spay the carpet with bitter apple spray...
Also I really would not reccomend a harness, rabbits arent "walked" Its very dangerous for them. Some rabbits are scared when outside. Strollers are fine. If you got the idea from lennon the bunny, I wouldnt take that advice. I would get a cage the size of 4 by 4. the later connect 2 puppy pens, so its twice the size, and thats a good size. Oh and dont give veggies untill 6 months of age, and make sure you slowly introduce it. Or else your bunny can get runny poop. Oh and do not leave your bunny for more than a day with out someone checking on them, get a bunny sitter. Bunnies can get sick very very easily.
Ok!
Welcome :)

Hm. How you write sounds pretty exited and happy, I'm not sure that there aren't some misconceptions about rabbits. Have you spent some hours with rabbits some times, like visiting that breeder and spend some time there? Or do you know someone who has a pet rabbit? They are way different than other pets, in form of interaction and other stuff. A lot of cute youtube videos show rather special bunnies, and just their top 5% of the time. Most don't like being toted around, and it's not exactly like they go on a leash to explore the beach or park.

1h out of a small cage doesn't work like letting the dog in the yard, rabbits have their own schedules and times of activity (mostly morning/evening). Where will the rabbits be housed? If it's close to where you sleep you'll need to be able to cope with some action during untimely hours. My two house rabbits are free roam, sleep in my room but have their base with food and litter box in the vestibule.
Caging them up for 3 days, well, doable in an emergency, but they are not happy about their routine interrupted or the freedom they are used to cut back. But you can't stuff their cage with food and just leave them for the weekend. You'll always need someone to check on them, every day, appr. for the next 10-12years.

Anyway, cage: I'm breeding rabbits pretty much like that friend of a friend seems to do, for the same reasons, and my rabbits are 9-10lbs. This cage would be too small. As a homebase in a pen ok, with door always open, I would think. But with litter box, hay rack, food and water bowls and stuff, there wouldn't be much room to move left. Even for small rabbits.

To get an idea what indoor setups people are happy with can look like:

Cages and hutches advertisment is pretty bad, a lot of the stuff sold can just be used as home base in a run. Also, the wire spacing looks rather big to be useful as a floor or ramp, don't think this works like pictured.
Square-grid cages are quite popular though (NIC-grid cages), they have the huge advantage of being adaptable, so I would look for a source where you can get additional panels easily.

Quite some stuff you listed isn't necessary or free stuff is equally good or better, wouldn't buy those toys.
Big stuff is missing in the list if it's about the money, like getting the rabbit spayed/neutered (not a bad idea for indoor pets), and putting aside an emergency vet fund (better to have it and not need it, than the other way around).

I would stick to the food the rabbit is used to until it has well settled in and is about 12 weeks old, apart from adding grass hay to the diet if it isn't anyway. Extra high protein food like alfalfa or special pellets are not necessery since your goal isn't to get it to butchering weight asap. Special formulated pellets with fancy names are IMHO clever marketing, but not relevant.

When picking a rabbit, listen to the breeder. I have 17 kits right now, and I would never give away 4 of them because noone gets happy with skittsh, shy animals. Their temperaments and characters can be very diverse, so take your time. Also, the character changes when they grow up, so have a look at the adult ones too.

Getting an adult rabbit from a shelter as a first bunny would be a good option, you can see their adult character, and usually they are already spayed/neutered.

I might be wrongbecause of the way I percieve your text (english isn't my first language), but Imo it wouldn't be a bad idea to visit there a few times and spend some hours with the rabbits, to learn (dealing with rabbits comes with a steep learning curve) and get over the exitement. It's a decision for 10 or more years.
Thanks! Unfortunately, there are no shelters in my area. What toys do you recommend? I have decided to let my bunny free roam in my room(I will spray the carpet with bitter apple spray). I had pet rats, so I already have a $500-700 vet vund.
 
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BunbunBannana

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Welcome :)

Hm. How you write sounds pretty exited and happy, I'm not sure that there aren't some misconceptions about rabbits. Have you spent some hours with rabbits some times, like visiting that breeder and spend some time there? Or do you know someone who has a pet rabbit? They are way different than other pets, in form of interaction and other stuff. A lot of cute youtube videos show rather special bunnies, and just their top 5% of the time. Most don't like being toted around, and it's not exactly like they go on a leash to explore the beach or park.

1h out of a small cage doesn't work like letting the dog in the yard, rabbits have their own schedules and times of activity (mostly morning/evening). Where will the rabbits be housed? If it's close to where you sleep you'll need to be able to cope with some action during untimely hours. My two house rabbits are free roam, sleep in my room but have their base with food and litter box in the vestibule.
Caging them up for 3 days, well, doable in an emergency, but they are not happy about their routine interrupted or the freedom they are used to cut back. But you can't stuff their cage with food and just leave them for the weekend. You'll always need someone to check on them, every day, appr. for the next 10-12years.

Anyway, cage: I'm breeding rabbits pretty much like that friend of a friend seems to do, for the same reasons, and my rabbits are 9-10lbs. This cage would be too small. As a homebase in a pen ok, with door always open, I would think. But with litter box, hay rack, food and water bowls and stuff, there wouldn't be much room to move left. Even for small rabbits.

To get an idea what indoor setups people are happy with can look like:

Cages and hutches advertisment is pretty bad, a lot of the stuff sold can just be used as home base in a run. Also, the wire spacing looks rather big to be useful as a floor or ramp, don't think this works like pictured.
Square-grid cages are quite popular though (NIC-grid cages), they have the huge advantage of being adaptable, so I would look for a source where you can get additional panels easily.

Quite some stuff you listed isn't necessary or free stuff is equally good or better, wouldn't buy those toys.
Big stuff is missing in the list if it's about the money, like getting the rabbit spayed/neutered (not a bad idea for indoor pets), and putting aside an emergency vet fund (better to have it and not need it, than the other way around).

I would stick to the food the rabbit is used to until it has well settled in and is about 12 weeks old, apart from adding grass hay to the diet if it isn't anyway. Extra high protein food like alfalfa or special pellets are not necessery since your goal isn't to get it to butchering weight asap. Special formulated pellets with fancy names are IMHO clever marketing, but not relevant.

When picking a rabbit, listen to the breeder. I have 17 kits right now, and I would never give away 4 of them because noone gets happy with skittsh, shy animals. Their temperaments and characters can be very diverse, so take your time. Also, the character changes when they grow up, so have a look at the adult ones too.

Getting an adult rabbit from a shelter as a first bunny would be a good option, you can see their adult character, and usually they are already spayed/neutered.

I might be wrongbecause of the way I percieve your text (english isn't my first language), but Imo it wouldn't be a bad idea to visit there a few times and spend some hours with the rabbits, to learn (dealing with rabbits comes with a steep learning curve) and get over the exitement. It's a decision for 10 or more years.
Ok! So- No alphalpha. Also isn't sherwood for adults (the rabbit I plan on getting with be 2-6m).

Yes, I do plan on getting a hairbuster. And I can make an open hide house! I think I can free roam the bun in my room, just spay the carpet with bitter apple spray...

Ok!

Thanks! Unfortunately, there are no shelters in my area. What toys do you recommend? I have decided to let my bunny free roam in my room(I will spray the carpet with bitter apple spray).
And I don't have a problem with the noise, I sleep with 2 LOUD aqariums.
 

John Wick

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To start, I have a bias of playing devil's advocate and essentially trying to convince people not to get a pet rabbit. I mean it with good intentions though, as I think it's important to understand the less glamorous parts of rabbit care and how things can be less great/go wrong. In getting a pet rabbit, you need to be willing to care for the rabbit through both the pleasant and unpleasant experiences.

Re: the listed supplies, many rabbits chew/destroy fabrics and soft things, so the bed and tunnel for example may be things you end up not using because of potential ingestion risks. Bitter apple spray does not work for many rabbits. Also, rabbits are commonly animals who don't really use things for their intended purposes. In fact, I'd think it's more likely for a rabbit to use the hide-bed as a bathroom than a bed/sleep spot. I also don't see many rabbits using the cat climbing tree as intended, based on its layout. As @Preitler mentions, what you're seeing on social media are pretty unusual for rabbits. It's not impossible, but I think it's better to assume you will have a rabbit that will not enjoy cuddling with you all the time and being picked up, dressed up, and be more of a dog than a rabbit, in terms of companionship.

Also, the NIC grid pen you have requires additional things. You need to separately buy/make flooring for it, as rabbits cannot walk on the grids due to their large spacing. You need to buy, cut, and attach a sturdy material to the top of the grid floors. Many people buy coroplast and then add carpet squares or something on top to add traction (since coroplast is smooth). How ever you end up setting up and flooring the NIC cage, realize you need to be able to have access to and easily clean it in case of peeing/pooping/messes occurring in places you didn't intend them too.

If the door will always be open, you need to consider all the rabbit-proofing that needs to be done. I am a bit confused about having them free-roam with your supervision for 1h+ each day, but also always having the cage door open. Lets say there is a day you can only supervise for 3 hours-- does that mean the rabbit would be in the NIC cage for the rest of the day? If that's the case, I recommend buying two of the NIC cages so you have more grids to make a larger cage, and also purchasing an X-pen to attach to it, so the rabbit's restricted space (i.e. space when not supervised) is as large as can be. Going back to rabbit proofing, having a free-roam rabbit means being willing to make changes and be OK with a certain level of property damage during a learning curve... Spraying your carpet with bitter apple spray, in my opinion, isn't likely to stop a rabbit from pulling and digging up carpet, as an owner of a carpet digging/chewing rabbit myself. Also carpet takes up a lot of space, and spraying it all seems like a lot of work. There's also the fact that while rabbits tend to use litterboxes, it is not 100% and some rabbits simply aren't as adherent as others. One of my rabbits is a gem at it, while the other is completely not. I clean up pee stays daily from him. If you have baseboards, exposed wall corners, wooden/plastic furniture, these are all things that a rabbit may be tempted to chew, so buying grids to block them off or moving things around to prevent a rabbit from getting there can be a big part of rabbit proofing. Also, rabbits love to pee on beds, so understanding that you might need to cover your bed with a water-proof cover or something when they're out is a part of that.

You absolutely do not need to reveal any specifics of your situation, but if you are someone who is living with others and rely on others for transportation and finances, understand that pet rabbits require specialized vets, which can be more expensive and harder to find than dog/cat vets. Pet rabbits require ongoing purchases, so someone is responsible for buying new hay, veggies, and toys at regular intervals for 10+ years. There are many misconceptions about pet rabbits, so if someone else (ex. a parent, primary household caretaker) has more authority over how money is spent, how the home needs to be arranged, who gets access to a vehicle, that individual needs to be willing to work with you, rather than be stubborn against you. Unfortunately, I know of many situations of children (not assuming you are, but just saying to make a point) who seem like they'd be excellent pet rabbit owners, but their parents were unwilling to provide what was needed and it ultimately led to the rabbit suffering and/or rehoming the rabbit.
 

Preitler

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Rabbits love apples, and eat a lot of bitter stuff. And why would you spray the carpet with that, they are not supposed to eat carpet? Joke aside, this isn't a rabbit deterrent.

Don't give the rabbit too much room from the start, for the first days until it has settled in a cage is ok, then a small pen until it has figured out that the litter box is the place to pee in, can take weeks, and then gradually expand it's little universe.

A friend of mine had to rehome her rabbits because she got panic attacks due to their night time activities, v
 

BunbunBannana

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To start, I have a bias of playing devil's advocate and essentially trying to convince people not to get a pet rabbit. I mean it with good intentions though, as I think it's important to understand the less glamorous parts of rabbit care and how things can be less great/go wrong. In getting a pet rabbit, you need to be willing to care for the rabbit through both the pleasant and unpleasant experiences.

Re: the listed supplies, many rabbits chew/destroy fabrics and soft things, so the bed and tunnel for example may be things you end up not using because of potential ingestion risks. Bitter apple spray does not work for many rabbits. Also, rabbits are commonly animals who don't really use things for their intended purposes. In fact, I'd think it's more likely for a rabbit to use the hide-bed as a bathroom than a bed/sleep spot. I also don't see many rabbits using the cat climbing tree as intended, based on its layout. As @Preitler mentions, what you're seeing on social media are pretty unusual for rabbits. It's not impossible, but I think it's better to assume you will have a rabbit that will not enjoy cuddling with you all the time and being picked up, dressed up, and be more of a dog than a rabbit, in terms of companionship.

Also, the NIC grid pen you have requires additional things. You need to separately buy/make flooring for it, as rabbits cannot walk on the grids due to their large spacing. You need to buy, cut, and attach a sturdy material to the top of the grid floors. Many people buy coroplast and then add carpet squares or something on top to add traction (since coroplast is smooth). How ever you end up setting up and flooring the NIC cage, realize you need to be able to have access to and easily clean it in case of peeing/pooping/messes occurring in places you didn't intend them too.

If the door will always be open, you need to consider all the rabbit-proofing that needs to be done. I am a bit confused about having them free-roam with your supervision for 1h+ each day, but also always having the cage door open. Lets say there is a day you can only supervise for 3 hours-- does that mean the rabbit would be in the NIC cage for the rest of the day? If that's the case, I recommend buying two of the NIC cages so you have more grids to make a larger cage, and also purchasing an X-pen to attach to it, so the rabbit's restricted space (i.e. space when not supervised) is as large as can be. Going back to rabbit proofing, having a free-roam rabbit means being willing to make changes and be OK with a certain level of property damage during a learning curve... Spraying your carpet with bitter apple spray, in my opinion, isn't likely to stop a rabbit from pulling and digging up carpet, as an owner of a carpet digging/chewing rabbit myself. Also carpet takes up a lot of space, and spraying it all seems like a lot of work. There's also the fact that while rabbits tend to use litterboxes, it is not 100% and some rabbits simply aren't as adherent as others. One of my rabbits is a gem at it, while the other is completely not. I clean up pee stays daily from him. If you have baseboards, exposed wall corners, wooden/plastic furniture, these are all things that a rabbit may be tempted to chew, so buying grids to block them off or moving things around to prevent a rabbit from getting there can be a big part of rabbit proofing. Also, rabbits love to pee on beds, so understanding that you might need to cover your bed with a water-proof cover or something when they're out is a part of that.

You absolutely do not need to reveal any specifics of your situation, but if you are someone who is living with others and rely on others for transportation and finances, understand that pet rabbits require specialized vets, which can be more expensive and harder to find than dog/cat vets. Pet rabbits require ongoing purchases, so someone is responsible for buying new hay, veggies, and toys at regular intervals for 10+ years. There are many misconceptions about pet rabbits, so if someone else (ex. a parent, primary household caretaker) has more authority over how money is spent, how the home needs to be arranged, who gets access to a vehicle, that individual needs to be willing to work with you, rather than be stubborn against you. Unfortunately, I know of many situations of children (not assuming you are, but just saying to make a point) who seem like they'd be excellent pet rabbit owners, but their parents were unwilling to provide what was needed and it ultimately led to the rabbit suffering and/or rehoming the rabbit.
I understand. I have kept pet rats for a while, so I am used to some things (like pee and poop). And I meant I will just have the bun free roam. I already found a vet (we took our rats to her). We have plenty of vet funds (500-700). Honestly, my room is perfect for rabbit-proofing. all my stuff is on shelves, I don't have many corners, etc. I will have to hope my rabbit won't chew the carpet...
 

peanutdabunny

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I understand. I have kept pet rats for a while, so I am used to some things (like pee and poop). And I meant I will just have the bun free roam. I already found a vet (we took our rats to her). We have plenty of vet funds (500-700). Honestly, my room is perfect for rabbit-proofing. all my stuff is on shelves, I don't have many corners, etc. I will have to hope my rabbit won't chew the carpet...
Can you foster at all?
 

Blue eyes

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Sherwood has food pellets for baby rabbits (through 12 weeks+ of age). But, as already mentioned, stick with what the rabbit is used to for the first few weeks.

Also, bun should be confined to its cage for the first few days. You want him to establish the cage as his territory and as his "safe space." Don't make the mistake of allowing him out to roam too soon. Roaming starts with a small area outside the cage and gradually gets larger.

Here's a summary of how to setup a cage (from my website):

There is also a method that helps bunny get settled and an important part of that is preparing ahead of time. This link helps with that:

I'd agree that there are a number of items on your list that are pricey and/or unnecessary. Of course you can get them if you like, but if you are trying to watch your spending, several items can be skipped (or gotten later on).
 

peanutdabunny

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I wouldnt pick Kaytee hay, I would choose SPS for best hay! (not there pellets though) Also you dont need the cat tree, or the cardboard castle, I would reccomend the toki hut castle. I would also reccomend there foraging mat. I would go to chewy for toys. I would get the rosewood pack of mats, the rosewood ball set, and a few oxbow toys. They are much better quality than amazon, you can also get toys from SPS here SMALL PET SELECT (for some reason this link gives a 20% discount) I reccomend you get the sampler box. SPS has great toys and treats that are amazing for keeping your pet in good health. I would reccomend it for baby rabbits 110% I also love the willow rings, all bunnies love them. So stay away from amazon. (as the things can come from unsafe china facilaties) the tunnel your getting is quite expensive. if you have ikea near you, you can get a huge one for $7! If you want beds and interactive toys you can go to shein. Not the most sustainable brand, but it has some cute beds.
 

BunbunBannana

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I wouldnt pick Kaytee hay, I would choose SPS for best hay! (not there pellets though) Also you dont need the cat tree, or the cardboard castle, I would reccomend the toki hut castle. I would also reccomend there foraging mat. I would go to chewy for toys. I would get the rosewood pack of mats, the rosewood ball set, and a few oxbow toys. They are much better quality than amazon, you can also get toys from SPS here SMALL PET SELECT (for some reason this link gives a 20% discount) I reccomend you get the sampler box. SPS has great toys and treats that are amazing for keeping your pet in good health. I would reccomend it for baby rabbits 110% I also love the willow rings, all bunnies love them. So stay away from amazon. (as the things can come from unsafe china facilaties) the tunnel your getting is quite expensive. if you have ikea near you, you can get a huge one for $7! If you want beds and interactive toys you can go to shein. Not the most sustainable brand, but it has some cute beds.
Thanks. I plan on going to the pet store for the hay (to get the freshest they have). I plan on making a foraging mat, aswell as a cardboard castle. And I am fine with paying, amazon just works best for me. Here is the new list...
Food-$10
Brush-$20
Timothy hay from pet shop $20
food and water bowl-$9
Rabbit chew set $14
Rabbit ball and carrot $8
Nail trimmer $4
Seagrass chew mat $10
Circle tunnel $35
 

BunbunBannana

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Guys, would a cage 42 by 82 be big enough. The carpet won't let me free roam-dang.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Guys, would a cage 42 by 82 be big enough. The carpet won't let me free roam-dang.
42 by 82 inches? it still sounds quite a bit too small. Thankfully, it's not a thin line between a caged bunny and a free-roaming bunny. There are loads of options in between, the best might be an xpen. However, your bunny will still need a few hours (or preferably most of the day) out of the pen to exercise x

 

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Montana
There are actually some pretty decent methods to rabbit-proof carpet if the carpet is the only deterrent to free roam. The method I used was getting a large (9'x9') flat woven area rug to cover 90% of the carpet and then placing "wood" linoleum tiles on the edge to prevent any access to the carpet. It worked very well and actually greatly improved the aesthetic of the space (although I have quite the vendetta against carpet in general). I greatly enjoy "McGyvering" rabbit proofing problems, many of them can be solved with some troubleshooting and stuff you have on hand.

I think Preitler and John Wick did a really good job playing devil's advocate, so I won't try to play with perfection. I will note that the Bay Area is home to tons of awesome rescues for you to check out and contact. Breeders are a wealth of information and often a very good place to get a rabbit, however, I generally think an already spayed/neutered adult is the best choice for a new rabbit parent. Occasionally breeders will have an adult rabbit they are looking to rehome (such as a failed breeder or a rabbit they hoped would be show quality but turned out to be pet quality) and that could be a good option too.

I would HIGHLY recommend a read-through of Rabbits for Dummies for anyone new to rabbits. I cannot describe how much this book helped me when I was starting out. It's pretty general, but it answers all of the questions you should ask before selecting and moving forward with a new rabbit.
 
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