The Smallest, Friendliest, Easiest Breed?

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Troller

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Hi folks. A thought has been germinating in my soft gray layers about possibly getting my mother a rabbit. For those who know a bit about me here the originally the idea was if my Flemish Doe doesn't bond with my buck that I'd give her to my mom and help take care of her. However having the doe I just don't think that's feasible since I fell hard for her and I think I can make it work.

Brings me back to my momma though. She lives by herself, isn't in the best shape but can nominally take care of a pet. In fact she had a dog but my brother took it in after she got sick, and after 8 months when my mom got better his kids fell in love with the dog. My mom didn't want to fight him on this or deprive the kids, but she does miss a pet. She says she doesn't want one, I think she's a bit afraid is all of losing another one like that.

So of course I might not do it at all, but if I did get her a rabbit what's the smallest, friendliest and easiest breed? I know breeds are generalities, but it helps. I also know small breeds tend to be more energetic, which if there is a lazier type that would help. I'll most likely have to do the bigger cleaning so I'd think smaller is better since I got my giants at my own home to contend with. Thanks for the help.
 

KaylaBun

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Bunnies are like dogs, smaller the more hyper/nippy they might be. Bigger rabbis tendo be much nicer and relaxed. a Flemish would be great
 

agnesthelion

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These are, like you said, generalities. I hate to assign certain characteristics to certain breeds because all traits can be found in all breeds but I know you know that :)

My Lionhead is a total joy. And I've heard the same about most lionheads. The downfall is grooming. However, grooming isnt a physically demanding job and can be an enjoyable bonding activity for human and bun.

I've heard great things about Dutches. My BFFs bunny was a dutch, lovely personality.

Mini rexes are very popular too. I think they might be the most intelligent but calm, not sure. Arch is my challenging bun ;) so he might be the exception. Also, Rex fur is sooo soft but it flies everywhere!

Holland lops are still one of my favorite breeds look wise. I think they are so cute and look like babies their whole lives :) I've heard good things about their personalities too. I have heard some can be complainers a bit, but nothing to where I would avoid the breed entirely for.
The breeds I would stay away from are Netherlands. The majority of them I do meet are jumpy and a bit grumpy.
 

JBun

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I've had several holland's over the year's, and though the one I have now is a big grump, haha, all my other one's have been very sweet and pretty calm rabbits. It, of course, will depend on the individual rabbit, but holland lops may be a good one to look in to.
 

cerigirl

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I have rex's and it can go either way. My dads rex and Petals (my foster) are both temperamental. On the other hand my mom's rex who just recently passed was a sweetie and you could do almost anything to her. Melody is a rex mix and a sweetie. He would have made an awesome therapy bun when he was younger. I dont have to worry about any of the kids with him. Melody will let them do anything to him or just hop off to his hidey hole if he doesnt want the attention.
 

cerigirl

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Oh I forgot to mention that while Petals is a foster, my dad has had his rex since he was 6 or 7 weeks old. Sonny is just a big grump with an attitude.
 

BunnyWabbit

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I don't think there's an "easiest type" of rabbit. They're all unique.

I wouldn't surprise your mother with a rabbit. They are a lot of work and I would definitely make sure she's ready/willing/able to take on the responsibility and cost of one. Rabbits are not for everyone.

Have you considered approaching the subject of getting a cat with her? They would be easier/less expensive to care for than a rabbit.
 

hannah_biota

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When we started researching breeds we had ALL of the same preferences as you & will be getting a Holland Lop. Since we will be showing we needed to pick a breed before picking a rabbit, so we did rely heavily on the generalizations & the breed definitely fit the bill for us. Since you will be getting a pet, a good option would be to adopt an adult and keep yourselves open to various breeds/mixes. Just let the rescue know what you are looking for & they can recommend bunnies that would be a good match.

I have had cats all my life, they are definitely not easy or cheap pets & are more of a time commitment as they often live well into their teens and sometimes early twenties.
 

woahlookitsme

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I was definitely going to suggest a cat instead also. . .I think they are generally an easy keeper much like rabbits. And have similar qualities. Of course cats would go to the vet yearly and have shots so they can be more expensive not to mention yearly flea and heartworm control. It really depends on your mom. I definitely wouldn't surprise her but maybe go to a shelter nearby that has cats and rabbits and see if there is one she might like.
 

whitelop

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I had a mini lop that was a total lump. haha. She was the most easy going, relaxed bun ever. She didn't like to be held but that was my fault because I didn't hold her enough as a baby, but other than that she was great. She was pretty easy to litter train too.

My dutch now has turned out to be a pretty good rabbit too. She is VERY smart and she was a total breeze to litter train. She's small, even for her breed so she isn't much rabbit at all. She loves to be held and loved on. BUT she is a little hyperactive, I don't know if its because she's a baby; but most of the time a good box to play in/on will suffice and shes happy as a clam.

Thats my only experience and people who have had those breeds before could say other things about their mini lops or dutches, but I've been really lucky to get really good buns both times.

PS. I have cats, I dislike my cats. They get old and go crazy and start to poop in your house. No one wants that!
 

missyscove

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I souldnt surprise anyone with any pet.

If your mother agrees that she wants a rabbit, why not take her to a shelter or a rescue where you can meet adult rabbits and get to know their personalities. Generally those folks know which rabbits would work for which people as well.
 

DUSTBUNNY-CLYDE

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you could get a gift certificate for the animal shelter for her. then both of you could pick one out together. there's pure and mixed breed bunnies there and you could find a personality that fits your mom's!!!
 
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Have you shared stories of your specific rabbits with your mother? has she met either of them? I'd start there. Some of my friends seem to think the cost of feeding a giant rabbit would be overwhelming, while others are totally into it and ask me other questions about rabbit care in general. My best friend's 9-year-old son showed a lot of interest in Monty when he met her, but I made sure to mention it takes a lot of work to get a bunny to be friendly, and you have to spend a lot of time every day with them, etc.

What I'm trying to get at, is to gauge her amount of interest in a rabbit specifically, and talk it over with her. I think a giant would be great for her. No grooming required (occasional plucking/brushing during a molt), they loaf about reasonably once they're past being babies (*looks over at toe-twitching flopped Monty*), and so on and so forth but you know all of this already :)
 

OakRidgeRabbits

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For a smaller, easier rabbit, I'd recommend Polish or Mini Lops.

Temperaments are very individual and it can be difficult to make general blanket statements. Usually the way they're raised and cared for early in their lives makes a huge difference. But overall, those are the two smaller breeds that are generally very mellow.
 

Troller

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Thanks all, very good suggestions. My mom is timid so I can ask and talk to her abot getting a rabbit and she'll say no because of her numerous fears. She said the same about the dog, but when she has her Maltese in her life she lit up and accepted it fully. It crushed her when the dog got taken away. So I'm not sure what she would like in the end.

Now I'd do a big rabbit as some have suggested, but having dealt with my lovable big breeds I think it might be a bit hard for her when it comes time to handle. Plus, since i know Ill have to handle her grunge work Id rather help to clean after of a smaller rabbit especially since I'm a 20min drive away. I noticed cats mentioned, my mom had cats before and she doesn't like them much. Again I'm all around musing here is all if I should even do anything.
 

woahlookitsme

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I really think going to look at bunnies and helping her pick one out would be very cool and a bonding moment for you and her. Every rabbit is different and shelters should allow visits so to can get a glimpse of how she and the rabbit react to each other
 
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Tauntz

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I'll just toss this suggestion in. If you would be willing to give another bunny a home should it not work with your mother then I suggest you & your mom go bunny "shopping" together. If she finds one she would like & you feel would work for you & your bunny family as well, then maybe go for it. If for some reason the bunny doesn't work out for your mother then you can just take him/her in. Any pet you plan on getting with/for your mom I would be sure to take into consideration that you will eventually have the responsibility of either providing it with a home or caring for it or having to find it another good home. I applaud your considering helping your mother find a good pet to love. I think it really does add to the quality of life especially of older people who don't have as much of a social outlet. It also helps to give them another reason to get up in the mornings as well as entertainment & companionship.
 

BunnyWabbit

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Do you have a rescue nearby? You could help her pick out a bunny and she could foster to adopt to make sure it fits in with her lifestyle before making a forever home commitment.

An adult, already altered, rabbit would be best in my opinion. No crazy hormones and generally tidier. I would also suggest picking a bunny based on personality instead of breed.
 

EMMIE

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Personally i say get an adult rescue cat (preferably male). With a rabbit she may not see it and fall over it (i have done this several times), whereas a cat can jump out of the way. When she wants to cuddle the pet she would have to bend down to get the rabbit whereas a cat would jump up onto the chair ect. Cats do their mess outside so not much work on that front. Hope you consider a cat as they really can make great pets, especially for the elderly. :)
 

Troller

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Well I thoroughly discussedit with her this weekend and it seems she's thought about this on her own. Didn't expect that since it's a bit out of character but she wants another dog eventually. So, guess I'll be trying to help out with that. Thanks all for your time and suggestions.
 
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