New bunny, many questions!

Discussion in 'General Rabbit Discussion' started by Bruna Franco, Mar 19, 2019.

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  1. Mar 19, 2019 #1

    Bruna Franco

    Bruna Franco

    Bruna Franco

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    Hey guys, hopefully I’m not posting this on the wrong spot.

    So, 3 months ago I got myself a bunny (he was around 4 mo old then, he’s 7 months now). Tambor (that’s his name) has already been neutered, he’s 1,4kg (around 3 pounds, if I’m not wrong), male. I’ve been reading this forum a lot and has been really helpful! But still there’re some questions I can’t really figure out.

    First of all, I’ve been told that he must not walk on slippery floor because, according to the vet, he’ll have spine issues in the future (maybe 4 years from now). The doctor said he’ll sure have, without a doubt, osteophytes (parrot’s beak) or any other spine problem when he is older if he continues to walk on anything that is not a carpet. Have anyone ever heard anything about it? I’ve searched a lot about this, but can’t find any reference to this. Everyone who’s talking about slippery floor and rabbits always says the big problem is that they usually don’t like that type of floor and that they can get hurt if they slips.

    My second problem is: he doesn’t eat hay. I’ve tried 4 types already and nothing seems to work. I’ve already tried putting some into toys, mixed with veggies, mixed with his pellets, inside his litter box... I have even tried to not feed him with anything else but hay for half a day, for example, and, apparently, he prefers to be starving (which I know he can’t be) and wait for his pellets, that he loves. Do you have other suggestion? I really know how important it is for him to eat hay, but I don’t know what else to try.

    And last, but not least, I really would like to know if anyone can tell me what breed he is! I think he is mixed breed, but I’m not sure.

    Hope you guys could understand my English, I’m brazilian and there’re not a lot of forums in Portuguese about rabbits.

    Thank you!!

    8F9C715D-B404-4F62-BB50-11C2732E8E8B.jpg 3C299A5A-7DF4-4C0F-894E-8E23D0974D1D.jpg Snapseed.jpg IMG_0717.jpg IMG_0698.jpg IMG_0595.jpg IMG_0458.jpg
     
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  2. Mar 19, 2019 #2

    jess24rose

    jess24rose

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    He is so cute. He's a lop breed I don't know what else also my bun wan't eating hay at first but now she's either eating hay or sleeping. About the slippery floor I've heard it not good for them but I thought it was because of sore hocks not spinal problems.
     
  3. Mar 19, 2019 #3

    Kale Passfield

    Kale Passfield

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    Holland lop probably. Maybe mini rex holand lop cross. Take away pellets from his diet and put all 4 types of hay in. Pellets for your bunny max you want to give 1/8-1/4 cup a day. It sounds like you've been giving more and pellets are tastier so he wont eat hay if theres pellets. We had to take pellets completely out for our first bunny to force hay consumption. After a couple days of him eating hay you can give the 1/8-1/4 cup pellets. Also for the carpet thing I'm not sure but I do know rabbits dont have much padding on their feet so rugs or carpet is better for that
     
  4. Mar 19, 2019 #4

    Kale Passfield

    Kale Passfield

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    Also check his teeth
     
  5. Mar 19, 2019 #5

    Deludedbyreality

    Deludedbyreality

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    Throw rugs will work fine as long as they have rubber backing and the fibers are dense, (like microfiber) the shorter the better to prevent possible digging and pulling and munching, and will stay in one place on your floor; as well as, memory foam bath mats for an enclosure. As long as they have spaces they can go to and get grip to be able to run and jump and play. This is the main thing, constantly trying to play where there is no grip available will cause joint problems (cartilage and tendon and ligament wear from over extension) as well as, slippage in spinal discs and extra wear and tear on the vertebrae (micro breaks in the bone). Think of if you had to spend your entire life on rollerskates as a similar condition. I also put down an old comforter for mine that is beyond saving in case they feel like digging as a protective measure. You can also make washable bedding pads from stacked and sewn together fleece blankets.

    I agree with Kale but if all else fails homemade hay treats can help transition as well just give them sparingly alternate between 1-2 a day for first week then 1 a day next week, 1 every other day the week after and so on weaning off as hes eating more of his hay until it's an occasional 2 when hes been very good. Watch these though as they can cause weight gain if you give too much because of the oats and pay close attention to make sure hes getting the idea with the hay being yummy and not just holding out waiting for the treat like he seems to be doing with the pellets. I've had similar experiences and then come round the corner unexpectedly and their face is in the hay feeder with a look of disdain on their faces as if to say, "I'm only eating it since you've decided you're going to starve me to death." You can also try to hand feed and rub it across his lips while holding him on your lap.

    Screenshot_20190306-015607_Pinterest.jpg You can also alter the ingredients to be more dense in terms of hay and cut it up (scissors work best) as well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
  6. Mar 19, 2019 #6

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    What type and how much pellets does he normally get each day? Often rabbits that get too many pellets will refuse hay. The pellets are just so tasty!

    Depriving him of pellets for a short time until you give in (as you described that you did) just teaches him that he can be more stubborn than you. Instead, I'd suggest gradually cutting back his pellet amount and cut out all treats (greens are fine). Continue to provide hay variety, but it should be refreshed every day (whether or not he eats any). Hay that sits in a cage for a while somehow becomes less appealing -- even for good hay eaters.
     
  7. Mar 20, 2019 #7

    SableSteel

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    What a cutie! Purebred rabbits seen in other parts of the world are relatively less common in south america (there isn't much of a rabbit breeding hobby - however there still are some breeds found for the meat and pet trade such as new zealand and dutch, but being bred for pets instead of for show their traits aren't as likely to be as exaggerated and apparent and youd see on show rabbits) and so most the rabbits there aren't too closely identifiable. I know a rabbit breeder who lived in brazil for a time while in the peace corp, and she worked with the local meat rabbits there (which were breeding true, such as a landrace), which she brought back to the US under the name "brazilian" rabbits. Although brazilian rabbits don't have lopped ears, he does have the right color for it (a dilute color - blue tort) and head shape (from the few times Ive seen them in person, maybe only a half dozen times). Because he shares traits from those two breeds I'd probably call him a lop x brazilian cross. (http://rabbitgeek.com/breed/brazilian.html)

    I would advise not raising them on slippery surfaces when they are too young. Very young kits can be more prone to splay leg when they can't get a grip on things and their legs develop while in a spread out position. Still, from the pictures he looks to be old enough that he should be fine imo as long as he doesnt live on a slippery surface 100% of the time.

    I don't know how to help you on the hay part. My rabbits rarely get hay and when they do Ive never had any turn it down, they prefer it over my pellets (but my pellets are made to be a complete diet)
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019

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