2 new rabbits, 4 months old

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Hi.. I'm Steve, an owner of 2 bunnies 4 months old, bonded sisters. They are getting along great after 2 weeks of having them at home, living with me and my daughter as indoor pets.
I'm aware of letting them have their space and not crowding them or forcing them into situations that might stress them out.
They seem to be quite happy but are shy around me and don't let me or my daughter make physical contact with them much at all. Again we don't push for it as its early days but can anyone suggest some ways that might help them relax around us and to trust us more please?
 

Blue eyes

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Congratulations! And great for you that you've been giving them time to get adjusted.

Aaah... as I was just typing, I saw you post your second reply. I'm assuming your 2 girls are still intact? They are at the age where hormones kick in. I'll explain more about this below. Just wanted to post this while you are still on.
 

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When those hormones kick in, their behavior can change. With some, the change is barely noticeable; with others it is a jekyll & hyde turn around. Rabbits aren't considered bonded until after their hormones have dissipated. You could check around for some local, rabbit-savvy vets to see about getting them spayed. Once spayed, they'll need some time to heal and then can be re-introduced to each other.

In the meantime, keep a very close eye. That humping can escalate and even turn into outright aggression. Don't want that to happen or it could sabotage their ability to bond for real after they are fixed.

Ideally, they can be spayed asap. Until then, they can be housed in side-by-side pens so they are still near each other but not able to injure each other.

I was originally going to link to the page on my website about bonding with your rabbit (to answer your first question). That explains in more detail how one can go about that process. I'll still put that link here:

But for the question about bonding rabbits (and the need to spay), I'll link that page here as well as that may be the more pressing situation at the moment:
 
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Hello Steve and welcome! I concur with everything Blue Eyes posted and will re-emphasis the importance of spaying! I have two sisters and love them to pieces. I got them when they were around 12 weeks old and had absolutely no problem with bonding. They are a year old now and still very much bonded. The humping you are seeing is completely normal but realize that this may still happen occasionally even after spayed. This is because humping is also, a form of showing dominance. My dominant female will still hump her sister when she gets excited over food. If she hears the treats bag and her sister gets to me first she will try to start humping her “I’m the boss, I’m getting my treat first” type of behavior. This happens over toys, blankets, favorite sleeping spots, etc. All of this is normal behavior but always be on the lookout for biting or more aggressive attacks. This could mean something different, perhaps pain or discomfort.
You also, mentioned the shy behavior. From my experience, this will vary from rabbit to rabbit. The two girls that I have now do not like to be picked up but I do it anyway for transporting them from one place to another and to let them know that they can trust me. Rabbits, in general do not like to be scooped up and lifted far from the floor. My suggestion is to get down low, pick them up and put them against your chest before standing. This will eliminate the feeling like a huge hawk just picked them up and is about to make dinner of them.
Frequent interaction with your bunnies is the best way for them to bond to you and your daughter. Find ways to play with them and reward them for coming up to you by giving them a treat but make sure to limit those treats…too many can cause health problems.
Good luck with your new family members!
 
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Hi guys. After the last time I texted about the rabbits mounting, the behaviour soon stopped and they've been happy getting along with each other. (I haven't had them fixed as have been told that if theyre happy theres no need) However over the last couple of days the behaviour has started again but the other one is doing it now and I've just noticed some fluid coming from the one doing the mounting when they separate! I think one might be a boy after seeing this! But I haven't handled them, (picked them up) as I've adopted the idea of not picking them up and stressing them out as I've heard they don't like it. So I'm not able to check them physically to see what genetals they have. I'm worried I might have a litter of rabbits in a month that I have no idea what to do with!
 
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I know all this sounds very amateurish, but i assure you I have the best intentions for them and a happy longterm life ahead! I've attached a picture of a piece of cardboard that I put in their enclosure within the flat, that was clean and not marked 2 days ago. But I've just noticed this stain on it, does this look familiar to anyone? I've got my theories! 😭20220511_212503.jpg
 

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JBun replied to your concern in the separate post. In the future, please do not duplicate inquiries so people know the latest information and don't miss what has already been mentioned!
 

Blue eyes

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This thread's follow up is at...
 
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