Covered Litter Boxes

Discussion in 'Housing and Environment' started by lavendertealatte, Feb 19, 2018.

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  1. Feb 19, 2018 #1

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    Does anyone on here use one or have tried using a hooded litter box? The idea being that they would contain odor better and also look better.

    There is a girl on youtube whose rabbit uses one, but I've heard other people say in an old 2008 thread that their rabbits won't because there is only one entrance/exit.
    This is the one she has, but without the door --
    https://www.amazon.com/Catit-Jumbo-...1519011058&sr=1-4&keywords=covered+litter+box

    Would the average rabbit use it?

    //edit// oops I just saw someone else brought this up on a thread... how do I delete this..
    //edit// oh wait they're talking about grates.. so that's something different.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018
  2. Feb 19, 2018 #2

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

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    I'm cheap--put a litter pan in an apple box from the store and cut holes in both ends and all of ours like it.
     
  3. Feb 19, 2018 #3

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    I wouldn't use a covered one like that. There is no need. Perhaps you are over thinking the litter box. A rabbit litter box should never be smelly - seriously -- unless it is in need of cleaning. With one rabbit and daily additions of hay to a large litter box, I have no odor whatsoever for 5-7 days (usually closer to 7). I have our rabbit in the main living area and visitors are amazed that there is no odor at all.

    Another thought is that if a covered litter box held in any odor, that would be even worse for bunny. That would mean that bunny has to inhale that odor everytime he goes in the box.

    That said, I do put the litter box in the back of the cage and under the shelf.(bottom photo) It gives them a little more privacy which they seem to like for going potty. It just isn't tightly enclosed like the lidded cat litter box.

    If you'd like it more contained than a low litter box, something like this can work. This is used for rabbits that tend to lift the rear-ends up too high when they piddle.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018
  4. Feb 19, 2018 #4

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

    lavendertealatte

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    I like how contained that first picture is. I've heard of some bunnies lifting their bums too high. Wonder how common this is? I'd probably have to get something stronger than scissors to do a cutout like that eh?

    The litter box under the shelf looks nice too, private. Do your rabbits roam in the living room area? Do you find that you need to have a second litter box out or is the one in their enclosure enough?

    I'd like to avoid having a litter box out for all to see if possible.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2018 #5

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    I don't think it is real common for rabbits to be "high end lifters" but there are some. I've never had one (fortunately). I think a box cutter (razor blade) would cut through the plastic.

    My rabbits had all day access to the living room, dining room, kitchen and hallway. I did not use an extra litter box -- just the one in the cage. Never found a need to have a box outside the cage. The trick is to be sure to expand their roaming area gradually. That way they always know where the litter box is.

    For example, for the rabbits first wanderings out of their cage, I'd use the x-pen to contain the area. This limit helps them to feel not overwhelmed with too much space too soon. It also helps prevent potty accidents since they can easily find their way back. It helps them to transition to having space to roam. Once they're comfortable with the new space, the area can be enlarged.

    (I'm a visual learner, so I like to include photos to show what I mean.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018
  6. Feb 20, 2018 #6

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

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    I've had 2 that would be in the box, but with their hind at the very edge, so I put cardboard down on the floor and would swap every couple of days for new pieces.
     
  7. Feb 21, 2018 #7
  8. Feb 21, 2018 #8

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

    Blue eyes

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    Haha! Yes, it isn't uncommon for a bunny to lounge in the litter box -- it is soft, after all.

    With my set up (adding hay on top twice per day), the litter box isn't yucky on top, so no worries even if one chooses to lay in there.

    I think they like that feeling of the sides perhaps (?) You can see how mine liked this cushy bed as an alternative to lounging in the litter box. Unfortunately, it only lasted so long before they decided to chew it.
     
  9. Feb 22, 2018 #9

    samoth

    samoth

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    My doe does this, but high-sides cat litterboxes work perfectly.
     

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