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6? week old kits-mom has another litter. HELP

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CharlieRae

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I have been contacted by a person that has a hoarding situation with rabbits. they are terribly neglected. The emergent situation is 3, 6 week(they think) old kits, whose mother just had another litter and is being aggressive to the older kits. Can I pull them out of moms cage and they will be ok? I have a nursing doe, do i need to flip her and let them nurse once in a while? I need suggestions so these little guys make it. I am taking possession of the doe and her new litter and the 6 week old babies.
 

JBun

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Yes, the 6 week old kits will need to be weaned and separated from mom. I wouldn't let them nurse from the other doe(especially don't put them in with her as she could attack them), I would just wean them. If possible, the best and least stressful way to do this for the kits is to move mom(and her nest box with new kits) to a new cage/pen, and keep the 6 week old kits in their usual cage/pen until 8 weeks and they go to their new homes, or at 10-12 weeks separating them into their own cages/pens.

To best protect their digestive function so weaning enteritis doesn't occur, I wouldn't be giving them any new foods or treats, and would continue with their same brand/type of pellet(as long as it's not causing any major health issues) and would free feed a good quality(no mold, no noxious weeds) grass hay, and making sure they are eating their hay and pellets really well. And keep a very close eye on their bums for any signs of mushy or runny poop. Watery diarrhea or mucous in the poop would be an emergency, but mushy cecotropes with normal fecal poop is usually not an immediate emergency but indicates a need for a diet change(more fiber/hay, less starches/pellets).
 
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CharlieRae

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I unfortunately cannot keep them where they are. They are in an outside hutch that is absolutely disgusting and falling apart. I am bring them and the doe with the new litter to my house and putting them in my rabbit barn. (I breed rabbits and my mom let me know about this bad situation. there are 7 other adult rabbits I am taking in, too. Sore hocks, eye infections, over grown nails. poor things)
I did buy the same brand of food they were being fed. So i guess I will just have to hope for the best.


Yes, the 6 week old kits will need to be weaned and separated from mom. I wouldn't let them nurse from the other doe(especially don't put them in with her as she could attack them), I would just wean them. If possible, the best and least stressful way to do this for the kits is to move mom(and her nest box with new kits) to a new cage/pen, and keep the 6 week old kits in their usual cage/pen until 8 weeks and they go to their new homes, or at 10-12 weeks separating them into their own cages/pens.

To best protect their digestive function so weaning enteritis doesn't occur, I wouldn't be giving them any new foods or treats, and would continue with their same brand/type of pellet(as long as it's not causing any major health issues) and would free feed a good quality(no mold, no noxious weeds) grass hay, and making sure they are eating their hay and pellets really well. And keep a very close eye on their bums for any signs of mushy or runny poop. Watery diarrhea or mucous in the poop would be an emergency, but mushy cecotropes with normal fecal poop is usually not an immediate emergency but indicates a need for a diet change(more fiber/hay, less starches/pellets).
 

JBun

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If you aren't already, I would quarantine them from your own rabbits if at all possible. Reason being is that they could be carrying infectious diseases like pasteurella, coccidiosis, etc. and you don't want these things to get passed to your own rabbits.

Maybe just putting the baby buns in a cage next to their mom will help reduce any moving and weaning stress.

Well done for caring about these buns and trying to help them out. I hope it all goes well and you can get them all healthy and doing well again.
 

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