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Outside Bunny Essentials

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Cosmic11

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Hi all!
I was wondering what the essentials are for keeping rabbits outside. I am in the Bay Area and it doesn't get too cold here in the winter. Can you recommend some products? What is a good diet for bunnies? What is good bedding? Thanks!
 

Blue eyes

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Winters there in the Bay Area aren't going to get too cold for a rabbit. They like the cool weather. You may want to take a peek at the following thread that shows examples of different outdoor housing set-ups.

As for diet, it depends on the age of your rabbit. Here is a link to a page on my website that explains proper diet:
 

Cosmic11

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Winters there in the Bay Area aren't going to get too cold for a rabbit. They like the cool weather. You may want to take a peek at the following thread that shows examples of different outdoor housing set-ups.

As for diet, it depends on the age of your rabbit. Here is a link to a page on my website that explains proper diet:
What are some other essentials that I need? I was thinking of getting a mini lop bunny. How many should I get? If I get them as babies, should I grow them out inside and then move them outside? Thanks!
EDIT: How much room inside the shelter and in a run would mini lops need?
 

Lucas the Bun 💕🐇

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Hi,

Just thought I’d add this for thought.
You can definitely keep your rabbits outside, but there are more responsibilities when keeping them outside as opposed to inside (my opinion, not meant to offend anyone).

- Harder to watch out for GI stasis and illnesses, as you may have to deal with mosquitos, rain, hot weather, ect. when going to check on them.

- If these are going to be pet rabbits I would suggest keeping them inside ( easier for you to interact & build a bond *not saying it can’t be done though, just takes more effort then walking across the hall to visit*

- Its easier for rabbits to get flystrike outside than inside

- Hot weather is something to consider especially with Angora, Lionhead, and American rabbits also lops as it’s harder to regulate heat with those adorable floppy ears

- Predators, a rabbit can literally die from fright, like when seeing a predator
(hog, coyote, fox, cat, weasel, ect.) , so extra procotion should be taken.
 

Lucas the Bun 💕🐇

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PLEASE don’t get 2 baby’s, they’ll be “best friends” at first & then hormones kick in & they‘ll either mate or can kill each other. (sorry if this came off as rude not meant to be)

They need to be spayed/neutered before bonding.

At least 32 square feet for one rabbit, but the bigger the better.

Essentials:
 
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Cosmic11

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PLEASE don’t get 2 baby’s, they’ll be “best friends” at first & then hormones kick in & they‘ll either mate or can kill each other. (sorry if this came off as rude not meant to be)

They need to be spayed/neutered before bonding.

At least 32 square feet for one rabbit, but the bigger the better.

Essentials:
Hi,

Just thought I’d add this for thought.
You can definitely keep your rabbits outside, but there are more responsibilities when keeping them outside as opposed to inside (my opinion, not meant to offend anyone).

- Harder to watch out for GI stasis and illnesses, as you may have to deal with mosquitos, rain, hot weather, ect. when going to check on them.

- If these are going to be pet rabbits I would suggest keeping them inside ( easier for you to interact & build a bond *not saying it can’t be done though, just takes more effort then walking across the hall to visit*

- Its easier for rabbits to get flystrike outside than inside

- Hot weather is something to consider especially with Angora, Lionhead, and American rabbits also lops as it’s harder to regulate heat with those adorable floppy ears

- Predators, a rabbit can literally die from fright, like when seeing a predator
(hog, coyote, fox, cat, weasel, ect.) , so extra procotion should be taken.
Yeah. Maybe outside isn't the greatest idea, but IDK if my mom will allow one into the house. Considering I have already made her mad with my 3 fish tanks... And then there is RHDV for the rabbits...

How many could I keep inside? Can you recommend an enclosure? I don't really think keeping them inside is an option tho...
 

Lucas the Bun 💕🐇

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Cosmic11

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Is there anything I can do to prevent against RHDV?
 

Lucas the Bun 💕🐇

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Cosmic11

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Do you have a list of the essential I would need?
 

Hermelin

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The essential you will need, will depend on how you will house the bunny.


But for me the essential is:
  1. Hay
  2. Cage/home base it will change in the future and the bunnies will have their own room.
  3. Litter box
  4. Litter
  5. Pellets
  6. Brush
  7. Nail trimmer
  8. Bedding (I use blankets and vetbed)
  9. While the outdoor cage I use straw as bedding
  10. Chewing toys but it can also just be fresh branches/diy toys
  11. Hide house while outdoor I make they have one bedroom and a shelf.
  12. Travel cage/carrier
  13. Cord protectors
  14. Bowls for food & water
270607DB-CBB2-498C-8BE6-633BF9800600.jpeg

Emergency:
  1. Critical care
  2. Syringe
  3. Baby gas drops
  4. Tick remover
  5. Saline solution to clean wounds and eyes

Myself always vaccinate my bunnies to make sure they are protected. Some states have fixed the vaccine, so they can get a protection. But bare in mind vaccination will only provide a protection and it’s not a 100% protection, at least it’s better than nothing and will give the bunny a figthing chance to survive.
I might have missed something 😂

The only one I let the indoor cage be closed is for my netherland dwarf. Because he will still have place to binky and play around but it’s only used for night time or when a lot of people or dogs come over. Otherwise it stand open all the time. While if it any of my other bunnies in the room, the cage will always be open except during litter box training. Then I use the cage as a restricted area to teach them to go to the litter box but will give them roaming time outside the cage.

I also use the cage if any of my bunnies need to heal 😊

While outdoor I use a 3 sq m hutch with a 15 sq m run for my bunnies. I also have a smaller cage in the outdoor area but it’s used as an extra place to jump into. The outdoor cage is something that work for me but it’s not predatore safe, except the hutch is 1.1m above the ground. So if it was a permament living I would change and build it better.
 

Cosmic11

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The essential you will need, will depend on how you will house the bunny.


But for me the essential is:
  1. Hay
  2. Cage/home base it will change in the future and the bunnies will have their own room.
  3. Litter box
  4. Litter
  5. Pellets
  6. Brush
  7. Nail trimmer
  8. Bedding (I use blankets and vetbed)
  9. While the outdoor cage I use straw as bedding
  10. Chewing toys but it can also just be fresh branches/diy toys
  11. Hide house while outdoor I make they have one bedroom and a shelf.
  12. Travel cage/carrier
  13. Cord protectors
  14. Bowls for food & water
View attachment 50950

Emergency:
  1. Critical care
  2. Syringe
  3. Baby gas drops
  4. Tick remover
  5. Saline solution to clean wounds and eyes

Myself always vaccinate my bunnies to make sure they are protected. Some states have fixed the vaccine, so they can get a protection. But bare in mind vaccination will only provide a protection and it’s not a 100% protection, at least it’s better than nothing and will give the bunny a figthing chance to survive.
I might have missed something 😂

The only one I let the indoor cage be closed is for my netherland dwarf. Because he will still have place to binky and play around but it’s only used for night time or when a lot of people or dogs come over. Otherwise it stand open all the time. While if it any of my other bunnies in the room, the cage will always be open except during litter box training. Then I use the cage as a restricted area to teach them to go to the litter box but will give them roaming time outside the cage.

I also use the cage if any of my bunnies need to heal 😊

While outdoor I use a 3 sq m hutch with a 15 sq m run for my bunnies. I also have a smaller cage in the outdoor area but it’s used as an extra place to jump into. The outdoor cage is something that work for me but it’s not predatore safe, except the hutch is 1.1m above the ground. So if it was a permament living I would change and build it better.
Ok. Thanks for all the info!
 

Apollo’s Slave

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Outdoor housing is a lot more common here in the U.K. I think most people have covered it all, but one thing I would say, is that if you’re going to keep them outside, don’t use a commercially available hutch, they’re way too small. Something like these pictures would be better.
 

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Niomi

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I think one of the biggest threats to outdoor rabbits is the snow. Rabbits can play in the snow as long as they have plenty of straw or hay to dry off in. When the snow begins to melt and it is wet and cold, that is when it gets dangerous to let your rabbits play in snow. Wet, cold rabbits can catch pneumonia easily. Some people like to place hutches against a building to block the cold winds, but when the snow and is wet from melting, sometimes that snow can tumble off of the roof and land in the hutch and pose a health risk. Rabbits can make it through the coldest of winters if they are protected from the elements, but I think spring poses the biggest risks for rabbits.
 

Hermelin

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F6764528-2D72-4B4A-B5F7-45CBBDA78943.jpeg
My own ugly outdoor cage for Toste, he’s under the small hutch. I can have this set up because my neighboor let their large dogs run loose in their yard with no fence. So if a fox turn up, they will chase them away because my neighboor also own bunnies. So the dogs don’t react to the bunnies but react to foxes.

Also my dad is always home and distance courses make me and my little brother always home. During night Toste will be tucked in the outdoor hutch. The hutch stand on wooded flooring while if I truly had a bunny that wanted to dig out they would be able to do it. Not a safe run but I know Toste only dig for fun and I fill up the holes. My outdoor set up is something I will just throw away when I move. At least the large hutch will be thrown away, it will just have one more year of use.

Myself can stand perfectly straight under the large hutch, I think my brother also can do it 6,1 ft from roof to ground and my shoe box hutch can hold 100 kg at least. This is based with both me and my little brother going into the hutch and I also had my dad jumping in the hutch. Had to make sure it would be able to handle a giant bunny jumping in the cage 🤣

It look ugly but I was the one that built the hutch in one day. So it’s not the best structure and I didn’t want to put down time on a hutch that will be teardown later. I also didn’t want to spend any extra money, so a few of the things of the hutch is just scratch pieces I had home and put it together.

Toste love sleeping smack in the middle of the kids table, like a dead log. While the blue net is just a way to keep the brids away. If they flew into the net, they will get tangled up. But the birds can see the net from a distance. It also keep the cats from getting in and make sure Toste won’t climb out the run or jumping out.

I could of put a second flooring in the hutch 😂
 

Blue eyes

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I think one of the biggest threats to outdoor rabbits is the snow. Rabbits can play in the snow as long as they have plenty of straw or hay to dry off in. When the snow begins to melt and it is wet and cold, that is when it gets dangerous to let your rabbits play in snow. Wet, cold rabbits can catch pneumonia easily. Some people like to place hutches against a building to block the cold winds, but when the snow and is wet from melting, sometimes that snow can tumble off of the roof and land in the hutch and pose a health risk. Rabbits can make it through the coldest of winters if they are protected from the elements, but I think spring poses the biggest risks for rabbits.
There won't be any snow in the Bay Area of California. ;) Their winter temps are in the 50s-60s (10-20 C).
 

Blue eyes

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You should know that it isn't advised to get multiple rabbits -- especially not a first-time bunny owner. Rabbits can fight viciously (even to death). They do best in bonded pairs but they can't be bonded until they have both been fixed. It doesn't matter if both are female or both male, they still need to be fixed or their hormones will cause them to fight.

Since you are new to rabbits, you'll have much to learn before bringing one home. Rabbits are so adorable and they look so cuddly, that many people have the wrong idea about what kind of pet they will be. Baby rabbits in pet stores are so easy to handle and seem so docile. This isn't at all what an adult rabbit is like.

I'd encourage you to click on the following link (my website). It discusses some of the common myths about rabbits and I think it is important for a new potential owner to be aware of this. Here it is:

The best (and cheapest) way to get a rabbit (or an already bonded pair) is from a rescue. The prices of their rabbits is considered cheap because they are already spayed. So even a $150 rescue rabbit (it could be much less) will cost less than getting a $15 rabbit that has to be spayed because spays can cost over $250.

Since rescue rabbits are already fixed, they often have bonded pairs available. Then you could have 2 rabbits without having to go through a bonding process.
 

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