Should I get my cat a companion?

Discussion in 'Let Your Hare Down' started by TeamSmudge, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. Jan 23, 2018 #1

    TeamSmudge

    TeamSmudge

    TeamSmudge

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    I've had my male cat (Neutered) for 6/7 years this year. He was adopted from the RSPCA when I was nearly 6ish. He came with a sister but at my age I played with her a little roughly and invaded her space-bubble alot.

    When I moved the year before last we left his sister behind - she had virtually adopted the neighbours and was only coming home for food. They didn't get along the best anyways as he was always bigger and would scare her away.

    I've been thinking of saving for another pet for a while now, I've narrowed it down to a cat. We'd probably be looking to get a rescue kitten but I'm not sure if my current kitty would cope and I don't want to do anything that would hurt my cat or the would be kitten physically or emotionally.

    I would be grateful for any advice

    - TeamSmudge
     
  2. Jan 23, 2018 #2

    stevesmum

    stevesmum

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    Um no. I’ve seen your other post about your mom being reluctant to spend money on the pets you do have, adding more would just complicate things wouldn’t it?
    Vet care can be very expensive and it’s something people don’t factor in often enough when thinking about adoption. If I were you I’d just heap extra love on the pets I already have.
     
  3. Jan 23, 2018 #3

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    I don’t think you should get another animal, you left his sister to the neighbors when the cat was your family’s that should had taken care of her and not the neighbors. My family took care of a rabbit which had run away and there owner didn’t take the responsibility to capture her or even feed her.

    Better focus on the animals you have a make it better for your bunny, which you said before didn’t have the best. It’s not guaranteed the kitten will be accepted by your cat when he didn’t accept his sister which he had been with all his life.
     
  4. Jan 28, 2018 #4

    TeamSmudge

    TeamSmudge

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    Umm you really shouldn't make assumptions before knowing the full story.
    Both of my cats were adopted from the SPCA and she was just more traumatized then the other right from the start. Her brother bullied her and she sneaked in to get food once or twice a day. If my Mum or I tried to get closer then about eight meters she would run off. She started to go to the neighbours where she felt safe away from her brother. They even treated her for fleas as we couldn't get near.

    When the time came to move we couldn't catch her - the food bowl was by the catflap and if we moved it she wouldn't eat. She had already found a home with our neighbours and they loved her (And still do) very much. My Mum gave our neighbour food and flea treatment for her and they were more then happy as she spend all of her time there other then eating. I actually sat by my Mums sliding door for as long as I could before we went as I knew she sometimes sat on the fence bordering our two properties.

    We have stayed in contact with her new family and she is doing great. It was heartwrenching to say goodbye but we definitely NOT abandon her. She was nevers truly ours to abandon anyway.
     
  5. Jan 28, 2018 #5

    RavenousDragon

    RavenousDragon

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    Cats to often pair bond, like rabbits-- but they can also pair bond to a human. Cats often don't pair bond with an individual brought into the household later (best to adopt them at the same time if you have hopes of bonding them). I would vote no because it's just too hard to pair bond two cats when one is already established. Maybe you could work on bonding with him yourself instead (more successful probably) and be his pair bond? I'm my cat's bondmate and she's quite happy.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2018 #6

    Susannah

    Susannah

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    It all depends on the individual cat...we have two cats, brothers that we bought...after a few years a homeless cat wandered into our yard - we fed her for some weeks and one night she walked into our home...it took around 12 months for our two to bond to her, they didn't fight or anything like that, just ignored her and wouldn't play. Now, she is their constant companion...
    Having any animal, involves a lot of commitment, both financially and emotionally - this is what I try and instill in folk thinking of obtaining an animal companion...a pet is a lifelong commitment - vet bills, food, toys, housing, bedding, treats and most of all, your commitment of time and energy - in order to fulfill that animal's health, happiness and contentment.
    Also, something most don't factor in, is what will be come of that animal should you die, or are no-longer able to care for it...find someone whom is willing to take responsibility, Before you get the pet...pet ownership, or contemplating an animal is not to be taken lightly.
    My advice is to heap lots of love on your present cat, 'til you can afford all of the above by yourself...All My Best for your senior lad.
     

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