Baby Brothers & Neutering?

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Floof

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I am going to be getting two brother Holland Lops and I have a few questions. From what I have been reading I need to house them separately until after they are neutered or they might fight. That is fine but is 3 months a safe age to neuter them? Or should I wait longer? Also at what age do they typically start fighting? I was hoping to still let them interact with each other while supervised. And then lastly do you think the success rate of them bonding after their neuter will be high or low? Im trying to learn as much as possible but it’s all a bit overwhelming and I want to get it right.
 

JBun

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Baby bunnies are usually ok to stay together until 10 weeks old, possibly a little longer. It all depends on the hormones coming in. When they start trying to hump each other, they definitely need to be separated then, as that can cause a fight to break out, which could result in serious injuries. Though you may be able to still allow them to have play time together if they can refrain from trying to just hump each other the whole time. Most hormonal male buns can't. I had some baby buns that I separated at around 11 weeks old, but still let them have time together for a few weeks after. Of course this needs to be  very closely supervised if you do try it.

Usually their testicles don't fully descend until around 4 months old, so most vets won't neuter before then. And some say 6 months old, especially if you have a smaller breed rabbit. You'll just need to ask the vet the age they'll neuter at, and I would recommend finding a very experienced rabbit vet for it. It minimizes the chances of things going wrong with the surgery.



Here's a list of known rabbit vets, though I would still recommend doing your own research to find the best one for your bun.


There's always a chance your rabbits will rebond after being neutered, but there's no way to know for sure. It all depends on their individual personalities post neuter. Fixed male/female tends to be the best match, but 2 fixed males can work as well. You just have to wait and see. You do have to wait a minimum of 4 weeks post neuter, for hormones to fade before attempting the bonding process, though sometimes waiting 8 weeks is necessary. Basically long enough that they're no longer just immediately wanting to hump each other incessantly the whole time. But even with fixed rabbits some dominance humping will occur, though it should be minimal.



 

Preitler

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Things are a little different over here, bucklings get neutered from the age of 8 weeks up. This has the advantage that they don't go through puberty and don't even get the idea that every other buck is a foe by default and are easier to bond. So, I would neuter as soon as your vet is comfortable with, but I haven't heard much about it done that early in the US.

I keep my bucklings together up to 5 months, but I do not recommend that since it's in larger groups which imho makes things easier, also they are a bigger breed and mature slower, are rather laid back and have enough space. There was a single incident of fighting in 10 years which resulted in carnage, 3 mortally wounded.
Can't tell about smaller, more sprightly breeds.
I never tried to keep 2 males together long term, that's the more problematic combination even when neutered (the most if intact), If the characters don't match up after maturing (being siblings does not help much in that regard) you might still end up with two single rabbits.

What I would not do is putting them together occasionally, imho that's a way to nurture rivalry, either keep them together 24/7 and keep a close eye on them for brewing trouble (no issue with my rabbits at 12 weeks) - which could be difficult for first time rabbit owners and if it escalates, it escalates quickly, or seperate completly and reintroduce properly (neutral ground etc...) several weeks after neuter. There's no guarantee that it will work long term, sometimes it does, sometimes not, I don't know how the odds are since I don't have neutered males.
 

Floof

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Baby bunnies are usually ok to stay together until 10 weeks old, possibly a little longer. It all depends on the hormones coming in. When they start trying to hump each other, they definitely need to be separated then, as that can cause a fight to break out, which could result in serious injuries. Though you may be able to still allow them to have play time together if they can refrain from trying to just hump each other the whole time. Most hormonal male buns can't. I had some baby buns that I separated at around 11 weeks old, but still let them have time together for a few weeks after. Of course this needs to be  very closely supervised if you do try it.

Usually their testicles don't fully descend until around 4 months old, so most vets won't neuter before then. And some say 6 months old, especially if you have a smaller breed rabbit. You'll just need to ask the vet the age they'll neuter at, and I would recommend finding a very experienced rabbit vet for it. It minimizes the chances of things going wrong with the surgery.



Here's a list of known rabbit vets, though I would still recommend doing your own research to find the best one for your bun.


There's always a chance your rabbits will rebond after being neutered, but there's no way to know for sure. It all depends on their individual personalities post neuter. Fixed male/female tends to be the best match, but 2 fixed males can work as well. You just have to wait and see. You do have to wait a minimum of 4 weeks post neuter, for hormones to fade before attempting the bonding process, though sometimes waiting 8 weeks is necessary. Basically long enough that they're no longer just immediately wanting to hump each other incessantly the whole time. But even with fixed rabbits some dominance humping will occur, though it should be minimal.



Thanks for responding. I may rethink getting two at the same time. Initially I only wanted one bunny but once I found out they might get lonely that’s when I started to consider getting two. I am a stay at home mom so I have lots of time to dedicate to the bunny. I am home most of the time. I appreciate all of the information.
 

Floof

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Things are a little different over here, bucklings get neutered from the age of 8 weeks up. This has the advantage that they don't go through puberty and don't even get the idea that every other buck is a foe by default and are easier to bond. So, I would neuter as soon as your vet is comfortable with, but I haven't heard much about it done that early in the US.

I keep my bucklings together up to 5 months, but I do not recommend that since it's in larger groups which imho makes things easier, also they are a bigger breed and mature slower, are rather laid back and have enough space. There was a single incident of fighting in 10 years which resulted in carnage, 3 mortally wounded.
Can't tell about smaller, more sprightly breeds.
I never tried to keep 2 males together long term, that's the more problematic combination even when neutered (the most if intact), If the characters don't match up after maturing (being siblings does not help much in that regard) you might still end up with two single rabbits.

What I would not do is putting them together occasionally, imho that's a way to nurture rivalry, either keep them together 24/7 and keep a close eye on them for brewing trouble (no issue with my rabbits at 12 weeks) - which could be difficult for first time rabbit owners and if it escalates, it escalates quickly, or seperate completly and reintroduce properly (neutral ground etc...) several weeks after neuter. There's no guarantee that it will work long term, sometimes it does, sometimes not, I don't know how the odds are since I don't have neutered males.
Thanks for responding. Im also hoping I can find a vet that will neuter fairly young as well. I have already called a few vets in my area to make sure they accept rabbits at their clinic. I got some price quotes but forgot to ask at what age they will neuter. I need to call them back and check. From what I’ve read it’s fairly safe to neuter the males at a young age but it’s the females that it’s best to wait until at least 5-6 months. But I have zero experience with any of this.
 

Diane R

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Thanks for responding. I may rethink getting two at the same time. Initially I only wanted one bunny but once I found out they might get lonely that’s when I started to consider getting two. I am a stay at home mom so I have lots of time to dedicate to the bunny. I am home most of the time. I appreciate all of the information.
I would never recommend baby bunnies, especially for beginners. You are much, much better off adopting a neutered, bonded pair from a rescue centre. Cheaper, much easier, much less stress.
 

Blue eyes

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Thanks for responding. I may rethink getting two at the same time. Initially I only wanted one bunny but once I found out they might get lonely that’s when I started to consider getting two. I am a stay at home mom so I have lots of time to dedicate to the bunny. I am home most of the time. I appreciate all of the information.
Having a pair isn't absolutely necessary. Indoor rabbits that are kept where they can interact with their human family can often do just fine as a "single" rabbit. (There's always the exception.) Outdoor rabbits simply don't get enough interaction (no matter the good intentions) so they do best in pairs.

So if you really only wanted one rabbit, that should be fine. Whether you decide on one or a pair, I'd encourage you to check out a rabbit rescue (different than generic shelter). They typically have already bonded pairs or singles. They are typically already fixed. Please don't think that "rescue rabbits" have something wrong with them. Quite the contrary. There are many advantages to getting a rabbit that is 6 months or older (and already fixed).

The following page on my website may help you as you consider your options:

edit: I just saw that you are also in AZ. If you are in the Phoenix area, I have gotten rabbits from Brambley Hedge Rabbit Rescue.
 

Floof

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Having a pair isn't absolutely necessary. Indoor rabbits that are kept where they can interact with their human family can often do just fine as a "single" rabbit. (There's always the exception.) Outdoor rabbits simply don't get enough interaction (no matter the good intentions) so they do best in pairs.

So if you really only wanted one rabbit, that should be fine. Whether you decide on one or a pair, I'd encourage you to check out a rabbit rescue (different than generic shelter). They typically have already bonded pairs or singles. They are typically already fixed. Please don't think that "rescue rabbits" have something wrong with them. Quite the contrary. There are many advantages to getting a rabbit that is 6 months or older (and already fixed).

The following page on my website may help you as you consider your options:

edit: I just saw that you are also in AZ. If you are in the Phoenix area, I have gotten rabbits from Brambley Hedge Rabbit Rescue.
I have decided to just start off with one. I had a male Holland Lop as a kid and am set on getting a baby male Holland Lop this go around as well. If I decide on getting a second rabbit once he’s been neutered I will contact your rescue to find him a friend. I realize it may be easier or cheaper to get an already bonded pair but it’s not what I’m looking for. I have plenty of funds saved up to care for my rabbit so the money issue is not a concern for me.

I have been calling around to some vets in my area but if you know of a good rabbit vet in the Prescott area that would be great. (Anything in Prescott, Prescott Valley, Chino or Dewey would be nice)
 

Diane R

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I have decided to just start off with one. I had a male Holland Lop as a kid and am set on getting a baby male Holland Lop this go around as well. If I decide on getting a second rabbit once he’s been neutered I will contact your rescue to find him a friend. I realize it may be easier or cheaper to get an already bonded pair but it’s not what I’m looking for. I have plenty of funds saved up to care for my rabbit so the money issue is not a concern for me.

I have been calling around to some vets in my area but if you know of a good rabbit vet in the Prescott area that would be great. (Anything in Prescott, Prescott Valley, Chino or Dewey would be nice)
It's not just about money. There is the worry and stress of neutering, there is the worry and stress of bonding,... Plus, babies are much harder to look after (not litter trained, etc.) and more fragile. Plus, you won't know their personality until they are older. Sometimes people want a baby rabbit because they think that somehow the bunny will like them more or will be more affectionate. That is not the case. In the UK, the rabbit welfare association and other animal welfare groups are calling for a ban on breeding, there are many thousands of rabbits in rescue centres waiting for a good home...
 

Floof

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I would never recommend baby bunnies, especially for beginners. You are much, much better off adopting a neutered, bonded pair from a rescue centre. Cheaper, much easier, much less stress.
While I appreciate your opinion I’m not one to choose something simply because it’s “easier”. In this life I enjoy new experiences and learning new things. I will choose the experience that is going to be most satisfying and fulfilling for me. I have the money and the time to provide a good home and I am looking to learn as I go even if it is difficult and stressful :)
 

Floof

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It's not just about money. There is the worry and stress of neutering, there is the worry and stress of bonding,... Plus, babies are much harder to look after (not litter trained, etc.) and more fragile. Plus, you won't know their personality until they are older. Sometimes people want a baby rabbit because they think that somehow the bunny will like them more or will be more affectionate. That is not the case. In the UK, the rabbit welfare association and other animal welfare groups are calling for a ban on breeding, there are many thousands of rabbits in rescue centres waiting for a good home...
I get it you are anti breeding. I am sorry that you don’t like my choice. Im not here to debate about this though. Hope you have a great day.
 

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