Anyone know anything about Terrapins?

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

irishbunny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2008
Messages
5,360
Reaction score
10
Location
Clare, , Ireland
So my Mam was talking about how she wants to get a turtle, the only pets we've ever had have always been of the furry kind so it would be something different. I suggested the little terrapins that are really popular in the pet shop. Of course it will be me that does all the research and care of them if we do get them. Thing is I know zilch about turtley creatures. Can anyone suggest any good sites about different kinds of terrapins/turtles you can get as pets? A lot of research needs to be done before I would even consider getting them. Anything like snakes/lizards/turtles seems complicated to me since I'm used to the basic cat/dog/bunny type animals :p
 

degrassi

Valerie - Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
1,162
Reaction score
12
Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
First you need to decide what specific species you want as different species require different care.

Not sure what the common pet store turtle is in Ireland but here its Red eared sliders.

Turtles are harder(and more expensive) to keep then some of the other reptiles. Find out what species you want and do a LOT of research. Also be aware they live for a LONG LONG time.
 

mmfh

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
106
Reaction score
4
Location
central, Pennsylvania, USA
Water turtles are more difficult and messier than a land turtle. Make sure u know what adult size they will grow to. Make sure u are willing to provide a diverse vegetable diet to meet their diatary requirements and add calcium. Turtles eat alot and and are not a cheap pet and vet bills are large. All turtles need extremely clean water or the end up with eye Nd shell problems. All turtles carry salmonella so be aware of hygiene issues. Be careful what type of bedding u use because they can end up getting inpacted. Reptile magazine had a great article on proper bedding a couple months ago. Plus mosg turtles need a heat lamp to bask under and a uvb light for proper shell growth. The uvb light needs changed at least every 6 months and run about 30$. After all that if u feel a turtle is a good animal then go for it. I'd recomment a leopard or russian tortoise for a first time owner. Good luck.
 

EileenH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2007
Messages
666
Reaction score
3
Location
Long Island, New York, USA
I like this turtle forum:
http://www.turtleforum.com/forum/upload/index.php?showforum=111

I have a Red-eared Slider. She's great but water turtles are a lot of work. I agree with what everyone else has said: good lighting is crucial, diverse diet, and be prepared for a pet that can last around 80 years...(water turtles can live about 40, land turtles much much more..)

Also, see if you have a local rescue. There are usually many turtles for adoption around my way..

Here's a link to rescues in the UK: http://www.animalrescuers.co.uk/html/reptilesetc.html
 

Ape337

April
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
703
Reaction score
57
Location
Delaware, USA
Hi!
I'm new to the forum but i had a leopard tortise for years. I would not recommend any desert tortise for a beginner, unless your climate is very dry, and you can keep it outside for at least part of the year. I am from the mid-atlantic usa and my climate is very humid, which means i couldn't keep my tortise outside at all. Humidity kills desert tortises fast! I unfortunately found this out the hard way in the summer of 2006. The minute i turned off the a/c and opened the windows i accidently killed my precious baby. Year round climate control is paramount.
Also leopard tortises grow to be 16+ inches and over 60 lbs! Minimal enclosure size indoors is 4 feet x 8 feet for an adult. They must have proper lighting as mentioned above, or the shell will deform. Also calcium suppliments are a must.
Strangely enough the diet is similar to a bunny. High fiber, low protein, grass hay, leafy greens. If you google leopard tortise care you
will see some great sites like tortisetrust.org.
Sorry, not trying to scare you away from this species which is quite beautiful, just giving a heads up that it takes a lot of work and care, and i don't want you to experience a tragedy like mine :(
Btw, russian tortises only max out at 10" and i've heard are very good for beginners. Good luck! :)
 

Latest posts

Top