Teeth Trimming: File or Electric Drill?

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Camelia_Eva

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Sorry for my many questions! but do you have an opinion on which methodology: file or electric drill is safer, less aggressive and efficient for teeth trimming?

Thank you!
 

John Wick

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My rabbit has always gotten it done with an electric dremel tool with a diamond head under anesthesia. Are files a literal file, like, for your nails? I think the idea is making it as swift as possible because lots of aggravation can cause lateral splits, which may invite tooth infections as well as pain. That's why clippers aren't considered good. I'm unsure of the procedures for an actual file?
 

Camelia_Eva

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My rabbit has always gotten it done with an electric dremel tool with a diamond head under anesthesia. Are files a literal file, like, for your nails? I think the idea is making it as swift as possible because lots of aggravation can cause lateral splits, which may invite tooth infections as well as pain. That's why clippers aren't considered good. I'm unsure of the procedures for an actual file?
Yes, it seems the "files" are like the nail files but made of metal. I could not find any info about them so I wonder if this is an old technique. However, some vets use it.
 

Mackenzie Salm

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Most people don't file down their rabbits teeth so thats probably why you can't find any info on it. If you really need to people go to the vet. But in the future you can give your rabbit apple sticks and they will chew off the bark and that should keep their teeth down and entertain them.
 

Camelia_Eva

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Most people don't file down their rabbits teeth so thats probably why you can't find any info on it. If you really need to people go to the vet. But in the future you can give your rabbit apple sticks and they will chew off the bark and that should keep their teeth down and entertain them.
The vet is the one that uses the file method to trim the bun's teeth. I wouldn't dare to do it! However, another vet told me that she uses electric drills. But I could not find what are the advantages/disadvantages of each technique.

I have learnt that the apple sticks or any toy will help with the teeth trimming if they are positioned in the right way. For instance, if the bun uses a cage, put the sticks between the bars in a corner but diagonally. In this way the bun can chew it using its molars. My bunny is "free-range" so I need to think where and how to position the toys and sticks around the house. The house has been bunny-proofed also.
 

Preitler

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Apple (willow, ash, forsithia, beech, hornbeam, birch, hazel etc. etc.) sticks, branches and toys are great, I absolute reccomend them for different reasons, but I can't see how they can have a noticeable impact on teeth issues.

Normally, the teeth wear down when eating grass, hay, leafy stuff, they cut that into small pieces and their front teeth work like scissors, rubbing on each other and that's what wears them down, not the stuff they are eating. So, it's important to give stuff that leads to the right chewing motion.

Unfortunatly, that doesn't work when there is a misalignment, like due to so-sweet-squashed faces of some breeds, bad breeding lines, or just individual defects, that's when trimming becomes necessary.

I have no experience with trimming teeth, but as a handyman I think that files and dremel tools are ok, files may need more time, but it's a way to work very exact, rotary tools sure are ok too, if it's an actual dremel and not something like a dentist tool with cooling there might be the possibility of local overheating, but I'm sure vets know what they are doing.
 

Blue eyes

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^ yes! As Prietler said, it isn't sticks that wear down their teeth but the grinding motion they use when chewing hay/grass. There is also silica in hay (grass) that acts like sandpaper to help grind down those teeth.
 

Camelia_Eva

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Apple (willow, ash, forsithia, beech, hornbeam, birch, hazel etc. etc.) sticks, branches and toys are great, I absolute reccomend them for different reasons, but I can't see how they can have a noticeable impact on teeth issues.

Normally, the teeth wear down when eating grass, hay, leafy stuff, they cut that into small pieces and their front teeth work like scissors, rubbing on each other and that's what wears them down, not the stuff they are eating. So, it's important to give stuff that leads to the right chewing motion.

Unfortunatly, that doesn't work when there is a misalignment, like due to so-sweet-squashed faces of some breeds, bad breeding lines, or just individual defects, that's when trimming becomes necessary.

I have no experience with trimming teeth, but as a handyman I think that files and dremel tools are ok, files may need more time, but it's a way to work very exact, rotary tools sure are ok too, if it's an actual dremel and not something like a dentist tool with cooling there might be the possibility of local overheating, but I'm sure vets know what they are doing.
thanks Priettler and Blue Eyes for the tips and info!
 

cuteus

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I never had to do trimming on my buns,TG. Must be the genes. Some never need it no matter their diets. When researching possible teeth issues on my current bun, I found this pdf that scared the heck out of me. There is a picture of a trim by a surgeon and a negative outcome. Maybe the info will help decide the best course of action. http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Dental_diseases/Differential/Rabbit_dentistry.pdf
 

John Wick

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Experience of the vet is very important, just like if you were going in for a spay or neuter. My rabbit has had 13 dental grindings (electric dremel, under anesthesia) and has always bounced back a couple hours later. The vet I had was very experienced with dental procedures so there were never complications. She was excellent and communicated with me the one time she said she burred slightly into the cheek and provided pain medication if there were any negative signs, so whatever the outcome of the teeth (needs intervention or not), make sure you're discussing with a teeth savvy vet!
 

Camelia_Eva

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I never had to do trimming on my buns,TG. Must be the genes. Some never need it no matter their diets. When researching possible teeth issues on my current bun, I found this pdf that scared the heck out of me. There is a picture of a trim by a surgeon and a negative outcome. Maybe the info will help decide the best course of action. http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/Dental_diseases/Differential/Rabbit_dentistry.pdf
thank you, Cuteus, very much for the article. It has very good info. I had to read it by stages because it impresses me :eek:/
Oh picture # 9 is horrible! they trim the bun teeth with nail clippers!!!

No mention of "files" as a method to trim the teeth. This is a wake up call for me because the vet we were going to see uses file to do the trimming.
I spoke with an experienced exotic vet, she said that the electric dremel is more precised. She said that a file will file all teeth rather than tackling the ones that need trimming. The file technique takes longer and can produce more debris. The key thing is to have an experienced vet doing it. The experienced vet I spoke with is 1.5 hours away from where I live though.
 

Camelia_Eva

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Experience of the vet is very important, just like if you were going in for a spay or neuter. My rabbit has had 13 dental grindings (electric dremel, under anesthesia) and has always bounced back a couple hours later. The vet I had was very experienced with dental procedures so there were never complications. She was excellent and communicated with me the one time she said she burred slightly into the cheek and provided pain medication if there were any negative signs, so whatever the outcome of the teeth (needs intervention or not), make sure you're discussing with a teeth savvy vet!
You are SOOO right! I'll keep it in mind: experienced and honest. Honesty is key because if he/she made a mistake or something like hurting the cheek, and says nothing, that can bring lot of problems.
You are blessed having an experienced and honest vet!
 

cuteus

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thank you, Cuteus, very much for the article. It has very good info. I had to read it by stages because it impresses me :eek:/
Oh picture # 9 is horrible! they trim the bun teeth with nail clippers!!!

No mention of "files" as a method to trim the teeth. This is a wake up call for me because the vet we were going to see uses file to do the trimming.
I spoke with an experienced exotic vet, she said that the electric dremel is more precised. She said that a file will file all teeth rather than tackling the ones that need trimming. The file technique takes longer and can produce more debris. The key thing is to have an experienced vet doing it. The experienced vet I spoke with is 1.5 hours away from where I live though.
YW! I could not read the whole thing, it was so painful to even see all the tools the vet uses, the clamps and stuff to open the mouth in every direction! I imagine those tools will also injure if not careful. Bunnies must be sore after all that mouth stretching...Or maybe it looks worse than it is...Good Luck!
 
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