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My rabbit's not a chewer. Will she have tooth problems?

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overhear

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My newly adopted bunny, Joey, isn't a big chewer and tho it's great not to have to worry so much about her destroying the house I am wondering if this will cause her tooth problems in the future. My previous bunny was a chew-aholic and loved the ecotrition snak shak logs. The vet always said that his teeth were in perfect shape even though they'd never been trimmed, which I assumed was from gnawing on the snak shak logs. But this bunny has no interest in them and more or less ignored the wood sticks I gave her to munch on. Should I be worried about my new bunny's teeth?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!
 

Watermelons

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Teeth problems tend to be more genetic. Some breeds have more issues then others. And hay eating plays a decent part too. Is he a big hay eater?
Those snack logs are garbage so its okay if he doesnt chew them.
Seagrass mats. Balsa. Palm toys. Vine balls. Much better and safer chewing and playing options.
 

overhear

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Teeth problems tend to be more genetic. Some breeds have more issues then others. And hay eating plays a decent part too. Is he a big hay eater?
Those snack logs are garbage so its okay if he doesnt chew them.
Seagrass mats. Balsa. Palm toys. Vine balls. Much better and safer chewing and playing options.
I don't know what breed she is, but would love some insight. See pic, attached.

After some adjustment she's now eating plenty of hay. Speaking of garbage, I recently ordered this bunny chew toy from Amazon but then was too worried about the quality to give it to her. I'd appreciate any thoughts on whether it would be healthy for rabbits.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082G55GGS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Preitler

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They wear their teeth not so much by chewing hard stuff, but when eating grass, hay, leafy greens and such stuff that gets cut into small pieces with their front teeth. Those teeth work like scissors and rub at each other - keeping them sharp by wearing each other down. That's where genetics come into play, when they are not lined up properly that doesn't work, and then they need to be trimmed.
Chew toys are great, don't do any harm, I think. I prefer to give them branches, it plays a big role what trees or bushes they come from. Ash, willow, forsithia, apple, most fruit trees actually, are the favorites of mine. They nibble on hornbeam and hasel too, but less enthusiastic. Spruce and pine (the local european variants) get's gnawed from time to time, it's a rather small addition to their diet though.
 
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Blue eyes

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I recently ordered this bunny chew toy from Amazon but then was too worried about the quality to give it to her. I'd appreciate any thoughts on whether it would be healthy for rabbits.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082G55GGS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I don't see any ingredients listed for those compressed alfalfa pieces. If it is just alfalfa, it's fine for occasional offering. If the cakes have molasses and other fillers, then not so great.

As explained, it's really the chewing of hay or grass that causes them to move their jaw in that figure 8 motion that grinds those teeth down. That, and the fact that grass/hay has silica which acts like sand to sand down the teeth. Chew toys are just a diversion or toy. Most of my rabbits ignored all chew toys.
 

overhear

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They wear their teeth not so much by chewing hard stuff, but when eating grass, hay, leafy greens and such stuff that gets cut into small pieces with their front teeth. Those teeth work like scissors and rub at each other - keeping them sharp by wearing each other down. That's where genetics come into play, when they are not lined up properly that doesn't work, and then they need to be trimmed.
Chew toys are great, don't do any harm, I think. I prefer to give them branches, it plays a big role what trees or bushes they come from. Ash, willow, forsithia, apple, most fruit trees actually, are the favorites of mine. They nibble on hornbeam and hasel too, but less enthusiastic. Spruce and pine (the local european variants) get's gnawed from time to time, it's a rather small addition to their diet though.
Very helpful! Thanks!
 

Happy Hollands

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Make sure any [chew] toys are made out of untreated wood or hay. THIS is an amazing toy set I think your bun may enjoy, as it has quite the variety of items to chew/explore.

Also, I would like to mention that orchard hay is the most abrasive type of hay (more so than Timothy), so if you're worried about your rabbit having overgrown teeth, this is one way to help prevent it :)
 

Niomi

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I agree with Watermelons that is has a lot to do with genetics. Eating hay does help. Pellets and compressed cubes don't work as well even though they are made of hay, because they fall apart when the rabbit bites on them, and so it isn't the same chewing workout for the teeth.
 

NYAngela

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My newly adopted bunny, Joey, isn't a big chewer and tho it's great not to have to worry so much about her destroying the house I am wondering if this will cause her tooth problems in the future. My previous bunny was a chew-aholic and loved the ecotrition snak shak logs. The vet always said that his teeth were in perfect shape even though they'd never been trimmed, which I assumed was from gnawing on the snak shak logs. But this bunny has no interest in them and more or less ignored the wood sticks I gave her to munch on. Should I be worried about my new bunny's teeth?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!
My buns both really liked hanging chew toys, they offer more resistance than the others. I love this Etsy shop. (Just avoid the ones with pumice)

Chinvilla Natural 7 Hanging Chinchilla Chew Toy Apple | Etsy
 

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