How to treat a rabbit bite?

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Littlebun

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My bunny nipped me a little too hard today. I was holding her in my lap and she heard a noise so I tried to restrain her from jumping off as I was enjoying the cuddles but then she bit my arm and ran off. I was wearing full sleeves so I only have a small bruise on my arm, there is no blood or punctured skin just a light bruise. Do I need to get a tetanus shot over this particular situation? I’m a little paranoid when it comes to these things but I don’t remember the last time I got a tetanus shot it has been quite a few years probably 25.
 

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If it didn't break the skin, there should be no risk of infection. I would treat it like any bruise. But even if it did break the skin, it's not like cat bites that can be potentially very harmful because of the bacteria transferred. Though of course there can always be some potential risk with any wound developing infection or other problems healing.

A bite from a rabbit, I would wash with soap and water, then just monitor for infection as it heals (contacting a doctor if infection does develop past being able to deal with myself). I might use Neosporin and a bandaid (changed daily or more often as needed) to aid in healing and stopping a potential infection. Unless it was a deep bite through the layer of skin, then a doctor visit, stitches and antibiotics may be needed.

This is just what I do. If you're unsure and have concerns about potential medical issues, it's best to consult with a qualified medical professional.
 
If it didn't break the skin, there should be no risk of infection. I would treat it like any bruise. But even if it did break the skin, it's not like cat bites that can be potentially very harmful because of the bacteria transferred. Though of course there can always be some potential risk with any wound developing infection or other problems healing.

A bite from a rabbit, I would wash with soap and water, then just monitor for infection as it heals (contacting a doctor if infection does develop past being able to deal with myself). I might use Neosporin and a bandaid (changed daily or more often as needed) to aid in healing and stopping a potential infection. Unless it was a deep bite through the layer of skin, then a doctor visit, stitches and antibiotics may be needed.

This is just what I do. If you're unsure and have concerns about potential medical issues, it's best to consult with a qualified medical professional.
Also just want to know, rabbits cannot transmit rabies right? As far as I’ve read they cannot survive an attack by a rabid animal. But if they were to survive an attack, can they transmit it to a human via a bite?
 
Any animal that's contracted rabies, can pass it through a bite. But pet rabbits are unlikely carriers due to the fact they aren't usually exposed to other animals outdoors, that could be carriers of the disease. Unlike cats and dogs, that often are walking unprotected outdoors and can easily be exposed.

But it doesn't mean there aren't instances where it couldn't happen to pet rabbits. It's just extremely rare. Say a pet rabbit is allowed to free roam the garden outside, not protected in an enclosed run. If it were attacked by something like a fox, there's the possibility the rabbit could contract rabies if the fox has the disease. So the possibility does exist, even though it's uncommon with pet rabbits.
 
Any animal that's contracted rabies, can pass it through a bite. But pet rabbits are unlikely carriers due to the fact they aren't usually exposed to other animals outdoors, that could be carriers of the disease. Unlike cats and dogs, that often are walking unprotected outdoors and can easily be exposed.

But it doesn't mean there aren't instances where it couldn't happen to pet rabbits. It's just extremely rare. Say a pet rabbit is allowed to free roam the garden outside, not protected in an enclosed run. If it were attacked by something like a fox, there's the possibility the rabbit could contract rabies if the fox has the disease. So the possibility does exist, even though it's uncommon with pet rabbits.
Right, so I don’t need to be worried about rabies do I? I know my skin didn’t break, but I’m feeling a little overwhelmed at today’s events and just looking for reassurance. I highly doubt my bunny has been exposed to rabies, I’ve had her for 6 months and she’s never set foot outside the house and not been exposed to any other animal. If she had rabies (God forbid) she would definitely be showing signs and symptoms right?
 
It's not something I would be at all worried about in similar circumstances. But if you're concerned about it, it would be best to talk to your doctor.
 
Tetanus--rabies not necessary unless you gotten a bite from an animal that took off after biting--why animal control here will quarantine a dog if it bites someone. Unlikely to the extreme to worry about a house rabbit as they are not exposed to "wild" carriers. In our times it seems that Bats are a greater source than any other animal--you can get Tetanus from a scratch without having interaction with animals so it's way more prevalent in our environ. Talk with a medical professional for clarification and with vet or health district people.
 
@Littlebun, a little advise, if your rabbit wants to get away from your hug, don't force him/her to stay unless if by jumping out he/she's going to hurt/endangering him/her safety. E.g: jump from while you're standing or jump from high place. Otherwise, let the rabbit comes to you to build trust with you.
 
Hi, is your rabbit vaccinated?

The things rabbits get vaccinated for (Myxo, RHD) don't affect humans. There imho is no rabies vaccine for rabbits, and infected rabbits don't survive long, 3-4 days.

I consider getting nipped, to the point of bruising, rather normal. Some of my rabbits are not holding back when they get angry, but things like brushing need to be done. Breaking skin can happen, so what. As herbivores they don't have as bad a set of bacteria as cats (evil) or dogs. Have your tetanus up to date, treat the wound like one from a nail or piece of wood, and you're good for a start. Like with every wound, if inflamation or pus occures see a doctor.
 
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@Littlebun, a little advise, if your rabbit wants to get away from your hug, don't force him/her to stay unless if by jumping out he/she's going to hurt/endangering him/her safety. E.g: jump from while you're standing or jump from high place. Otherwise, let the rabbit comes to you to build trust with you.
Yep, I was gonna suggest this too. If your Bun wants to jump off your lap, just let them, don't force them to stay there, as this will make them distrust you.

I also wouldn't stress too much if the skin wasn't broken by the bite, but by all means, go to your doctor if you are worried
 
Hi guys, thanks for you replies. The bite bruise healed and I’m fine, I didn’t get a tetanus shot either as the skin didn’t break. I do have one question. Just now my bunny made this sound. She’s not in any obvious pain, and acting totally normal otherwise, but I went to pick up her poo using this scoop, which she has seen before and even plays with, but she started whimpering as I tried to pick her poo almost as if she was afraid or didn’t want me to pick it up? She is not spayed yet, so is this something hormonal? She is an only bunny and is pooping around the room marking her territory, but this sound is totally new to me and I am a bit worried about it though it is such a cute sound!!
 

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Bunnies do make several sounds. Nick growls when he gets put up in his hutch--guess he thinks he should be out all the time and tough potatos for the other 2. Our girl Lilly used to run around honking and even buzzed and she used to grunt when we put her veggies into her hutch while coming over and then nuzzling our hands for a head/chin rub. 50+ rescues and they all have had quirks and some similar behaviors--bunnies are both funny and sometimes strange.
 
yea their noises can mean so many things, your Bun might of been acting territorial, and made the sound, or she might have been saying hello, or she might have been growling at you for picking it up. A good thing to do is watch their body language, or the position of their body when they make the sound, that is generally a good way to figure out what they are saying with the noise. If you can learn their body language/stance, or positions, its a good cue for us humans
 
Thanks for your replies. Yes a couple of days later I figured out the reason - Territorial or when she’s annoyed. Haha they are funny little things! I learn something new everyday!
 
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