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LassieBunBun

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I hope this is the right place for this thread....
So...as some of you know I posted a picture of Thumper's face asking if I should be concerned and I got a couple of responses that felt very helpful. He's eating, drinking and doing his normal behavior but his face looks worse than before and I was wondering if there is a safe way to help him clean it. I'll attach the picture I took today to show you and I'll attach the link to the thread I mentioned so you can see for yourselves how much worse it is.
Link: Should I be concerned?
Todays picture:
 

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Blue eyes

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Since this has been going on for over a week and it is worse than it was before, I would suggest bringing him to a rabbit savvy vet. Our health moderator (@JBun ) may have more to add. That does not look normal by any means and it has not improved for too many days. :(
 

Moonshadow

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He actually looks thinner to me in this photo compared to your last photos of him. I second Blue Eyes advice on taking him to the vet.
 

JBun

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When a rabbit has consistent drooling issues, the most common cause is dental, such as from something stuck in the mouth, molar spurs, or a tooth infection. Your vet will likely do a thorough dental exam.

Medirabbit: excessive secretion of saliva

(WARNING: LINK CONTAINS GRAPHIC MEDICAL RELATED PHOTOS)
 

JBun

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I would suggest to keep an eye on his eating, drinking, and pooping until your appointment. As dental problems progress, they can cause a rabbit to selectively eat, not eating as much as normal(which will cause weight loss), sometimes drinking more than normal and eating less to sooth their mouth pain, and could cause a rabbit to stop eating altogether. If this happens, then you'll need to call your vet immediately for an emergency appointment. Otherwise your rabbit could go into full GI stasis. If your rabbit does stop eating or isn't eating well, you can ask your vet about syringe feeding until you are able to get your rabbit seen and the problem corrected.
 

Catlyn

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I want to but I don't have a scale that's suitable, my parents have a human digital scale but I don't trust it to be safe enough for him
You don't have to be worried about that. The main thing is that bun just might not sit still on the scale, or that they're too lightweight to be recognized by the scale.
We have a kitchen scale, but it isn't really helpful with medium-large-giant buns just because their bodies won't fit on it and in a box on the scale it would always be off.
So one family member volunteers to get on the scale, mark their weight, then do it again with rabbit snugly in their arms and deduct the extra weight to see the difference. It depends on the rabbits' size and the scale sensitivity.
That's what we do when we want to check weights, our buns are ~3.6 & 4.9kg and our scale takes by 10gram accuracy, so it works for us. From the picture i read that Thumper is a big-enough bun for that to work.
 
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