Kit with no eyes?

Discussion in 'The Rabbitry and Show Room' started by Emma Walker, Jan 13, 2020.

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  1. Jan 13, 2020 #1

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

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    Princess ended up kindling 2 stillborn kits.

    However a few days later she gave birth to a dead furred kit. It was huge, no ears and no eyes. It had eye sockets, but the fur had grown inside them, and they were hollow. What happened? I’ve never seen anything like it in my life
     
  2. Jan 13, 2020 #2

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    First-time mom? I have never heard of them being born with fur. I guess it was just an oops. If this was an intentional breed try again and if it happens a second time then I wouldn't breed her anymore. If this was not intentional then I would not worry about her and get her spayed ASAP, as after 3-4 years old rabbits have an 80% chance of getting uterine cancer.
     
  3. Jan 13, 2020 #3

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

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    Kind of accidental, but also not :confused:

    I do want to breed her with my angora buck (she’s an angora also) however the litter wasn’t exactly planned for :oops: I didn’t know the date she was bred so separated her as soon as I had a feeling she was pregnant. Because of this I didn’t know her due date. I’m guessing she went overdue though if the kit had fur.

    I’m now not too sure what to do, if I should try again with her or not
     
  4. Jan 13, 2020 #4

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    If you are just breeding for pets then I would encourage you not to because there are so many rabbits now that need homes that were unplanned. But if you are breeding for show or to better the breed then, most breeders go on the 3 strikes your out rule, meaning if there are 3 failed breedings then do not breed that doe any more. Not necessarily, because rabbits don't normally get fur until around day 10 after birth. It could just be a genetic mishap.
     
  5. Jan 13, 2020 #5

    Jasminebunny

    Jasminebunny

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    The babies probably didn't develop properly , and that caused them to be dead
     
  6. Jan 13, 2020 #6

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

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    No, I’m not breeding for pets at all. I’ve moved to South Africa (originally from the uk) and live on just over an acre of land, I want to breed my angoras for wool, for show, and to make the breed over here stronger.

    I also have Flemish giants which I am going to show also, and to help the breed over here. There has been a ban on rabbits here since the 80’s that stops rabbits being brought into the country, so some of the limited breeds they have here are struggling due to mixed/bad breeding to the point of nearly going extinct. The good thing with the ban though, is there isn’t the rabbit diseases here so they don’t need vaccinations.

    I also rescue pet rabbits that get dumped around the area I live, these I pay myself for their vet treatments and sterilisations, so I do know about the problem with over breeding, especially mixed pets that just make more pets. I’m also faced with the problem that live snake food isn’t illegal here, and many accidental litters or dumped rabbits end up being fed to other pets. I have built a designated area on my plot for rescues, and another for the rabbits I want to breed, but I am new to breeding so am sure I’m going to come across quite a few problems along the way.
     
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  7. Jan 13, 2020 #7

    Jasminebunny

    Jasminebunny

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    I breed too , i have 5 rabbits , my bun has had one litter so far , i don't breed in the winter , i only breed from march( end of march to beginning of august) to august .
    Good luck with your doe! ( and her babies ! :p:D)
     
  8. Jan 13, 2020 #8

    JBun

    JBun

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    It sounds like birth defects. It could be genetic, and if so then breeding that pair isn't a good idea. But there are also health issues that can cause birth defects. In particular, vitamin/nutrient deficiencies and toxins. So if you do breed that pair again and the next litter also has birth defects, I would first look at a possible imbalance of nutrients(such as an improper mixture of vitamin levels in pelleted feed) in what they are being fed, then possible toxins that could be in their environment or mixed into their feed when it's pelleted. If changes there don't fix the issue, then next likely is a bad pairing of genetics.
     
  9. Jan 15, 2020 #9

    Emma Walker

    Emma Walker

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    Jasmine, good luck with your breeding! I hope it all works out for you :)

    Jbun, thank you for this info, I’m definitely going to take it on board and check if there’s a better diet option for all my buns. They all get treated like royalty here, and I add protexin into their water once a week also. However will definitely look into a better pellet option if needed. Thanks again x
     
  10. Jan 18, 2020 at 4:08 AM #10

    majorv

    majorv

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    If it were me I’d breed the same pair again, taking note of the breeding date, and see what you get. It’s not unusual for first time Mom’s to have failed litters. If she has another stillborn litter then it may not be a good pairing. We did have a doe give birth to a kit once that already had a fine coat of fur...it was overdue but born alive. It ended up being her last litter unfortunately.
    Breed stock usually needs a little higher protein and most breeders feed an alfalfa based pellet.
     

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