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English Lop and English Spot Help needed please

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shadow10978

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dajeti2 wrote:
I can feel Otis's shoulders, spine and pin bones. I'm thinking the drive and all was a bit stressful on him. I added a pinch of oats to his pellets every day and am mixing alfalfa and timothy hay for him.

I don't want him too thin but I also don't want him over weight either.

Tina
LOL Tina thats exactly what I have been doing along with free feed,which I have gotten very lucky with my girls that are here, they only will eat till they are full and will nibble on and off.... I am also giving her TONS of hey lol...Of course the kids are trying to help too they snuck nadia a couple ginger snap cookies earlier.... Someone please tell me that they wont hurt her, I asked gypsy and she didnt think they would but that I should double up on her hey just to be sure.
 

Shadow and Tina,I think what you Two need to do here is keep a running journal on these Two Rabbits, Week to week month to month and compare notes, Shadow Your Baby is younger than Tina's, From what Roger Cota and afew others have said the Spine is a natural occurance in being able tofeel it prominately. keep a measure on feet, ears, spine andbody (tape it out every moth to see if its expanding). Shadow Like we used todo to weigh the Horses. Then put teh Notes from bothtogether and build your EnglishLop information Site.
 

pamnock

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gypsy wrote:
From what Roger Cotaand a few others have said theSpine is a natural occurance in being able to feel it prominately.


Do remember that this is "not" a desired trait in the English Lops. Poor specimens are common on the show table--but according to the standard, should be "severely" faulted for their poor flesh coverage. Ideally, the body should bevery smooth, withNO rough spine or hips. (extra feed will not fix this genetic defect in conformation)

With more points on the body than on ears, a good, smooth and well balancedbody type is very important on the EL and should win over the rabbit with the longer ears.


I have seen very good ones with impressive bodies -- theyDO exist!:)



Pam

 

Im Hoping Nadia's over all conditioning will bulk up, While realizing that over feeding wont help is there any suggestions to see ifwe cant get her flesh conditionto improve, or a waste of time.Would more excersie helpwhile not totally correcting the problem, maybe improve on it a bit more ?

:faint:OH Good Grief, I am in troubel I didnt think English Lops came in Brokens !!!!!!!!
 

pamnock

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gypsy wrote:
Im Hoping Nadia's overall conditioning will bulk up, While realizing that over feeding wont help is there any suggestions to see ifwe cant get her flesh conditionto improve, or a waste of time. Would more excersie helpwhile not totally correcting the problem, maybe improve on it a bit more ?

:faint:OH Good Grief, I am in troubel I didnt think English Lops came in Brokens !!!!!!!!

Yep-- English Lops come in a very wide range of colors including broken -- however pointed white is not an accepted variety.

Feeding oats is a time honored method for adding flesh without adding fat.

Pam


 

3Bears

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Tina...

I believe this is what you were referring to.... Riokko wrote

"Just a few fun facts for you. When an English Lop is born their back feet are generally the same length as their head and ears. The tail is roughly half of the length of one ear. As they grow of course their ears grow like weeds, but the ratio stays almost the same between the ears and tail. That's why when showing English Lops so much care must be taken with their tails because not only are they very fragile but they are so extremely long. By the time they are an adult generally their back feet are just a bit longer than the head and the tail and back feet are generally close in length with the tail sometimes being a little longer, and generally the tail is still about half the length of one ear. I remember an English Lop I saw at a show one time though that had a 12" tail!! It was so funny looking to see that tail that long.. of course the rabbit did have 30" ears to balance with though!"

Sandra



 

shadow10978

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Feeding oats is a time honored method for adding flesh without adding fat.
Well at least I am doing something right lol...She gets oats in the am with her breakfast and at night before i go to bed....Although lately it has been to counter act the gingersnaps that the baby fed her yesterday, which is a NO NO even though she likes them they dont like her....
 

pamnock wrote:
gypsy wrote:
Im Hoping Nadia's overall conditioning will bulk up, While realizing that over feeding wont help is there any suggestions to see ifwe cant get her flesh conditionto improve, or a waste of time.Would more excersie helpwhile not totally correcting the problem, maybe improve on it a bit more ?

:faint:OH Good Grief, I am in troubel I didnt think English Lops came in Brokens !!!!!!!!
Yep-- English Lops come in a very wide range of colors including broken -- however pointed white is not an accepted variety.

Feeding oats is a time honored method for adding flesh without adding fat.

Pam

I am so In deeepTrouble, Hubby finds out and I may get Skinned and Tanned, I have this affliction to Brokens! just about every Breed in my barn with exception of Flemish and Palominos are Brokens , I just love the pattern.
Pam Roger was Telling me Someone was working the Standards to include Broken Flemish, Have You heard anything about this? IF SO you just Know Ihave so got to have one !
 

pamnock

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gypsy wrote:

Pam Roger was Telling meSomeone was working the Standards toinclude Broken Flemish Have You heard anythingabout this? IF SO you just Know I have so got to have one !

There are numerous varieties always being worked on. The onlybroken varieties being presented this year at convention are: English Angora (1st showing), Havana (2nd showing), and Netherland Dwarf (2nd showing).

I don't know who (or if) someone currently holds a COD for broken Flemish, however, you can find out by emailing ARBA at ARBAPOST@aol.comand letting us know :)



Pam
 

Bassetluv

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Hey, I don't have any advice, but I do have an Elop...so had to post here! Raph is most definitely not show quality, given problems he has with his joints, and he also has that 'bony' quality. When I pick him up or pat him (he's now almost 8 months old) his backbone is prominent, as are his hip bones. Yet he's well-fed and has a nice rounded belly. (The boy has an enormous appetite! I feed him high-fiber pellets, rolled oats, carrot, sometimes apple (minus the core), apple tree branches and leaves, some lettuce,a fewcraisins,free-range grass when he's outside, and as much hay as he wants. And he still wants more!) I don't know if he will fill out any more on top as he matures, will let you know if he does.

Here's a pic I took of him not long after he arrived, displaying those big feet and comical long tail:



~Di (and Raphie)
 

doodle

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This is so interesting. :) I adore English Lops (in pictures) but have never seen one in person.I never realized they have such long tails to go with their long ears.:D
 

Just for information purposes I recieved an Emailfrom Lis a D7 who's Sonraises E L 's and whatshe suggested was to give them a tiny bit of Horse sweet feed, foroverall flesh condition, she also mentioned using MODERATION, not only does it improve the flesh condition it will gain them weight .
 

pamnock

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Since *sweet* feeds have a sugar content as high as 40%, it's generally best to avoid using them for rabbits.You can get the same results with oats, and not have the digestive problems that excess sugar can cause.

Pam
 

Pam I got a response back from ARBA :

too bad I never gave a thought to Everyone being at Convention .

Hello.Those who may be able to answer your question are out of the office this week and next attending the ARBA annual convention. We will hold your email until they return.

Thank you.
ARBA
 

Sharon You arejust too darned Sweet , < come here and letme give you a noogie > thanks again .:thanks:
 

Paging Doc Nock , Paging Doc Nock , How closely related are English Spot and Checkards?and how easily is one passed off for the otherwhen young?

Shadow That Chocolate Spot, I know why it was Auctioned and when you speak to her explain ONE does NOT put vicious big rabbits in the auction without some warning .
 

pamnock

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The Checkered is much larger than the Spot, and the markings are different as well (the Giant has no chain)--even a poorly marked individual would not likely bemistaken for the other.

The Checkered was derived from the Flemish Giant, the English Spot is believed to be of similar ancestry. The Spot originated in England and the Checkered in Germany approx. 200 years ago.Bob Whitman has written some excellent articles (published in the ARBA's Domestic Rabbits as well as his book "Domestic Rabbits &Their Histories"). The progression in the development and refinement of the Checkered's markings is very interesting.

Pam
 

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