Return my bunny?

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Im coming late to this thread...but...i got a 7 month old rescue. I was lucky in that he was well cared for and only surrendered due to hay allergies. He was completely litter trained and tolerated handling. I also had the option of returning him, no questions asked. I gave him the spare room. Started with a large dog crate size space and expanded it as i got the room in order. I googled the hell out of how to care for a bunny and cried from week 2 to 4 because i was sure he hated me. Nothing would convince him to come near me. After daily sitting in his room, talking to him and offering treats he now follows me around. Nips at the hem of my pants for attention and head scratches. Throws his hay all over the room if i have the rare busy day and dont spend enough time with him.
We are talking about 10 to 12 hours a week for 4 to 5 weeks before he was completely comfortable with me. And continuing that to keep him happy.
I guess im saying bunnies take a lot of time. And it is on their terms. Either way you go good luck.
 

Julie&Bunnies

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I really think a rabbit isn't the right pet for you. Even though rabbits are really cute, they are not for everybody. the issues that you are having with your present rabbit, you are going to have with every rabbit. It is normal rabbit behavior. Some rabbits may be more extreme than others, but all of them will exhibit some of that behavior at times. Baby rabbits are especially hard to care for and often die, particularly if they are very young or come from a breeder or store which doesn't care about their welfare and only cares about making money. They will also have been suddenly and dramatically separated from their mother and family, and will have the same adjustment issues as your present bunny has. It is your decision whether or not to return the rabbit, but if you are not serious about keeping her, I think it's better done sooner than later.
Perhaps a different kind of pet would be a better fit. A hamster, a rat, a cute little mouse, etc. As much as I love my bunnies, they are not always easy to live with. And like I said, they are not for everyone.

Secondly, perhaps you could Foster or if not Foster, maybe just volunteer at a shelter or rescue. That way you could get to spend time with the animals but not have them at home where they might not get along with other family members. And you could get to know each of the animals and perhaps find one that is a good fit.
 
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Twila Animations

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Thank you all so so much! This has been very helpful for me. I'm planning to keep her another two weeks to see how she feels after a month of being here. My older sister explained to me that her rabbit was actually very well behaved because she got him at about three weeks old and so he was raised to sleep in a cage at night and be handled. I know many of you suggest I don't get a baby, but hey, I've lived with a dog who would constantly pee on the floor and now that he's 9 (coming 10), he even barfs on the carpet because he still eats things he shouldn't and I will clean it up myself too. I've had experience raising quite a few animals and I am very very willing to deal with raising a baby. I can go ask my sister for advice with dealing with a rabbit going through the teenage stage since she obviously had to go through that.
I am very very grateful for all your guys' help. Thank you! This is helping me lots with taking care of Blossom and if I decide she should go back, I'll be prepared for if I get a new one that will be used to this kind of housing.
 

Blue eyes

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My older sister explained to me that her rabbit was actually very well behaved because she got him at about three weeks old and so he was raised to sleep in a cage at night and be handled.
This is a common misconception. It is simply not true. Your sister just happened to get lucky with her rabbit. Early training does not do this. It was luck of the draw. People who happen to get an easy, docile rabbit will often attribute it to their training.
Founder of Bunny Bunch rescue, Caroline Charland, states, "People often think a rabbit must be held a lot as a baby in order to like being held as an adult. I don't find this true at all. Over the years, the Bunny Bunch rescue I founded has saved many mother and baby rabbits from shelters. All the babies were treated the same. When they became adults their personalities varied-- some liked to be held, some hated to be held and some tolerated being held."
(Rabbits USA 2014 magazine)
Along those same lines, each individual rabbit is different with how hormones affect it. Some rabbits experience all kinds of drastic behavioral changes while with others it is barely noticeable. So, no, your sister will likely be little to no help if you get a hormonal rabbit that doesn't happen to be exactly like hers in personality.

I hope she really didn't get a rabbit at 3 weeks of age. It many states it is illegal to sell a rabbit less than 8 weeks of age. A rabbit should still be nursing at 3 weeks of age.

Aside from all of this about baby rabbits, it isn't just the baby stage that is the reason so many of us are advising against getting a baby. The other reason for not getting a baby rabbit is that you aren't able to give proper care to an adult rabbit.

You aren't pleased with your current rabbit because of its behavior. Any other rabbit could very well behave the same - once an adult. But even if you happened to get the sweetest rabbit, your cage is still way too small and you've offered nothing but excuses for why you are not getting an ex-pen, not getting a larger cage, not getting appropriate food. :confused:

If you do return your current rabbit, you are talking about getting a new rabbit
"that will be used to this kind of housing." :eek: This doesn't make any sense. Rabbits need space. We've been trying to tell you in so many ways that your current cage is unacceptable for permanent housing. You state that you have no more room even for an ex-pen. Yet you are insisting on forcing some rabbit (either this one or another) to live in a cramped space for your pleasure. :(

Given your current situation, a rabbit simply isn't appropriate right now. I'd agree with @Julie&Bunnies
I really think a rabbit isn't the right pet for you. the issues that you are having with your present rabbit, you are going to have with every rabbit. It is normal rabbit behavior. It is your decision whether or not to return the rabbit, but if you are not serious about keeping her, I think it's better done sooner than later.
Perhaps a different kind of pet would be a better fit. A hamster, a rat, a cute little mouse, etc. As much as I love my bunnies, they are not always easy to live with. And like I said, they are not for everyone.
 

Mehidk

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Thank you all so so much! This has been very helpful for me. I'm planning to keep her another two weeks to see how she feels after a month of being here. My older sister explained to me that her rabbit was actually very well behaved because she got him at about three weeks old and so he was raised to sleep in a cage at night and be handled. I know many of you suggest I don't get a baby, but hey, I've lived with a dog who would constantly pee on the floor and now that he's 9 (coming 10), he even barfs on the carpet because he still eats things he shouldn't and I will clean it up myself too. I've had experience raising quite a few animals and I am very very willing to deal with raising a baby. I can go ask my sister for advice with dealing with a rabbit going through the teenage stage since she obviously had to go through that.
I am very very grateful for all your guys' help. Thank you! This is helping me lots with taking care of Blossom and if I decide she should go back, I'll be prepared for if I get a new one that will be used to this kind of housing.
I really don't think you're understanding everyone's concerns. Baby or not, you are disregarding the health and happiness of a rabbit because you are intent on having one simply because you want one, despite your current home situation. I can see that you care for your current rabbit otherwise you wouldn't suggest returning it to its original owner. However, if you truly want to be a responsible owner, you would heed everyone's suggestions and wait until your living situation changes. Otherwise, you may very well likely run into the same problems, or possibly with an even more aggressive one. What would you do if you run into the same problem, or something worse?
 

Mehidk

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Secondly, perhaps you could Foster or if not Foster, maybe just volunteer at a shelter or rescue. That way you could get to spend time with the animals but not have them at home where they might not get along with other family members. And you could get to know each of the animals and perhaps find one that is a good fit.
Volunteering at a local shelter is a great idea! Or even at a rabbit rescue - I know they enjoy having volunteers, but the catch is - it depends on what the minimum age requirement is. I know over here in California, the HRS headquarters requires you to be 16.
 

Hermelin

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Thank you all so so much! This has been very helpful for me. I'm planning to keep her another two weeks to see how she feels after a month of being here. My older sister explained to me that her rabbit was actually very well behaved because she got him at about three weeks old and so he was raised to sleep in a cage at night and be handled. I know many of you suggest I don't get a baby, but hey, I've lived with a dog who would constantly pee on the floor and now that he's 9 (coming 10), he even barfs on the carpet because he still eats things he shouldn't and I will clean it up myself too. I've had experience raising quite a few animals and I am very very willing to deal with raising a baby. I can go ask my sister for advice with dealing with a rabbit going through the teenage stage since she obviously had to go through that.
I am very very grateful for all your guys' help. Thank you! This is helping me lots with taking care of Blossom and if I decide she should go back, I'll be prepared for if I get a new one that will be used to this kind of housing.
So if you bunny it’s the aggressive bunny how would you train it. Would you feel sad if it took years training it to accept your touch and the bunny don’t turn out cuddly.

Myself have only been lucky getting really cuddly bunnies. But the work I have put down on some of them have been a lot. Even 2 years and I’m still working with one of my bunnies and trying to build up a better bond with him.

You can’t handle an adult bunny after a few weeks, would you be able to handle a kit that can take years. The easy bunnies to train was the bunnies I adopted as adults. All bunnies that have been from 8 weeks to 4 months have been a lot of work put down.

Still your cage it’s small and you need another housing. Even my bunnies will start chewing the bars after a few days in the cage. I think Odin can handle one month then he get restless and want to stretch his legs, even though he can binky and play in the cage.

I will ask you a real question, would you put a cat to spend hours in a cage where it can’t properly move?

Because that’s what you are doing towards your bunny. They can’t express themself as cats and dogs do. Some are really quiet then you have others that will truly show when they are unhappy and express themself. Like my grunting queen that will grunt and thump when she’s unhappy. That I can say it’s noisy, would your siblings like a drumming bunny :)

The personality of bunnies are so big and different. All bunny owners that really care for their bunnies will know how their personalities are and how they will react.

For example my own bunnies:

Odin: a clown that extremely kind and will never do loud sounds or bite anyone. But he’s not cuddle and a hard time being still. It becomes a real battle when it’s time to trim his nails.

Toste: Adventures but a scaredy-cat that easily get triggered to bite but love cuddles and can spend hours up in my arms. He will start making sounds when he’s not let out in the morning.

Liljs: She makes sounds everyday, bossy but cuddly. Just watch out for her grumpy days otherwise it will feel like you slammed a door on yourself when she bites.

As you can see Toste personality that love cuddly but easily get triggered to bite, they are two extreme and need me as an owner to read his signals. The first year with him I had not idea he was a bunny that love cuddles and snuggle up next to me. I would say he was a rabbit from hell out to get me.

Biting, chewing bars, throwing the water and food bowl, tipping the litter box and just attacking me whenever he got chance. I was scared of handling him and I’m an adult. I got him when he was 4 months and was neutered. So not an adult, I think the child family thought neutering would change his aggressive behavior. His first owner was 11 years old so just 2 years younger than you and this was not their first bunny. Here you can see a kit can turn out really different than what you expect it to be.

So my bunny Toste was far worse than your Blossom. Because his personality didn’t fit as a kids pet.

You can get an hamster or a gerbil. I would recommend rats but they need more space and the same go for chinchillas and hedgehogs which you don’t have space for. So a bunny will certainly won’t have the space.

I know how you feel wanting to own a pet, I had to wait until I was 19 to get my second pet again.

I can just see how small it can be in your room, myself have shared room with my little brother as a kid. But my room only fitted the bed and one tv, we had to have shelves to place all the toys to be placed on.

I have even lived with my cousins where they lived 8 people in a house with just a kitchen, bathroom, and one bedroom. My family spent a month with them so we where 12 people in a small space. Me, my brother and the youngest cousins shared the double bed sleeping like stacked sardines while the rest slept on the floor spread out in the house.

So I can perfectly know that small space can make it hard to make a bunny live good if it’s not free roaming. So it’s better to get a small real cage pet like hamsters or gerbil. Often hamster cages today should be around the normal pet shop cage size for bunnies, if you want to give them a proper housing for a real cage pet. This will you give you a concept of cage size. Look up hamster owners on youtube like ErinsAnimals, Victoria Raechel, Sniff the hamster and many more. You can see how big cages they have for their hamsters. And that just hamsters that are many sizes smaller than bunnies :)
 

thevanguard6

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Adoption prices are usually quite low (and an amazingly good deal because they spay/neuter their rabbits).
Since you're new to bunnies, here's some very important reading material (it's quite short, so it won't take you long to go over it -- and it'll make your life a lot easier):

One method for building an indoor enclosure:

Something to add to your enclosure:
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Volunteering at a local shelter is a great idea! Or even at a rabbit rescue - I know they enjoy having volunteers, but the catch is - it depends on what the minimum age requirement is. I know over here in California, the HRS headquarters requires you to be 16.
My local city farms allow volunteers over the age of 10. I was planning on volunteering this summer. But I’ll probably do it next summer because of Covid. You could try that too.
 
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