My Rabbit Question Thread

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Cluckin'Bunny

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Hi all,

I am completely new to rabbit keeping (I don't even have a rabbit yet) and so I have so many questions. I will have this thread for asking everything so I don't need to post a new thread every time I have a question. (But sometimes I will, it depends.)
Thanks!
- Cluckin'Bunny
 

Cluckin'Bunny

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Thanks guys!

My first one is: Is it true that small rabbits tend to be more aggressive, mean, etc?
 

Hermelin

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Thanks guys!

My first one is: Is it true that small rabbits tend to be more aggressive, mean, etc?
Myself have owned/own 3 dwarf bunnies and met a lot more. I never found them more aggressive than others, it all depends on the bunnies personality.

What I find are that smaller breeds are a lot more playful than giant bunnies. But I’m not going to make that assumption for all the bunnies. Wrong breeding can lead to aggressive bunnies or traumas. But it all comes to the bunnies personality. I would never say a bunny is mean, some are more independent, skittish or extremely dominant etc.

This is my smallest dwarf bunny:
IMG_3089.jpg

He’s the same breed as my first ever owned bunny and have the perfect personality. Even though he can’t be still as long as my holland lop and giant. When I feel down, he will snuggle up in my arms or flop next to me. I just need to pick him up when I need a bit comfort and he will make it comfortable with me.

Myself own a once aggressive bunny, that’s my holland lop. The only down side he easily triggers to attack if I don’t read his signals.
 
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Apollo’s Slave

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Thanks guys!

My first one is: Is it true that small rabbits tend to be more aggressive, mean, etc?
it depends on how the rabbit is raised so no. But for me... the smallest rabbit I’ve owned was a Netherland dwarf and he was cage aggressive for some reason, but he ended up being really sweet! He was the friendliest and sweetest thing I’ve had.
 

Blue eyes

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Aggressive or mean, sweet or cuddly... any breed can be those. The smaller ones do tend to have more energy. If they are deprived of enough running around time, they could get frustrated, but that wouldn't be because they are dwarf. :)
 

Hermelin

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Netherland dwarf and he was cage aggressive for some reason, but he ended up being really sweet! He was the friendliest and sweetest thing I’ve had.
The reason why I own a netherland dwarf because all I have met and owned have been the friendliest and sweetest. But, they still have the playful side with a lot of energy

I also heard the rumor small breeds are an aggressive breed and extremly skittish. I might think it comes with how many people think because of the small size it’s a perfect pet for a kid. Also you get a pull to pick them up which many bunnies don’t tolerate without training. It’s a bit like how some people treat a small dog breed compared with a large breed.

I can see it at how my parents treat my bunnies, with the smallest they pick him up and give him kisses while the larger breed they are more respectful towards them. They respect their space and interact with them when they want to interact. While for the smallest it can be a bit forced, I’m just lucky he loves attentions.

Myself also get that pull towards my netherland dwarf to pick him up and give him kisses. Specially when he stands on his back legs and his big watery eyes stare up towards me.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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The reason why I own a netherland dwarf because all I have met and owned have been the friendliest and sweetest. But, they still have the playful side with a lot of energy

I also heard the rumor small breeds are an aggressive breed and extremly skittish. I might think it comes with how many people think because of the small size it’s a perfect pet for a kid. Also you get a pull to pick them up which many bunnies don’t tolerate without training. It’s a bit like how some people treat a small dog breed compared with a large breed.

I can see it at how my parents treat my bunnies, with the smallest they pick him up and give him kisses while the larger breed they are more respectful towards them. They respect their space and interact with them when they want to interact. While for the smallest it can be a bit forced, I’m just lucky he loves attentions.

Myself also get that pull towards my netherland dwarf to pick him up and give him kisses. Specially when he stands on his back legs and his big watery eyes stare up towards me.
I found that Hugo (my Netherland) was really scared when I first adopted him. He wouldn’t take food from me at all until I put it on the floor near him. It took about three months for him to calm down and after that he was amazing! He would go up to people and almost beg to be pet. He became so friendly.
 

Cluckin'Bunny

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Thanks so much guys! My next question: If I do decide to have my rabbit outside a little, would a bigger breed survive better?
 

Hermelin

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Thanks so much guys! My next question: If I do decide to have my rabbit outside a little, would a bigger breed survive better?
Myself would just say it depends on the bunny but all bunnies can handle living outside, size dosen’t matter. Some bunnies handle it better than others.
 

Cluckin'Bunny

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Would a long haired Bunny do better in winter? Then shed in summer? Just gathering info. :)
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Thanks so much guys! My next question: If I do decide to have my rabbit outside a little, would a bigger breed survive better?
I don’t think it depends on the breed. As long as you have a good home it should be okay for most breeds. So when your building the hutch if you decided to have an outdoor bunny, you should think about things like how much rain your area, how cold winters get.
 

Mariam+Theo

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I have a short-haired Mini Rex who is outside and he loves it! I would just be careful with long-haired breeds because of fur blockages. Theo just recently got a fur blockage even though he is a short-haired and it was terrifying. It ended up causing him to go into GI stasis (which you need to read this link on: https://rabbit.org/gastrointestinal-stasis-the-silent-killer-2/) and he is still recovering.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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I have a short-haired Mini Rex who is outside and he loves it! I would just be careful with long-haired breeds because of fur blockages. Theo just recently got a fur blockage even though he is a short-haired and it was terrifying. It ended up causing him to go into GI stasis (which you need to read this link on: https://rabbit.org/gastrointestinal-stasis-the-silent-killer-2/) and he is still recovering.
aww :( I’m glad he’s getting better
 

Blue eyes

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What is your climate like? How cold are winter nights? How hot are summer days? People generally don't sit outside in a rabbit enclosure for hours every day (in rain, in snow, in cold weather, in hot weather) which means an outdoor rabbit can be quite lonely. Even if you sat out there for 3 hours per day (not really realistic in all weather) that still leaves bunny with 21 hours every day of being alone.

This is the main reason I encourage indoor housing. Indoors you can spend that time with your rabbit when you aren't specifically interacting with him. For example, if you are studying or on the computer but sitting near the rabbit, the rabbit sees that as 'together time.' If he is hopping about the room while you watch TV, that is 'together time.' So indoors, you get to see, observe, and interact with your rabbit far more often and are more likely to build a true bond with him/her.

As for breeds for outside, can't answer that without knowing your climate. I do know lop-eared rabbits have a harder time staying cool in hot weather because rabbits lose body heat through their ears. Those with up ears can do that more easily.
 

Cluckin'Bunny

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What is your climate like? How cold are winter nights? How hot are summer days? People generally don't sit outside in a rabbit enclosure for hours every day (in rain, in snow, in cold weather, in hot weather) which means an outdoor rabbit can be quite lonely. Even if you sat out there for 3 hours per day (not really realistic in all weather) that still leaves bunny with 21 hours every day of being alone.

This is the main reason I encourage indoor housing. Indoors you can spend that time with your rabbit when you aren't specifically interacting with him. For example, if you are studying or on the computer but sitting near the rabbit, the rabbit sees that as 'together time.' If he is hopping about the room while you watch TV, that is 'together time.' So indoors, you get to see, observe, and interact with your rabbit far more often and are more likely to build a true bond with him/her.

As for breeds for outside, can't answer that without knowing your climate. I do know lop-eared rabbits have a harder time staying cool in hot weather because rabbits lose body heat through their ears. Those with up ears can do that more easily.
Winter nights can get a but below freezing on average. Summer is around... I don't know.... 65 degrees? Oh and don't worry! This rabbit will be getting LOTS of attention.
 

Blue eyes

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Your weather sounds suitable for outdoor housing. However, if you house outdoors, then start looking for already-bonded pairs (already fixed and already bonded). You need a pair if they are going to be outside. They have to be fixed. Don't let anyone tell you a young sibling pair are bonded. They have to both be fixed already.
 

Cluckin'Bunny

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Your weather sounds suitable for outdoor housing. However, if you house outdoors, then start looking for already-bonded pairs (already fixed and already bonded). You need a pair if they are going to be outside. They have to be fixed. Don't let anyone tell you a young sibling pair are bonded. They have to both be fixed already.
Ok, but why do I need a pair if it is outside?
 
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