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Rambo my bunny.

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Vishal rajpal

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Hello, I am in need of advice.

My bunny Rambo is 4 years old, for past few years his teeth have been over growing, which has been causing him alot of trouble due to being in pain. We have had several treatment from the vets ie his teeth being snipped down and this being done, while he was under anesthatic( which I have been told by the vets every time I take his there, that it isn't good for his health) and he has been on pain relife medication for every time he has his treatment which is ever 2 to 3 months, he is also a very picky eater, doesn't checw on apple wood or any type of wood only refers to eat pallets or green veg

Two days ago when my wife took him to the vets, only to be told that one of his front tooth has fallen down and the other one is very loose, which fell out when vet touched it and they both don't have any roots.

She was also advised that he is in little bit of pain, but the amount of time we give pain need to give pain relife to him (priscrided by vet) might do his health damage in the longer run.

She also mention about putting him to sleep but not in direct way.

I just want to find out, if putting him to sleep the best option? Or keep treating him ever 2 to 3 months which involves him going under anesthetic.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards

Raj
 

JBun

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With him having lost two of his incisors, is it the incisors that are overgrowing, and did your vet ever suggest tooth extraction?

If the molars are overgrowing, do you feed hay and if so what type?

Your vet hinting at pts makes me think your vet may not be very rabbit savvy. If your rabbit isn't suffering, dental problems can usually be managed, even though it can be difficult at times. You may need to find a different vet more specialized in rabbits. You have some very good rabbit vets in the UK. If you want to post your general location, someone may have a suggestion. Or you can look at this list of owner recommended rabbit vets.
https://www.harcourt-brown.co.uk/vetfinder
 

Vishal rajpal

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We have taken Rambo to a specialist a few times, we live in Salisbury UK. Specialist suggested to change his diet and feed him hay which Rambo does not like to eat. He pretty much goes hungry for few day. It's a very hard situation where the bunny is a amazing pet but very picky as to what he likes to eat.
 

Vishal rajpal

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Insicor are the one that have fallen out, to make matter worse his back teeth don't really grow that well and pierce his gums. When ever we take him to the vet they endup treating all his teeth.
 

JBun

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Have you ever tried orchard grass hay? It won't fix the incisor problem, but it could help prevent molar spurs from developing. I know of a rabbit owner in the UK that was having to go to the vet for regular dentals every two months to have molar spurs filed down. She switched her rabbit to orchard grass and was able to go a whole year before her rabbit needed another dental for molar spurs. Orchard grass has a high silica content which is what helps wear the teeth down when the rabbit chews. I don't know if it will work for your rabbit but it seemed to work well for this one ladies rabbit. Of course that will depend on if your rabbit will eat the orchard grass or not. But some rabbits that don't care much for hay, really like the taste of orchard grass and will eat it when they would not eat any other type of hay.

For the remaining incisors, if it's in your budget, I would discuss the possibility of incisor removal for the remaining incisors and peg teeth. It could mean no more dentals needed, if you can also get your bun eating orchard grass and it helps prevent the molar spurs developing.

If it wasn't John Chitty at Anton Vets in Andover that you saw, I've read good recommendations for him if you are interested in looking into having the incisor extraction done.
http://antonvets.co.uk/exotics/189-2/

I wouldn't be considering pts if my rabbit was doing fine after having the dentals done and I could financially manage to continue having them done. If my rabbit was suffering and miserable even after having the dentals, and it was affecting his quality of life, and having the remaining incisors extracted wasn't an option or wouldn't help, then yes, maybe then pts would be a consideration for me.
 

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