Do Lionhead Bunnies dig?

Discussion in 'Housing and Environment' started by pkwhammy, Jul 30, 2017.

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  1. Jul 30, 2017 #1

    pkwhammy

    pkwhammy

    pkwhammy

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    I want to fence off a play area outside for my Lionheads. Do they dig? If so, how can I make sure they don't dig under the fence?
     
  2. Jul 30, 2017 #2

    samoth

    samoth

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    Yes!

    All domesticated rabbits dig. They're of the same genus as the European rabbit (oryctolagus, which burrows underground), and different from the American rabbit (sylvilagus, which does not burrow).

    (I'll leave the "how can I" question to other people here who are knowledgeable with keeping rabbits outside.)
     
  3. Jul 30, 2017 #3

    Blue eyes

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    I assume your rabbits are indoors? Indoor rabbits can typically get all the exercise that they need in an indoor, bunny-proofed area. They are used to and are comfortable being indoors so that is where they are most likely to dash about and binky.

    Outdoors can be an occasional outing, but that should only be done under your constant supervision. Otherwise, you would have to create a pen that has mesh wire both under the area (to prevent digging) AND over the area. It would need to be completely covered on top (to prevent predators from getting in -- including birds of prey).

    Rather than messing with all of that, it would be easier to just get an x-pen or two and set that up temporarily outside whenever you want to take them out. This would be when they would need to be constantly watched, with you close by, to keep them safe.

    Of course, this also means being aware of other dangers. The grass can't have fertilizer, weed killer or pesticides. You won't want bunnies to get ticks, mites, or fleas.

    Indoor rabbits that are brought outdoors on occasion will usually do more exploring than actual 'exercising.' The attached shows how I've occasionally let my rabbits outdoors. I prefer to keep them off grass and all the potential nasties grass may have.

    100_8258.jpg
     
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  4. Jul 30, 2017 #4

    Aki

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    They're rabbits. They dig. If you want to take them outside, you have to make a playpen which is very high (at least 1m high or with a 'cover' to prevent them from jumping - don't let their size fool you, any rabbit can jump really high when they've got the proper motivation, some of them can even climb!) and with wire mesh burried under the play area. Or you can try to bury part of the playpen (I'd say at least 50cm which means you need mesh panels of at least 1,50m). I don't put my rabbits outside but I just did that for my tortoise (it's a horsfieldii, so a digger too ^^'). It was a real pain and I spent almost a week knee deep in the mud. But it's done now and it works.
    You might also put hard things like stones or tiles against the sides of of the playpen and come very often to check the rabbits aren't digging. Anyway I wouldn't leave rabbits for a long time outside without supervision because a break-out can happen pretty fast and by the time you notice, the rabbits will be long gone.
     
  5. Jul 30, 2017 #5

    Nancy McClelland

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  6. Jun 12, 2018 #6

    Topher

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    I've had two lionheads for just over a week, in an outside chicken coop that i built (4x4 coop with a 7.5x7.5 foot run, plenty of room. After the first escape, i put hardware cloth 3.5 inches down... Then they escaped again. I'm going to now go as far as Google suggested next... At least 10 inches down with a lateral part (going in or out from the wall). Luckily, my rabbits just jump to the neighbors to eat the flowers, so we've got them back both times, but it's frustrating.

    So yes, lionheads dig. I will come back and let you know if they get out after i go 10 inches and laterally with hardware cloth
     
  7. Jun 13, 2018 #7

    Lhart

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    My lionhead digs more than any other bunny I've owned. She actually dug an arm-deep burrow into the ground! I wouldn't recommend attempting to make a bunny-proof area outside. It's just too much trouble.
     
  8. Jun 13, 2018 #8

    Popsicles

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    Can put them on patio if you have any? Prevents digging and also good to wear down nails
     
  9. Jun 14, 2018 #9

    Rachele

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    I have an outdoor pen with bunnies and I found that if you lay chicken wire down it stops the digging if not they WILL get out...

    Also attach the wire to the sides of the pen
     
  10. Jun 15, 2018 #10

    hamsterdance

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    All rabbits can dig, but I do have to say out of the five rabbits I have owned, only one is a lion head, and she is the only one that has dug a lot and kicked her litter box out. After getting spayed it improved but at the age of 4 now she still is a bit of a digger.
     

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