7 Month Old Female Rabbit Acting Aggressive Toward Other Rabbits.

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ISAC QUIN HOOER

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7 Month Old Female Rabbit Acting Aggressive Toward Other Rabbits. it was always the nicest rabbit we had on our farm. A few days ago it started and has not stoped yet.
Rabbits rarely make sounds so we thought it was wired that he has making "snort / growl" sound when he's chasing other rabbits and when picked up. he also pulls out hair from other rabbits.

P.S. - he was a runt that we cared for.

we're new to raising rabbits so any help would be nice.
 

John Wick

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She is going through puberty, thus her hormones are making her act that way. Please separate her (or him; unsure sex based on the pronoun use?) from your other rabbits to prevent injury. Also, please check your other rabbits for any potential injuries. Note that any rabbits you have together who are not spayed/neutered may begin acting aggressive towards others as well, in addition to potential pregnancy.

Young rabbits tend to get along with other rabbits because their hormones are not yet active. These 'nice' and 'cuddly' relationships are called "baby bonds", also known as the "false bond": Bonding Bunnies

Unsure of your goal for raising rabbits, but if you are interested in bonding your rabbits so they get along, you can see here for an overview of how to bond rabbits, once all have been spayed/neutered: Bonding Archives | BinkyBunny
 

ISAC QUIN HOOER

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She is going through puberty, thus her hormones are making her act that way. Please separate her (or him; unsure sex based on the pronoun use?) from your other rabbits to prevent injury. Also, please check your other rabbits for any potential injuries. Note that any rabbits you have together who are not spayed/neutered may begin acting aggressive towards others as well, in addition to potential pregnancy.

Young rabbits tend to get along with other rabbits because their hormones are not yet active. These 'nice' and 'cuddly' relationships are called "baby bonds", also known as the "false bond": Bonding Bunnies

Unsure of your goal for raising rabbits, but if you are interested in bonding your rabbits so they get along, you can see here for an overview of how to bond rabbits, once all have been spayed/neutered: Bonding Archives | BinkyBunny
Thank you for your reply. we will take what you said into account.
Thanks!
 

Preitler

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Uhm, it would help a lot if you give info about what sex are those rabbits, and how many.

If it's a group of bucklings I would seperate this one, it'S not going to get better and might end with severly injured rabbits. Advice on does would be different.
 

Preitler

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Ah, just read the thread title again, got confused by the use of "he" in the text :)

Well, yes, hormones in action and sorting out their hierachy. Seems like you've got a bigheaded girl there. It's a female only group I reckon, how many?
I raise my doelings with my two does, works well and there is rarely any fur plucking, some humping now and then but normally by one of the old does to make clear who is boss. Not always easy to watch, but does have several steps of escalation and unlike bucks rarely go into a full out fight in such situations. Other situations are different, like when 2 does that aren't used to the immediate presence of each other meet, like having been seperated by a fence.
I think it's important that they have enough space, set up so that they can get out of each others eyes if they fell like it. Each of my duos has two hutches, connected with a tunnel, and they get a lot of garden time to work off excess energy. Currently that's 2 does+6 doelings.

How you proceed depends on your plans, if you want to keep them together seperating would be the wrong move, reintroducing them might not work. I do not seperate rabbits I want to keep together, if there is trouble I give them more space, they have their moods now and then.
 

Momma Luvbun

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I have successfully bonded 2 females to the same male.
When I started, my first girl and the male were not fixed. She was about 3 he was about 8-10 months old. I kept him in a large dog crate and let him out when my girl was occupied and after a couple of weeks they went in for fixing. After that they were both quarentined to their "safe houses" for duration of their post op recoop (female 14ish days, male 8-10 days)
Then I slowly let them meet eachother when I knew they were both healed. There was a bit of dominance issue (mounting and chasing) but that subsided quickly.
After my girl passed away it took me a year to be open to another bun for my widowed male.

My next girl was approximately 6-10 months old and unfixed so she had to be quarentined when I brought her home, because I didn't want her acting differently from before her spay to after, for the sake of my little fella. I didn't want my girl to be aggressive with hormones and my little fella thinking "forget this" and now t give her a chance when they got freedom to mingle.
After her spay and post op recoop, she slowly let her out and again it went as smoothly as I could have hoped. They have been together now happily for 2 years 💕
 

ISAC QUIN HOOER

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Uhm, it would help a lot if you give info about what sex are those rabbits, and how many.

If it's a group of bucklings I would seperate this one, it'S not going to get better and might end with severly injured rabbits. Advice on does would be different.
Sorry for the typo's LOL:p. The one in my original post was one of the females that was in the litter. We originally got 2 "males", than found out one January morning that we had a surprise litter of 1 male and 5 females! The seller had actually sold us 1 male and 1 female. we had kept the females (including the mother) together until the aggressive behavior started. we are REALLY new to raising rabbits, so forgive us for the mistakes🐰.
Thanks!
 

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