New outdoor shed

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Joined
Jul 9, 2023
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Location
Lodi, California
Hello everybody so I’m having a shed delivered on Friday I’m going to insulate it put lighting in it and put a heater & AC in it. it will be connected to the outside enclosure through a tunnel from Omlet.
I wanted to know what to put on the walls that won’t hurt the bunnies. I know I can’t put sheet rock because they will eat that. Any and all ideas would be wonderful.
Thank you in advance!
 
You could try a hardboard paneling. There's the white one that's the dry erase surface, that might be chew resistant if all the edges are properly covered. Or there's a vinyl wall cover used in bathrooms, called FRP, but it does have to be put as a covering over a hard wall surface, like sheetrock. Or you can do sheetrock and just put up clear polycarbonate or polycarbonate playpen panels, FRP, or even wire playpen panels, just around the bottom of the wall a couple feet high, to protect the parts of the wall exposed to potential chewing. Then there's using wood to cover the walls, though it might get chewed some, especially if there are any ridges or edges.

I would opt for the FRP, polycarbonate, or white hardboard, whether the whole wall or just covering sheetrock and the parts of the wall that need chew protection, as the smooth surfaces will be the easiest to keep clean, over using any wire panel protection, which has a tendency to collect floating bunny fur on the wire. FRP protecting the bottom of sheetrock walls, or using white hardboard for the walls, may be the most affordable options.

Be aware that some building materials off gas, particularly ones with glues, lacquers, etc. So in an enclosed environment with pets with sensitive respiratory systems, that might be something to keep in mind when selecting certain materials, though I can't say which ones in particular might be an irritant.

https://bunnyproof.com/clear-acrylic-bunny-proofing-enclosures.html
Outdoor Rabbit Housing

https://www.rabbitsonline.net/threads/outdoor-cages-post-your-photo.96732/
One thing I would recommend setting up in the shed is a wifi thermometer, that you can get alerts with if inside temperatures change too much. I've heard of instances where a sheds AC has cut out, and if you have hot summer temps, it's essential to be able to monitor this for the safety of the rabbit(s).
 
You could try a hardboard paneling. There's the white one that's the dry erase surface, that might be chew resistant if all the edges are properly covered. Or there's a vinyl wall cover used in bathrooms, called FRP, but it does have to be put as a covering over a hard wall surface, like sheetrock. Or you can do sheetrock and just put up clear polycarbonate or polycarbonate playpen panels, FRP, or even wire playpen panels, just around the bottom of the wall a couple feet high, to protect the parts of the wall exposed to potential chewing. Then there's using wood to cover the walls, though it might get chewed some, especially if there are any ridges or edges.

I would opt for the FRP, polycarbonate, or white hardboard, whether the whole wall or just covering sheetrock and the parts of the wall that need chew protection, as the smooth surfaces will be the easiest to keep clean, over using any wire panel protection, which has a tendency to collect floating bunny fur on the wire. FRP protecting the bottom of sheetrock walls, or using white hardboard for the walls, may be the most affordable options.

Be aware that some building materials off gas, particularly ones with glues, lacquers, etc. So in an enclosed environment with pets with sensitive respiratory systems, that might be something to keep in mind when selecting certain materials, though I can't say which ones in particular might be an irritant.

https://bunnyproof.com/clear-acrylic-bunny-proofing-enclosures.html
Outdoor Rabbit Housing

https://www.rabbitsonline.net/threads/outdoor-cages-post-your-photo.96732/
One thing I would recommend setting up in the shed is a wifi thermometer, that you can get alerts with if inside temperatures change too much. I've heard of instances where a sheds AC has cut out, and if you have hot summer temps, it's essential to be able to monitor this for the safety of the rabbit(s).
Thanks that’s a very good idea but they will have access to a 9’ x 9’ x 9’ enclosure through a tunnel system that I bought through Omlet.
 
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