Bunny Ebola, how to prevent?

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Donnie Rabbit

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Hey guys, I have a lionhead/Dutch Dwarf mix and he is an old boy (10) and I'm worried about this new virus that is sweeping the Southern US. It is only a matter of time that it reaches everyone. We need to know what to do to prevent it from infecting our little fur babies. Does anyone have any knowledge? I just read that it can be carried on shoes, and unfortunately it is a very hardy virus and can survive in water, heat etc. Any info that is out there would be great. Thanks!
 

zuppa

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Hi, we just had a chat about it yesterday, there's no way to prevent it at the moment since vaccines are not available in the US, here's a link to that thread

>>RHDV2 and Biosecurity

I think we'll have more threads on it created on RO so maybe moderators could just join them into one superthread for people to share information
 

Donnie Rabbit

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I know :( I'm thinking precautions to avoid spreading it to my bun. What are common forms of transmission to rabbits that are 100% indoors, if they are known.
 

Eve84

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Can’t you just order vaccines from elsewhere and do it yourselves or pay for the vet to do it? Maybe you ask for loads of people to join and do a joint vaccine party at the vet?
Eve
 

Blue eyes

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Can’t you just order vaccines from elsewhere and do it yourselves or pay for the vet to do it? Maybe you ask for loads of people to join and do a joint vaccine party at the vet?
Eve
If it would be that easy...

Since the vaccines are not yet approved in the US, vets have to request permission from the USDA to import from overseas. They also have to have documented cases in the state before making the request. Some have done this but it takes weeks (or longer) to get it. There is a list at rabbit.org of vets that may have the vaccine.
 

Blue eyes

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The House Rabbit Society has a ton of info on this topic.

Included on that link is the following:

How to Protect Your Rabbits
Biosecurity measures are essential to protect your rabbit in an outbreak, even if they are vaccinated.
  • House your rabbits indoors. We strongly recommend that rabbits be kept indoors, or in enclosed environments, and not allowed outdoor playtime. Rabbits who live outdoors and those who exercise outdoors are at greater risk of contracting this disease.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before handling your rabbits, particularly when you come home from places where other rabbits may have been, or where people who have been in contact with rabbits may have been, including feed stores, pet stores, fairgrounds, humane societies, etc.
  • Adopt a “no shoes in the house” policy, or keep your bunnies from running in high traffic areas of your home.
  • Trim your rabbit’s nails and groom them at home. Learn how to trim your rabbit’s nails and groom them at home, instead of taking them to a rescue or vet’s office, which are higher-risk locations.
  • Change your clothes and wash your hands after handling or coming in contact with other rabbits. Wash these clothes twice in hot water and dry in the dryer before wearing around your rabbit.
  • Don’t let your rabbit come into physical contact with other rabbits from outside your home, for example, “hoppy hour” or “bunny playground” activities.
  • If you volunteer at a shelter in an area with an outbreak, have special clothes and shoes that you wear only at the shelter. You may want to wear shoe covers or plastic bags over your shoes, secured with a rubber band. When you leave the shelter, remove the bags and dispose of them before you get into your car, making sure not to touch the outside of the bag. Follow clothes laundering instructions above, and shoe disinfecting instructions below. This protects the shelter rabbits as well as your own. The same considerations apply to anyone who sees rabbits at work and also has rabbits at home.
  • To disinfect shoes that may have been contaminated, place the shoes in a bath containing one of the below disinfectants. The shoes must be in contact with the disinfectant for the required contact time, during which time the disinfectant must remain wet. Be sure to read the label instructions for contact time for your disinfectant.
  • Use an effective disinfectantfor this virus. Clean the item first, then disinfect. Read all disinfectant instructions and safety information provided by the manufacturer before using. Ask your veterinarian about how to obtain these:
    • accelerated hydrogen peroxide (Prevail, Rescue wipes or solution (formerly “Accel”), and Peroxigard)
    • sodium hypochlorite, household bleach(1:10 dilution = 1.5c bleach (12oz) in 1 gallon water)
      • organic matter inactivates bleach, so be sure the item is thoroughly cleaned with soap and water before disinfecting
      • Check the label on the bleach to make sure it is intended for disinfection, and not expired
      • Never mix bleach with other cleaning products
      • Animals must be removed from the area when bleach is used
      • Wear gloves when handling bleach, and use in a well-ventilated area
      • Once diluted, bleach loses efficacy after 24 hours
      • Wet contact time must be maintained on the surface for at least 10 minutes
      • Following disinfection, bleach should be rinsed off and surface dried before animal contact
    • potassium peroxymonosulfate (1% Virkon S, Trifectant)
    • substituted phenolics
  • Disinfect objects using one of the disinfectants above. Remember it must stay in contact with the item and remain wet for the required contact time of the disinfectant.
  • Know your sources of hay and feedand if they are near areas of any outbreaks.
  • Do not feed plants, grasses, or tree branches foraged from outside in areas where there is an outbreak.
  • Minimize insects in your home by installing window and door screens. Eliminate mosquitoes and flies from your home.
  • Use monthly flea treatment (Revolution or Advantage II are safe for rabbits. NEVER use Frontline on rabbits) for rabbits and cats and dogs, in an area with an outbreak, especially if any pets in the home go outside.
  • Keep cats indoors, so they can’t bring in the virus from outside.
  • Homes with dogs and rabbits: Keep dogs on-leash outside, so they don’t directly interact with wild rabbits (alive or deceased). Consider having your dog wear booties outside, or washing dogs’ paws when coming inside. Designate separate areas in your home for your dog and block dog access to areas where your rabbits live or exercise.
  • Quarantine any new rabbit for at least 14 days. Always handle quarantined rabbits last, and keep all supplies for them separate from your other rabbits’ supplies.
  • If you see a dead rabbit outside do not touch them. Contact state wildlife officials if it appears to be a wild rabbit. By reporting any dead rabbits seen outside, you will help protect domestic rabbits, as we will know where the disease is spreading.
 

Eve84

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If it would be that easy...

Since the vaccines are not yet approved in the US, vets have to request permission from the USDA to import from overseas. They also have to have documented cases in the state before making the request. Some have done this but it takes weeks (or longer) to get it. There is a list at rabbit.org of vets that may have the vaccine.
I didn’t say it would be easy but maybe worth a try. I just can’t believe that we have this vaccine since years and you don’t. That’s pretty unfair and also unreasonable and that makes me sad.
What I thought is , they might not have the vaccine as this illnesses are not very often/ common in the US and the vaccines cost a lot specially if you just buy a very few and not loads.
My vet for example told me that he bought loads of vaccines in a set for 500 samples I could imagine if he only bought 20 samples it would have been much more expensive.

Eve
 

Blue eyes

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I know you were just trying to offer suggestions. It's just that we cannot order the vaccines ourselves. Not all vets can order it either. They have to be USDA-certified vets AND they have to have documented cases in their area. Then they have to apply for special permission. 😖

Apparently the making of the vaccine in the US is going through the slow process of approval. It hasn't been a priority in the past simply because it was so very rare for the disease to manifest here. Hopefully they will kick it into high gear now with this sudden outbreak.
 

Eve84

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It’s just always so annoying that the paper work takes so long, specially if they could Have saved some life’s In that time.

It’s also horrible that this disease has found its way to your county and that so many wild rabbits will die from it too, as you mentioned beforehand that you have loads in your garden - area nearby. Which also puts your rabbit on a big risk too.

And all of that in this Corona time, as Corona wouldn’t cause enough worry already.
Feeling sorry
Eve
 
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