Breeding? Or no babies?

Discussion in 'Rabbit Knowledge Library' started by TheBookWorm107, Jun 15, 2019.

Help Support Rabbits Online by donating:

  1. Jun 15, 2019 #1

    TheBookWorm107

    TheBookWorm107

    TheBookWorm107

    Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cleveland
    A249FAD6-E089-44C2-8B2D-1942FC407001.jpeg D154AB73-2377-4F67-94E5-1EB0F7D25E50.jpeg D154AB73-2377-4F67-94E5-1EB0F7D25E50.jpeg D7DFD1EA-9BFC-4B3F-827E-9DBEEC99D9F6.jpeg 1B4DFFBD-58DA-4A87-9B48-D915EDAE8500.jpeg B333E5B1-7D3E-4558-B32A-C850BE83C9BD.jpeg DC86B565-C1EB-4C16-8F11-054B689FC3D6.jpeg 54FA56BA-21AF-4EF8-B0B2-B46FB62F08A7.jpeg B2A15CF8-FE44-46CE-99FB-1FC1B35E3A31.jpeg 892A6ED7-8FE8-408C-B6D1-3A3E6B1A43FF.jpeg 28F7B5DA-B924-4A10-8A84-E1B8EEE217E0.png So I have posted about Valdez and Saori in the past.
    Valdez was born in January, he is a Lionhead with a double mane
    Saori was born in March, and she is a broken cream English Lop. She is currently 8 pounds.
    Neither of them have been fixed.

    Colorings: cream & white fur with gray/blue eyes
    Fawn with chocolate markings and mahogany brown eyes

    So here’s my delihma, I’ve already successfully bonded them. They live in different cages but they share the same floor space to run. Usually 6 hours a day, and Saori gets an additional hour outside on her harness. Otherwise is she territorial of her litter box and cage and will snort in anger to make herself clear that she won’t share that space with him. But everywhere else is fine.
    (The specialty vet gave me flea&tick meds that were safe for her. If she doesn’t get her walk she’s more irritating and rambunctious than a Great Dane living in a one-bedroom apartment with only 2 hours worth of walking per week)

    Anyway, I’m planning to get them fixed a week apart from each other, but I’m wondering if I should let them have 1 litter first? I’d keep one baby and bond the three together then take the remainder down to the Rabbit Rescue in Columbus. And most likely the staff would probably bond them to a fellow bunny and the two would end up adopted together to a nice home.

    I’ve never done breeding. I only know the basics of nesting and male-humping. But I like when my babies are happy.

    Thoughts? Advice? (Only intelligent responses, no haters or unhelpful rants/opinions)
     
  2. Jun 15, 2019 #2

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2012
    Messages:
    5,842
    Likes Received:
    2,009
    Location:
    Arizona, USA
    I don't see a reason to breed them for their sake.

    It's not like a rabbit "wants" babies. That would be anthropomorphizing.

    It wouldn't be for the purpose of "bettering the breed" since they aren't the same breed.

    The idea of keeping a baby isn't so great either. There is no guarantee they would bond. Trios are not easily accomplished. And the 2 cannot be considered fully bonded if they are unable to share a cage. Once they are both fixed (and the male has 4-8 weeks to heal and allow hormones to dissipate) the original two may (or may not) decide to bond. That remains to be seen.

    The thought of taking your remaining babies to a rabbit rescue has problems as well. Many rescues are over full. If they do happen to have room, they don't take kindly to being handed over babies that you deliberately bred. (Sometimes, too, people who turn in animals to a rescue are then banned from adopting any in the future.)

    For all of these reasons, I'd suggest skipping any breeding and just getting them fixed.

    (Your lop is gorgeous, btw!)
     
    Theo and Alyssa and Bugs♡ like this.
  3. Jun 16, 2019 #3

    John Wick

    John Wick

    John Wick

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2019
    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    91
    Location:
    United States
    I agree with Blue eyes -- it's not explicitly said in your post (unless I missed it, in which case, sorry!), but it sounds like you'd like to have 1 litter so they have a chance to do so? In other words, for their sake, and if that's the case, you don't need to worry about having a litter. Rabbits do not need the experience of a litter in order to be happy at all, especially when they are fixed.

    I will also re-emphasize Blue eyes very good point that rabbit rescues are really full, and even those with room, I think those spaces should be for rabbits who have been unfortunately abandoned (non-preventable cases), rather than for rabbits who were intentionally bred and intentionally given away.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2019 at 9:24 PM #4

    Esthezyl

    Esthezyl

    Esthezyl

    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2019
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Japan, Nagoya
    Sorry, this is going to be a little hard to watch, but:

    http://www.friendsofunwantedrabbits.org/available-for-adoption/gone-but-not-forgotten/

    'Euthanized for lack of space'

    There are a lot of expensive breeds, litter trained and perfectly bonded bunnies in this long, long list. Whatever you do, nothing, nothing will guarantee your babies won't get the same treatment.

    Please, don't breed more bunnies, pro breeding isn't perfect (the bad 'products' end for cheap in pet stores or fairs), amateur breeding is full of risks (complications at birth, mother eating her babies because of the stress, parents of parents you don't know what genetic problems they had that might skip one generation straight to the babies, splayed legs, peanuts, etc) and shelters are already at full capacities.
     
    Theo likes this.

Share This Page