New bunny need advice

Discussion in 'Bunny Chat' started by Kels, Oct 30, 2019.

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  1. Oct 30, 2019 #1

    Kels

    Kels

    Kels

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    Hi I wonder if some of the more experienced bunny owners can give me some advice , I have recently brought home our first bunny on Sunday he is 9 weeks old he seems to be doing absolutely fine eating,sleeping,cleaning all that a bunny does however trying to get him out his cage (he is house bunny) seems to be a little bit of a task we opened up cage after 24 hours and at first time he hopped out and had a little look around what was brill , however he doesn’t seem interested anymore when we do this and when we slowly go up to cage to try get him he hides in his hole I don’t want to scare him but I worry I case we don’t hold him enough he’s going to hate being touched. Any advice please?

    thankyou

    kelsey
     
  2. Oct 30, 2019 #2

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

    Alyssa and Bugs♡

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    First of all, welcome to the forum!

    Bunnies prefer their cages because that's their space. They feel safest in there and because you haven't had your bun that long, he'll get more comfortable with time. I wouldn't worry too much. You can try to coax him out with his food (stay away from treats for now) but don't feel bad if it doesn't work. Whenever he ventures out, you can try to approach him and if he just watches you and doesn't run away you can try to get on hislevel and let him sniff you. Bonding with your bunny takes time and persistence.

    What time does he get let out and put back into his cage?
     
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  3. Oct 30, 2019 #3

    Flakes

    Flakes

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    Dortmund still sometimes hides in his hole when I come visit. Usually I give him a few minutes and eventually he sees it is me and comes out to play.
     
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  4. Oct 30, 2019 #4

    Rosy

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    you can try opening up his cage and then backing off, watching from a distance. let him come out on his own. or you can try coaxing him out with treats... be patient tho. it may take some time f0r him to get used to you.
     
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  5. Oct 30, 2019 #5

    Hermelin

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    My bunny stopped hiding when he was 6 months old, he got easily scared of different things and disappeared under furnitures and bathtubs, so take your time and spend a lot of time with your bunny.

    Let him eat from your hand and slowly get used with you
     
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  6. Oct 30, 2019 #6

    Kels

    Kels

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    Hi Thankyou for reply we usual let him out when he more active or on night when we home he seems settled in now but just feel he doesn’t want come out cage we leave door open when we home but yeh suppose takes time do you think picking him up in cage be good idea or not ? X
     
  7. Oct 30, 2019 #7

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    Give him time and do not reach in to his cage to pick him up and force him out. This is very disconcerting for the little guy and will make him feel that his cage is not safe. He needs time. Don't worry at all thinking that you have to hold him often to make him like being handled. That isn't how it works with rabbits. Too much handling can even have the opposite effect.

    Founder of Bunny Bunch rescue, Caroline Charland, states, "People often think a rabbit must be held a lot as a baby in order to like being held as an adult. I don't find this true at all. Over the years, the Bunny Bunch rescue I founded has saved many mother and baby rabbits from shelters. All the babies were treated the same. When they became adults their personalities varied-- some liked to be held, some hated to be held and some tolerated being held."
    (Rabbits USA 2014 magazine)


    He's still young and figuring things out. Even adult rabbits can take time to get settled. I've had rabbits that were ready to explore the day they came home. I've had others that literally took months before venturing out of their cage. It just depends on the rabbit. They will come out when they feel ready and feel safe.

    For bonding with him, holding him isn't really the way to start. Have a limited area around his cage -- like an exercise pen. By limiting the space, it is less intimidating. You can sit in that area if you like. When he does venture out, ignore him. Let him approach you, even put his paws on you if he feels like it. But don't try to even pet him at first. You could try offering a pellet by hand. When offered by hand, he'll see them as a treat.

    Once he gets used to being rewarded for approaching you, then you can gradually try a few pettings. This is the slow method to gradually build that trust with your rabbit.
     
  8. Oct 31, 2019 #8

    April LD

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    Agree with Blue Eyes and would just add, talking. Talk to your bunny, say their name, what you are doing, good morning, do you want to come out...etc. Just so he gets used to your voice, you talking to him/interaction, etc. You can also lay next to the cage and talk, get them used to your scent...etc. But it does take patience...give it time. It's SO worth it! Good luck...send pics and updates on what works for you :)
     
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  9. Oct 31, 2019 #9

    TreasuredFriend

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    We adopted a 4 y.o. neutered boy from a shelter who cowered in fear when hands approached him. Purportedly he was housed in a chicken coop for a long time. There was definitely a fear/distrust factor before he would feel comfortable with us petting him or holding him. Gradually he learned to trust and warmed up to us, and bonded with his future spayed wifey bun. He became a snuggler as years went on.

    I'm glad you've given him a hidey box so he can observe, listen, acclimate to his new surroundings from his safe-haven area. Blue eyes knows the link to The Language of Lagomorphs website. Good info there, plus on https://myhouserabbit.com
     
  10. Oct 31, 2019 #10

    TreasuredFriend

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    As time goes on, Kels, you might want to try some of these tips in the Howcast video by Mary E. Cotter and Amy Sedaris - How to massage your rabbit:
     
  11. Oct 31, 2019 #11

    TreasuredFriend

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    Kels, do you have other pets in your home that your boy may not be used to? A talkative parrot, large dogs, etc.?
     
  12. Oct 31, 2019 #12

    Duckfarmer1

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    I agree with all of their answers..I have a rabbit who just lost all of her litermates to GI stasis and was traumatized..I needed to take special care so not to lose her too....so, besides handling her with kits gloves, going slowly...rubbing my fingers and letting her smell me...plus..once you do have the bunny..rub him all over you pr face a bit so he gets your smell..he’ll learn to sense you..anyway...until he knows you...it would be ok to offer him dandelions....or kale, or dark green lettuce...I use dandelion..it’s free and accessible! But it helps move them out of their little space and you can bond...enjoy that bunny baby!
     

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