Sneezing (thymoma found as cause)

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JBun

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The dosage for prednisone for rabbits that I'm finding, is 0.5-2mg/kg, referenced from Varga and Blackwells vet books. Though you should always double check any references yourself, and check with your vet as well.


I don't know if you've had a chance to look through the link and references in that link, that I shared above, but if you haven't then reading through some of them may help you in making the decision as to what the best treatment will be for your rabbit, as some of the references discuss the pros and cons of each treatment option.

This is a link to a scientific article about the outcomes of the different thymoma treatments. Just be aware that being a scientific article, it discusses potentially sensitive topics. Based on the results reported in these articles, unless you have an extremely experienced rabbit vet doing the surgery, if I were in your position surgery would be my last consideration due to the high mortality rate.



And here are some personal accounts from past RO members.

 

Ampee

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Another day passes by due to the Vet not sending me the dosage.....:(
 

Moonshadow

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If you don’t hear anything tomorrow, I’d just go by @JBun’s dosage since it’s probably a safe amount. I can’t understand how they gave you the medicine without the dosage honestly😓
 

Ampee

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Yeah, I'm really pissed off. I called their HQ, messaged the vet online, no response.....
The receptionist answered it, but she told me that she cant tell anything to the vet since the vet is busy.
Also, still no reply from the Radiation team in Wien.

Meh :(
 
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Moonshadow

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They seem so unresponsive that I personally wouldn’t trust them to do the surgery, not at this point 😓

I don’t know if you had time to read the articles or past members experiences yet with thymoma treatment from @JBun’s link, but one past member opted to just use the steroid. Her bun was 7 and the doctor guessed she’d last 6 more months on it (this was 2013). Her bunny got to age 10 on just steroid treatment based on the last post on the forum.

Another owner decided for radiation treatment (no surgery though) since their bunny (I think age 3) would not have told tolerated the injectible steroid treatment. The radiation apparently had immediate helpful effects and at home was happy and acting normal. That bun lasted slightly longer than a year more but ultimately passed from effects from radiation (the thymoma had almost disappeared).

In both cases, the owners knew they had made the right choice for their individual bunny to give them the longest, most comfortable life they would have. They had no regrets. You know your bunny best so I’m sure you’ll choose the method that works best for your bun.
 

Ampee

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They seem so unresponsive that I personally wouldn’t trust them to do the surgery, not at this point 😓

I don’t know if you had time to read the articles or past members experiences yet with thymoma treatment from @JBun’s link, but one past member opted to just use the steroid. Her bun was 7 and the doctor guessed she’d last 6 more months on it (this was 2013). Her bunny got to age 10 on just steroid treatment based on the last post on the forum.

Another owner decided for radiation treatment (no surgery though) since their bunny (I think age 3) would not have told tolerated the injectible steroid treatment. The radiation apparently had immediate helpful effects and at home was happy and acting normal. That bun lasted slightly longer than a year more but ultimately passed from effects from radiation (the thymoma had almost disappeared).

In both cases, the owners knew they had made the right choice for their individual bunny to give them the longest, most comfortable life they would have. They had no regrets. You know your bunny best so I’m sure you’ll choose the method that works best for your bun.
Yeah I read those. Thank you!
Our Bunny got picked up several times during the years due to frequent stasis episodes, where we gave him probio, Critical care and painkillers so she is kind of used to it. She hates it neverthless though.

We just got response so we are starting the treatment now.
 

Ampee

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BTW, 1/4 of the tablet 2x a day (if anyone is curious), also we are administering "Quamatel" (same amount) for "stomach protection".
One dose is in...fingers crossed!

On a "side note" (not so side note at all): yesterday evening her "googly eye" really increased. I mean I could see that it wasnt like that before... :(

Also I feel like I need to share some screens about her (Since this whole topic is about her). If thats ok?
 

Ampee

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Sooo, She was drinking and I heard some "solid stuff eating sound" (like when they are eating pelletts) and then this came out from her mouth:

309559091_3261480564073544_2498898341910295550_n.jpg

Could this be teeth? (She was eating before drinking so it could be some stuff from hay?) (Toothpick for size reference)
I can upload more images about it.
 

Ampee

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Could this be a "back" teeth? As far as I could check the frontal ones are ok.
And of course: We didn't step/kick her. She didn't fall off from anywhere etc.....
309430058_1255145208383782_6399356923177435189_n.jpg

310261983_410601641042110_1885464710401158260_n.jpg
 
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JBun

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Could be a fractured tooth. Not sure what else it could be. Teeth can fracture from running into things, pulling on things with the teeth, biting onto something hard, or they can weaken or loosen, particularly in older rabbits. When your bun is next at the vet, or if you notice eating difficulties, definitely have your vet do a thorough dental exam.
 

Ampee

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Could be a fractured tooth. Not sure what else it could be. Teeth can fracture from running into things, pulling on things with the teeth, biting onto something hard, or they can weaken or loosen, particularly in older rabbits. When your bun is next at the vet, or if you notice eating difficulties, definitely have your vet do a thorough dental exam.
She has been eating since: Hay, oxbow pellett, oxbow digestive support.
Yeah I will definetley do the teeth checkup. My only concern is that they only do it with anesthezia. I don't know how risky it is with Thymoma. (The anesthezia).
 

JBun

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They should be able to do a concious exam using an otoscope with the longer specula(helps get further into the mouth to see the back teeth).
 

Ampee

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They should be able to do a concious exam using an otoscope with the longer specula(helps get further into the mouth to see the back teeth).
They don't do that. I asked them specifically about this. "No we are not doing it: Bunny could bite on it which can cause broken teeth, and you can't do a proper examination like this"
 

JBun

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Yes, under sedation is the best way to get a proper look at the mouth. But just as a general exam to see if there's a broken tooth, and with your rabbit having a thymoma and at risk, I can't imagine why they say it's a problem. That's how my vet always does a general dental exam(with no suspected dental issues occurring), and I have never had it be a problem with any rabbit biting down hard enough to fracture a tooth, unless a vet were doing something incorrectly. The rabbit simply can't bite down hard with the specula in their mouth. Plus the specula goes in between the teeth, which would mean they shouldn't be able to bite down on it at all if it's placed correctly by the vet. But I guess there's nothing you can do about that, if they won't agree to do a concious exam.
 

Ampee

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Yes, under sedation is the best way to get a proper look at the mouth. But just as a general exam to see if there's a broken tooth, and with your rabbit having a thymoma and at risk, I can't imagine why they say it's a problem. That's how my vet always does a general dental exam(with no suspected dental issues occurring), and I have never had it be a problem with any rabbit biting down hard enough to fracture a tooth, unless a vet were doing something incorrectly. The rabbit simply can't bite down hard with the specula in their mouth. Plus the specula goes in between the teeth, which would mean they shouldn't be able to bite down on it at all if it's placed correctly by the vet. But I guess there's nothing you can do about that, if they won't agree to do a concious exam.
Yeah :( , I will try to discuss it with the vet beforehand. Also she recommended a xray to check on the thymoma in 4 weeks, so maybe we can do both at the same time.
 

Moonshadow

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Yeah :( , I will try to discuss it with the vet beforehand. Also she recommended a xray to check on the thymoma in 4 weeks, so maybe we can do both at the same time.
Even when my bun had a broken jaw, my vet very carefully used that scope @JBun described to look in his mouth while he was conscious. She bunny burritoed him and kind of angled it to look in so he didn’t chew on it. At my last appointment she even had the intern using it on him for practice (his jaw was healed by then). He nibbled on it with the intern trying but nothing that would damage his teeth. So weird your vet refuses to even try...
 

Ampee

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Even when my bun had a broken jaw, my vet very carefully used that scope @JBun described to look in his mouth while he was conscious. She bunny burritoed him and kind of angled it to look in so he didn’t chew on it. At my last appointment she even had the intern using it on him for practice (his jaw was healed by then). He nibbled on it with the intern trying but nothing that would damage his teeth. So weird your vet refuses to even try...
Yes, I totally agree. Can't really do anything. I will however try once more, arguing that Thymoma is blabla....
Maybe she will change her mind. (I think this is an exceptional situation)

Now I'm struggling with my other Bunny as well (The male one) :(

I'm a bad parent.
 

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