Taking home a new rabbit on a 2 hour car ride?

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by Solar, Feb 17, 2018.

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  1. Feb 17, 2018 #1

    Solar

    Solar

    Solar

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    Hi, I am fairly new at this. I'm thinking of adopting after I'm done my final exams so I have time to spend with the bun. I was considering adopting from this well-loved farm that happens to be 2 to 3 hours from my house but I am scared such a long ride will affect the new bun. Has anyone tried to take their new rabbit home on similar conditions? Should I just consider a closer place? Any tips or shared experience would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Feb 17, 2018 #2

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    My rabbit had to travel 7 hours when I just got him, we traveled by car. Fill the travel cage with hay and have a water bowl or bottle and take a pause somewhere so they can drink. My rabbit was quite scared and only nibbled a little on the hay and drank a little water. But when I got home he had time to settle in the cage and started to eat. The first car drive it’s quite stressful if they aren’t used but 2-3 hours will be no problem. My rabbit was 8 weeks and had just learned to eat normal food, I think it will be easier with older rabbits specially when they are two.

    My rabbit have now traveled quite often on trains and car for at least 4 hours and he just sit and eat hay and drink a little water and demanding attention during the ride.
     
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  3. Feb 19, 2018 #3

    Rabbitats

    Rabbitats

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    Use a small to medium cat carrier with solid walls and top. They actually prefer to travel in small cramped (to us) quarters, it's the instinctive comfort zone of the 'burrow'.

    If it's a long trip, we put wood pellets on the bottom of the carrier and layers of newspapers on top. If they soil the paper, you can just life a few layers off for a fresh dry start.

    We'll put hay and wet veggies in the carrier, but no water. They can get enough hydration from the veggies without having spilled water or water bottle spouts sticking through the door.

    Hope this helps!

    Sorelle
     
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  4. Feb 19, 2018 #4

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    My friend did this and the breeder gave them a cardboard box with bedding and hay.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2018 #5

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    If you are using wet veggies make sure the rabbit it’s used with those veggies and can eat them, a change of diet, a stressfull car ride and a new home aren’t great for the stomach for the rabbit :3
     
  6. Feb 19, 2018 #6

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

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    We moved with 17 rabbits from CA to here--12 hours driving time and kept them in their hutches with food, water, etc., and everyone was fine.
     

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