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how to make my bun gain weight

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Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod
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I have had oats cause mucky bum issues for some of my rabbits, so it just depends on the rabbit. Generally it is better to not give rabbits any foods that contain excess sugars/carbs if they aren't needed, as this has the potential to upset the microbial balance in the gut. However, some rabbits tolerate carbs in their diet better than others and if there are no signs of oats causing digestive upset and/or mushy poop, they can be helpful for rabbits that need foods to help them gain some weight. But like majorv mentioned, moderation is important, as is proper introduction into the rabbits current diet.
 

flemishwhite

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I read all the posts. I now have experience feeding three rabbits on oat hay. They just love it. They like to chew it and they like to eat the oar kernels.

When talking about feeding rabbits, keep in mind they have two stomachs. One stomach is like ours..its at the end of the esophagus and it joins onto the small intestine. The rabbit's second stomach is at the juncture of the small intestine and the large intestine...it's the Cecum. In humans, it's a vestigle organ know to us as the appendix. The Cecum is a very important stomach for rabbits. It's where the rabbit's vegetarian cellulose food gets transformed to glucose. The bacteria in the Cecum feed themselves with this glucose and the excess glucose these bacteria make goes to feed the bunny.

My experience feeding house pet rabbits is that they know instinctively how to eat. I've seen situations where I've feed my rabbit banana slices/apple slices to where she didn't want to eat any more, but then she would aggressively start eating greens (carrot tops, etc). The fruit was food for her first stomach and for hunger that could certainly satiate her. But this food was digested in her first stomach. She had an instinctive urge to eat greens to feed the symbiotic bacteria in her second stomach. These symbiotic bacteria, that transform cellulose to glucose are essential for a rabbits life. The rabbit had an instinctive urge to eat food that will feed these bacteria.

Our past rabbit Bunny, and our now two Flemmish girls, have all the food they want to eat. Fresh green veggies are in their food bowls, rabbit pellets, oat hay in their litter boxes for chomping, and pretty much fruit slices as they want...our only reluctance with feeding them fruit is that we don't want them to get too fat. No problem with diarrehia.
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Haven't fed to the Flemmish yet, but Bunny liked bing cherries, unsalted almond slices, guava's, unsalted peanuts.
 

flemishwhite

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I think the oat thing has pretty much been belabored. But just two quick last comments (from me). The oats I've been feeding my rabbits or the last 12 years are the same oat hay that people buy to feed their horses. It is abrasive and will help control rabbit tooth growth. Also, I planted some of the oat seeds and later harvested some large green stalks of oats with kernal blossums. Bunny, just really loved eating his stuff.
 

Siskellery

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I would try oats in small amounts to make sure they dont cause issues. I have a bun that is a little under weight and ive been feeding oats. She is doing great and she loves them!
 

Blue eyes

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I would try oats in small amounts to make sure they dont cause issues. I have a bun that is a little under weight and ive been feeding oats. She is doing great and she loves them!
This is a 4 1/2 year old thread. Please be sure to check the dates before reviving an old thread. :)
 

Kellyann

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I eat cooked organic oats that have some quinoa and flaxseed in them. When I first got Alfie I thought it would be ok to give him about 1/2 tsp in the morning with 1/2 a blueberry so we could share breakfast. He quickly became overweight and I had to stop! But for about 4 months(he was a baby) they never caused any problems other than the weight gain. I do give him an original , unsweetened Cherrio about twice a week. Alf is supposed to eat 2 tbsp of pellets a day but he gets three, if you check the nutritional values Oxbow pellets are higher in fiber and protein than critical care and have slightly more calories or almost the same.
Oxbow pellets
2.8 kcals per gram
Fiber 25%
Critical Care
2.6 kcals per gram.
Fiber 21%
Alf prefers to eat pellets over being force fed. Good luck.
 

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