Recommended Housing Sizes

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Blue eyes

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While we all know bigger is better when it comes to rabbit housing, what would be considered too small? Well those minimum recommendations can vary greatly depending on who is answering.

Below is a sampling of various recommendations from rabbit societies and vets. One thing they all agree upon is that a typical store bought rabbit cage is not even close to the bare minimum for proper size.

Rabbit Welfare Association & Fund (RWAF):
We recommend a minimum area of 10ft x 6ft x 3ft high (3m x 2m x 1m) for a pair of average sized rabbits, regardless if they live indoors or outside. This can include the sleeping quarters, and makes up a footprint (accessible area of the ground or floor) of 3m x 2m.

The upper floor of a two-storey hutch does NOT count towards the footprint. Similarly, whilst raised platforms, tunnels and other connected areas are great for enrichment and are actively encouraged, they do not count towards the footprint.

Please note that the 10 ft length (3m) is important as this allows the rabbits to run and not just take a few hops. We sometimes see 60 sq ft of space being referred to as the minimum guideline, but this does not always meet the minimum guidelines, for example 8ft x 8ft would be 64ft, but there is not a 10 ft (3m) length in that set up.


The House Rabbit Society
Bigger is better! A rabbit's home should be at least 4-6 times the size of your bunny when he's entirely stretched out - more if he is confined for a large amount of the day. Enclosure sizes also should be decided in conjunction with the amount of exercise time and space the rabbit has. One guideline to go by is at least 8 square feet of enclosure space combined with at least 24 square feet of exercise space, for 1-2 rabbits, in which the rabbit(s) can run and play at least 5 hours per day.

Dana M. Krempels, Ph.D.
A rabbit needs at least four hours per day of running time inside the house or in a fenced yard, supervised by a human to prevent attack by predators. Our house rabbits are often never caged, but if you find it necessary to keep your rabbit confined while you are away, then be sure the cage is at least 3' x 4' on the floor dimensions, and at least 2' high, so the rabbit can comfortably stand on her haunches to look around. Large breeds (more than 6 lbs.) need an even larger hutch to be comfortable and healthy.
 
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