Introducing a baby bunny to an older bunny.

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

Grumbleduck

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
16
Reaction score
5
Location
NULL
Hey guys,

You may have seen my 9 month old Hotot Lionhead, Pixie. He's had a lot of trouble in his earlier months but thank goodness he's made it through and is a very happy little bunny. In the past few weeks I have considered adopting a companion for him, it would be a female and my partner and I are very comfortable in breeding if it occurs, though our male Pixie appears very disinterested in most things.

He receives many hours of free roam a day but prefers spending those hours horizontal than stretching his legs, and I just get the impression he could benefit from a friend. However, I have done some research and I am getting dragged in all sorts of directions with so much different information, so I'd rather speak to actual rabbit owners for advice!

The bunny (female) we're looking to introduce is only 2 months old. Would that be far too young to introduce with our 9 month male? I have read it's advised to house rabbits of a similar age, but this little girl really is in need of a good home. We have a second cage prepared and have plenty of neutral places to introduce them.

If a 2 month old bunny isn't suitable, should we really be aiming for a similar age? What should we expect upon a neutral encounter?
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
8,203
Reaction score
5,190
Location
Arizona, USA
Not a good idea. A baby is not the best choice to bond with an adult. Simple reason is that regardless of whether they get along initially (often they will if one is so young), once the hormones of the new gal kick in, all heck can break loose. Baby bonds simply don't count as true bonds and often cause more headache.

The main problem will be that one never knows precisely when those hormones will suddenly affect her (or him). If the two bunnies are together because "they get along so well," and you don't happen to be present when those hormones cause an issue, the two could very well begin fighting - even seriously. If that occurs, then chances of a future bond are greatly reduced or eliminated.

The best (and safest) way to find a bondmate for your current male is to neuter him and then (after 2 months) have him 'bunny date' some fixed females. This way he gets to choose who he will bond with. Rabbit bonds can be quite tricky. Intact males won't just accept any rabbit. It may not be possible to bond him while he is intact.

Here's a site that explain a little more about a couple bonding methods.
http://rabbitsindoors.weebly.com/bonding-bunnies.html
 

Grumbleduck

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
16
Reaction score
5
Location
NULL
Thank you Blue eyes for your response!
I'd certainly not want to risk either bunny being hurt so I will not go ahead with this option. I am really concerned about sending my male bunny in for 'The Snip'. He's been through so many vet visits since he was very tiny and I know it sounds irresponsible of me, but I don't think my heart could take seeing him go through more stress. :(
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
8,203
Reaction score
5,190
Location
Arizona, USA
Awww. Poor little guy.
One thing to consider, however, is that he will ultimately be a happier bunny once fixed. Then he could benefit from the companion of a future (fixed) bondmate. Fixed buns tend to be more consistent with potty training too and their urine odor is reduced.
 

Grumbleduck

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
16
Reaction score
5
Location
NULL
It's a very straight forward procedure isn't it? There aren't many risks? If there are any, is it something that can be tackled easy? The bunny is housed beside my desk in my office which I spend way too much time in, so I've always got an eye on him around the clock :)
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
8,203
Reaction score
5,190
Location
Arizona, USA
It is straight forward. You can check the House Rabbit Society (rabbit.org) and search in the search bar for "spay/neuter." The article there explains the benefits, but also (and importantly) explains how to choose the right vet and and what to expect before and after. It should put your mind at ease.
 

Chester1_andblueberry

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2015
Messages
230
Reaction score
26
Location
NULL
I can't really decide because my bunny*Chester&Rex* was 6 months and I got a 1 1/2 old baby holland lop and I just put him in the same room because all the other bonding processes Chester would be very scared such as in the bathtub and on my bed so I just decided to put him *Holland lop,Mr.Blueberry * in Chesters room and They got along SO well although he never groomed Chester and chester would duck his head as if to ask to be groomed but..Blueberry never did but Chester didnt mind.Now 2 months later you never see them separately. :)
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
8,203
Reaction score
5,190
Location
Arizona, USA
^^ your lop is now only 3 1/2 months of age, so those hormones may not yet be active. It would be more rare for them to stay fine with no issues, but if they are still doing ok when the young one reaches 7 to 8 months, then they'll probably be that rare exception and be ok.
 

Toniwisbey

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
18
Reaction score
11
Location
Barmouth, gwynedd
I can't really decide because my bunny*Chester&Rex* was 6 months and I got a 1 1/2 old baby holland lop and I just put him in the same room because all the other bonding processes Chester would be very scared such as in the bathtub and on my bed so I just decided to put him *Holland lop,Mr.Blueberry * in Chesters room and They got along SO well although he never groomed Chester and chester would duck his head as if to ask to be groomed but..Blueberry never did but Chester didnt mind.Now 2 months later you never see them separately. :)
Hi I wondered if you were still on this group and I was after an update on Chester and blueberry, I’m curious did the remain friends? I hope they did xxxx
 

Jadette

Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
7
Location
Southern California
I don't like bonding my unfixed bucks with does - even when the doe is fixed. It's just constant chasing, humping and spraying on the doe that I think is not fair to the doe.

Just realized this is a really old thread.
 

Toniwisbey

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
18
Reaction score
11
Location
Barmouth, gwynedd
I don't like bonding my unfixed bucks with does - even when the doe is fixed. It's just constant chasing, humping and spraying on the doe that I think is not fair to the doe.

Just realized this is a really old thread.
It’s old but I commented the last there day lol, do you mind if I ask a question? 🤔 how about bonding a fixed Buck to a doe that’s waiting to be done ? Any thoughts xx
 

Fuz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
154
Reaction score
169
Location
South Africa
I wouldn't recommend bonding them until after she's been spayed and healed for a few weeks. Depending on their personalities, bonding can sometimes be a little stressful, and then taking her in for surgery is stressful as well.

Get her spayed, and healed completely. Then introduce them after. They're likely to be more friendly then as well. That's my opinion, best of luck!
 

Toniwisbey

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2020
Messages
18
Reaction score
11
Location
Barmouth, gwynedd
I wouldn't recommend bonding them until after she's been spayed and healed for a few weeks. Depending on their personalities, bonding can sometimes be a little stressful, and then taking her in for surgery is stressful as well.

Get her spayed, and healed completely. Then introduce them after. They're likely to be more friendly then as well. That's my opinion, best of luck!
Thank you xx
 

Latest posts

Top