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Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus type 2 In Arizona, Texas, and California

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CaityJuju

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I've messaged a few Vets in my city and none offer a vaccination for this virus. I have to keep checking, I live up in Canada, but we have had it reported in Vancouver. I don't plan on putting my rabbit outside because of this, but I read it can still be transmitted from your clothing.
 

jonboy26

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I've messaged a few Vets in my city and none offer a vaccination for this virus. I have to keep checking, I live up in Canada, but we have had it reported in Vancouver. I don't plan on putting my rabbit outside because of this, but I read it can still be transmitted from your clothing.
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I've messaged a few Vets in my city and none offer a vaccination for this virus. I have to keep checking, I live up in Canada, but we have had it reported in Vancouver. I don't plan on putting my rabbit outside because of this, but I read it can still be transmitted from your clothing.
I live in Missouri U.S. and long story but they are all dying. I had lots of wild hare rabbits die from this. I have read that any animal can transmit it but only effects rabbits
 

jonboy26

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I live in Missouri U.S. and long story but they are all dying. I had lots of wild hare rabbits die from this. I have read that any animal can transmit it but only effects rabbits
 

Anna R.

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i adopted a rabbit in 2018 when this was found on Orcas Island, WA. I live in WA and everyone was very scared and on highest alert of this. I had to come up with a plan to prevent the spread and risk of RHDV2 before I could adopt her.

This disease easily spreads fast on car tires and your shoes. As with COVID in humans you need to keep good hygiene and wash your hands before and after contact with your rabbits. NEVER let them outside. The number one thing was your shoes...you can carry in this disease on your shoes. You need to keep your "inside" shoes separate from your "outside" shoes. Never wear shoes you wore outside inside. You can wash your shoes with a bleach solution; but, they need to soak in it for a while. There was also a solution that was available from vets for washing your shoes and their cages etc. to prevent spread of the virus. I would ask your vet about that. They suggested having a "shoe washing" station at every entrance to your home or limit entrances to just one and have that washing station there. Keep your shoes outside the door so you aren't tracking the disease into your home. It spreads from rabbit to rabbit so quickly.
BE ALERT AND KEEP CLEAN. THIS IS A HORRIBLE DISEASE. we need to do everything we can to prevent it from spreading across the country. there is no vaccine available in the US for this.
 

Niomi

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This disease is not in my area yet. I am wondering what precautions need to be taken when buying hay? Can you still buy it from a farm?
 

Blue eyes

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A newer thread has been posted on this topic and can be found here"

BE ALERT AND KEEP CLEAN. THIS IS A HORRIBLE DISEASE. we need to do everything we can to prevent it from spreading across the country. there is no vaccine available in the US for this.
In those areas with outbreak, some vets have been able to request special permission to import the vaccines from Europe. So if you live in such an area, check with your vet (and check out the other link with more detailed info).

This disease is not in my area yet. I am wondering what precautions need to be taken when buying hay? Can you still buy it from a farm?
All hay comes from a farm. If a farm is from an area of known outbreak, then you'll have to see what precautions are being taken. Bagged, pet store hay may be harder to trace. Different manufacturers probably have different protocols as well. I haven't yet seen any thorough advice on how to know a hay is safe.
 

Bunnyman61

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I received a phone call from my exotics vet in the Sacramento area inviting me to have my two rabbits receive the Euro vaccine, which they will when it is available in about two weeks. I was advised that it is "at least 70% effective."
 

Blue eyes

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I received a phone call from my exotics vet in the Sacramento area inviting me to have my two rabbits receive the Euro vaccine, which they will when it is available in about two weeks. I was advised that it is "at least 70% effective."
Interesting that they contacted you. That's pretty advanced. Not surprised about the efficacy. The following info specifically about the vaccines is from HRS site on RHDV:

  • A vaccine is required annually to continue protection against RHDV.
  • Vaccination is expected to be effective for most rabbits – it may not prevent disease in 100% of cases, but if vaccinated, it helps rabbits survive if exposed to RHDV.
  • In veterinarian Dr. Frances Harcourt-Brown’s survey, some rabbits who died of RHDV (confirmed by PCR or histopathology) were reportedly current on a RHDV vaccine or had recently been vaccinated.
  • Biosecurity measures should be taken to protect rabbits, even after vaccination.
  • The two vaccines currently available for import to the US in 2020, Eravac (RHDV2) and Filavac (RHDV1 and RHDV2), are produced by infecting rabbits with RHDV in a laboratory and killing them to make liver-derived vaccines.
  • New in 2020: Nobiviac Myxo-RHD Plus is effective against RHDV1, RHDV2, and Myxomatosis, and is not produced in live animals, but in vitro (in a lab, in cell cultures). This vaccine is not currently eligible for import into the US because it contains a live Myxomatosis virus so would require evaluation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and because of export prohibitions by the manufacturer, MDS Animal Health, to the US and Canada.
and also...

  • The ERAVAC (Spain) and FILAVAC (France) vaccines are both given as one injection under the skin.
  • The onset of immunity for both is approximately one week after vaccination. The earliest ages the two vaccines can be given is 4 weeks for Eravac and 10 weeks for Filavac.
  • It is normal and common to have a temporary spike in body temperature after vaccination (the body making antibodies to the foreign virus that was injected).
  • Owners may also notice a nodule or lump at the vaccination site. The nodule is due to the rabbit’s body reaction to the substances that make up the injectable solution that carries the RHDV2 killed virus. The nodule is usually temporary and not life-threatening.
  • Please note that no vaccine can be considered 100% efficacious or that every rabbit that receives it will be guaranteed immunity to the disease. This is why biosecurity is vitally important as the first and most consistent method of protection.

Here's a sticky thread on this topic.
 

Bunnyman61

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Fantastic info, Blue Eyes...thanks so much for posting this for everyone to study. In our house, we don't allow the wearing of shoes, so hopefully that is already a decent start to protecting my two lovely bunnies.
 

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