Would it be detrimental if one of the bunnies is rehomed?

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chofamily

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We rescued our 2nd bunny Popper, a dwarf Hotot, 2 months ago & he is now bonded with our 1st bunny. They’re both younger than 1yr.
Old.
Now, because of the destructive tendencies of this dwarf bunny to chew up everything, my husband says we have to rehome him. Popper is never without items to chew: cardboard, hay cubes, hay, wood. Popper chews thru all these items, and now added the protective mats & pads for his cage & the bunny enclosure. They’re not going to last & the bunny enclosure mats were not inexpensive.
Add to it that when he’s gotten out,he chewed thru all of the wiring for our TV system (which has been replaced) & started on the vacuum (caught him), broom…
due to the destruction & cost of replacing what he’s chewed up, he needs to be rehomed. Even if I build him a bunny condo, my fear is he’ll continue his chewing tendencies.
My concern is that our deaf Lop will become sad w/o his furry friend. The bunnies do get plenty of human interaction & pets; so the Lop will still get that attention.

any advice on if this is a short term issue (lop getting over missing his bunny pal) or potentially depression?

And if there a forum for me to post the rehome request for a new bunny family for Popper? (He comes w/ an XL cage).
thanks
 

FoggyForest

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Same exact thing happened to me. Bandit was a perfect bunny, he never chewed anything. Then Havyn came along, then bonded to Bandit, and then she destroyed the house and the expensive couches. We rehomed her down the street and after that, Bandit was fine. He was still happy as ever, somehow, and continued to be adorably lovey. However, bunnies have personalities like you and me- so, your bunny may not handle the changes as well as mine did!
It depends. You never know, with bunnies.



p.s. popper is such a cute name XD! also you could post the request on these forums, depending on where you live. Try, on the front page of RabbitsOnline >
Pet rabbit discussion > Rescue Me!
Then make a post there ;)
Good luck, chofamily.
 

Blue eyes

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It sounds like you just happened to get lucky with your 1st bunny. Some buns seem to be uninterested in chewing things and it sounds like this is the case with your first bunny.

The 2nd bun sounds to be behaving more typical. I've yet to find a rabbit that wouldn't chew electric cords. It seems to be one of their favorite activities-- if given the opportunity. This is why it is so important to bunny-proof.

The rabbit isn't doing anything he isn't being allowed to do. Part of owning a rabbit is sufficiently bunny-proofing to keep your belongings safe.

What that bunny-proofing entails depends on the individual rabbit. It needs to be tailored to whatever a particular rabbit finds...interesting.

Here's some more info on bunny proofing:
 

JBun

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I'm presuming he's neutered? What type of diet do you feed, and specifically the amount of pellets per day, and any amount of sugary foods or treats? This can sometimes affect a rabbits activity level. What enclosure flooring and mats are you using and that he's destroying? If you're still interested in keeping him, there may be some solutions to help with the issues you're having with him.
 

chofamily

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I'm presuming he's neutered? What type of diet do you feed, and specifically the amount of pellets per day, and any amount of sugary foods or treats? This can sometimes affect a rabbits activity level. What enclosure flooring and mats are you using and that he's destroying? If you're still interested in keeping him, there may be some solutions to help with the issues you're having with him.
Both bunnies are neutered.
Popper is on a diet consisting of: 1/4-1/3 cup pet select rabbit pellets (each bunny has both a pellet bowl, water bowl & hay source in their cage; they both go in the others cage during daytime hours b/c the doors are kept open, so exact amount is unknown), unlimited Timothy hay 2nd cut, fresh greens 2x a day (cilantro or romaine lettuce). The bunnies get some apple slices (3 each), but that’s not every day.
Pee pad in the open area enclosure: EZwhelp Pee Pads for Dogs - Dog & Puppy Training Pads - https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B004F8Z4GS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_TREYZXW5D0ZJCY418QTK?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

these are the cage liners &we use disposable Walmart puppy pee pads on top of them under their litter box & bowls (not the in-cage huts):
RIOUSSI Guinea Pig Fleece Cage Liners, https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B08L93PYNZ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_N4ZYXH30PG02HYA8D651?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
 

chofamily

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Yep. We have. It’s not the cords but the chewing & ripping. The huge heavy duty pad we use in the bunny enclosure protects the carpet & when it’s chewed up & ripped & destroyed, the carpet is exposed & subject to the same treatment. The pad has already been replaced 1x b/c of damage. I’ll upload a corner showing some of it.
 

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JBun

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Ok. So because pellets are a concentrated food, rabbits can fill up on them pretty quickly, and once full they will then look for other things to do to fill up their time with, which can mean getting into trouble and causing destruction. It takes longer for a rabbit to eat the same food weight from loose hay, so eating more loose hay can mean they spend more time eating hay and less time getting into trouble.

If your rabbit is a good hay eater, I would try reducing pellet amounts quite a bit, to see if it helps. 1/4-1/3 cup a day per rabbit, is really way more than is needed for a small dwarf rabbit. At the most I would do 2 tbsp. a day split into two feedings. But for a little dwarf like that, you really could go as low as 1 tsp twice a day if needed, provided the hay you feed isn't too coarse and is a mix of soft leaf and stem, and your rabbit can maintain a healthy weight on this diet.

I would also suggest cutting out high carb foods like fruit, grains, starchy veg, etc. Or at least drastically reduce the amount to no more than a tsp size a day. Then always free fed grass hay, and making sure with the diet changes your rabbit is eating the hay really well( at least a pile the size of your rabbit per day), continues to have healthy looking poop, and is maintaining a healthy body weight.

What this diet change does is cause your rabbit to not fill up on pellets and so has to spend more of his time eating hay instead of getting destructive. Now it's not a cure all and some rabbit proofing is still needed, but it certainly can help with some rabbits.

For flooring, if your rabbits don't have sore hock issues, have you considered a more chew resistant option like a cut of textured vinyl flooring(with outside edges covered to prevent chewing)? But I would try the diet change first, then see if a flooring change might be needed as well.
 

Cinn-a-bun

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We rescued our 2nd bunny Popper, a dwarf Hotot, 2 months ago & he is now bonded with our 1st bunny. They’re both younger than 1yr.
Old.
Now, because of the destructive tendencies of this dwarf bunny to chew up everything, my husband says we have to rehome him. Popper is never without items to chew: cardboard, hay cubes, hay, wood. Popper chews thru all these items, and now added the protective mats & pads for his cage & the bunny enclosure. They’re not going to last & the bunny enclosure mats were not inexpensive.
Add to it that when he’s gotten out,he chewed thru all of the wiring for our TV system (which has been replaced) & started on the vacuum (caught him), broom…
due to the destruction & cost of replacing what he’s chewed up, he needs to be rehomed. Even if I build him a bunny condo, my fear is he’ll continue his chewing tendencies.
My concern is that our deaf Lop will become sad w/o his furry friend. The bunnies do get plenty of human interaction & pets; so the Lop will still get that attention.

any advice on if this is a short term issue (lop getting over missing his bunny pal) or potentially depression?

And if there a forum for me to post the rehome request for a new bunny family for Popper? (He comes w/ an XL cage).
thanks
You can purchase items that cover the cords.
 

beachpaws

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I’m so sorry to hear that your little dwarf is being so destructive. I have two little devils/angels myself and BOTH love cords! I tried to be nice and let them free roam for a few hours a day but they just couldn’t behave. Now, the get to free roam for a few hours in a closed bedroom that doesn’t have much to destroy. If this is an option, try getting the grids to make a cage. I created a three story condo with play pen attached. What I love about the grid cages is that they can be disassembled and reconfigured as often as I would like and I can change the decor for every season and holiday.
Best wishes if you do decide to rehome.
 

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chofamily

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Ok. So because pellets are a concentrated food, rabbits can fill up on them pretty quickly, and once full they will then look for other things to do to fill up their time with, which can mean getting into trouble and causing destruction. It takes longer for a rabbit to eat the same food weight from loose hay, so eating more loose hay can mean they spend more time eating hay and less time getting into trouble.

If your rabbit is a good hay eater, I would try reducing pellet amounts quite a bit, to see if it helps. 1/4-1/3 cup a day per rabbit, is really way more than is needed for a small dwarf rabbit. At the most I would do 2 tbsp. a day split into two feedings. But for a little dwarf like that, you really could go as low as 1 tsp twice a day if needed, provided the hay you feed isn't too coarse and is a mix of soft leaf and stem, and your rabbit can maintain a healthy weight on this diet.

I would also suggest cutting out high carb foods like fruit, grains, starchy veg, etc. Or at least drastically reduce the amount to no more than a tsp size a day. Then always free fed grass hay, and making sure with the diet changes your rabbit is eating the hay really well( at least a pile the size of your rabbit per day), continues to have healthy looking poop, and is maintaining a healthy body weight.

What this diet change does is cause your rabbit to not fill up on pellets and so has to spend more of his time eating hay instead of getting destructive. Now it's not a cure all and some rabbit proofing is still needed, but it certainly can help with some rabbits.

For flooring, if your rabbits don't have sore hock issues, have you considered a more chew resistant option like a cut of textured vinyl flooring(with outside edges covered to prevent chewing)? But I would try the diet change first, then see if a flooring change might be needed as well.
😳 the bunnies are like little dogs begging for their food! Because they don’t know why they’re suddenly limited on their pellets, we’ve resorted to giving them the little they’re getting after we put them to bed in their respective cages. Every morning, the bunnies are clamoring to their empty bowls, looking at me with hopeful eyes. So, to be fair, I’m giving them their 1st day’s serving of greens while they’re still separated (Lop tends to be quicker on the veggie inhale!).
Though it’s like having 2 begging puppies, the diet change has increased the interest in hay consumption & chewing of cardboard, & lessened the digging on the mat by the Hotot. They are more eager for their greens the 2x a day I give them it.
I hope this is what I should expect. Thanks
 

John Wick

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(Admittedly I skimmed through previous replies, so sorry for repetitions)

I see you mention that Popper has "chew(ed) thru" all the cardboard and other objects you provide him, and that's actually great! The best rabbit 'toys' are often the ones they destroy the fastest, so while it is an expense, regularly purchasing things like cardboard cat scratchers and other things you know Popper can redirect that energy to is much cheaper and less stressful than repairing objects you want to use more permanently. I have a similar situation in that my first rabbit has not interest in chewing wires or anything of the matter, however, upon adopting my second rabbit, it was a big wake-up call and learning how to redirect a much higher chewing energy was difficult. In addition to regularly buying hay, I also regularly purchase cheap fleece, cardboard cat scratchers, and hoard toilet paper/paper towel tubes for her!

You can see posts I've made on Reddit for some things I do with my Fable to keep her occupied and protect my dear apartment: Wick & Fable (u/WickandFable) - Reddit
 

JBun

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😳 the bunnies are like little dogs begging for their food! Because they don’t know why they’re suddenly limited on their pellets, we’ve resorted to giving them the little they’re getting after we put them to bed in their respective cages. Every morning, the bunnies are clamoring to their empty bowls, looking at me with hopeful eyes. So, to be fair, I’m giving them their 1st day’s serving of greens while they’re still separated (Lop tends to be quicker on the veggie inhale!).
Though it’s like having 2 begging puppies, the diet change has increased the interest in hay consumption & chewing of cardboard, & lessened the digging on the mat by the Hotot. They are more eager for their greens the 2x a day I give them it.
I hope this is what I should expect. Thanks
Yes, you want them expending their energy working for their food instead of all that extra time spent on destroying things. They'll adapt over the next few weeks and settle down some, but should still get excited at pellet and salad feedings. Though if you find they're scarfing their pellets too fast, scatter feeding can be a good option for that. It becomes an activity they can spend time doing, and it can help minimize the choking hazard of inhaling their pellets too quickly.

Just a note on the cardboard. If they are starting to actually ingest a good amount and aren't just ripping it up and leaving it uneaten for the most part, this can pose a hazard of developing a gut blockage, as cardboard doesn't break down in the gut. In which case I would suggest removing the cardboard.
 

BusterBun

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What I'm gonna say will probably be your least favorite option, but please, hear me out.

Have you considered rehoming them as a bonded pair and adopting new already bonded pair that are less destructive?

I foster unsocialized/extremely timid bunnies so they can be bonded and have a better change at finding wonderful forever homes. In my experience, as much as your first bun loves you, he loves his bonded buddy way more. It sucks, but it true. Both bunny hearts will be so broken if you separate them now -especially the one being given away. We as humans will get over rehoming a bunny we're not bonded to (and one that we are) much more easily than the bunnies will.

And please know, I'm not bunny-shaming you for wanting to rehome a bonded rabbit. Sometimes it's may be better for a bonded pair to find the right home together. You're home sounds lovely. A mellow adult pair (1+ years) would be lucky to have you.
 

BusterBun

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Also...and again, this is purely anecdotal, but dewarf bunnies, especially young ones, have been some of the most destructive little monsters I've ever had the pleasure of meeting. There rescue I volunteer with currently has one that climbs up his expen. Climbs!

He's the friendliest little guy and man does he love people. With enough forehead stroking he'll fall asleep in loaf pose. But he'll also chew on your shoes --while you're still wearing them-- and scale the walls to find you if he can hear you near by.

He's barely 2 pounds of pure love and destruction.
 

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chofamily

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Also...and again, this is purely anecdotal, but dewarf bunnies, especially young ones, have been some of the most destructive little monsters I've ever had the pleasure of meeting. There rescue I volunteer with currently has one that climbs up his expen. Climbs!

He's the friendliest little guy and man does he love people. With enough forehead stroking he'll fall asleep in loaf pose. But he'll also chew on your shoes --while you're still wearing them-- and scale the walls to find you if he can hear you near by.

He's barely 2 pounds of pure love and destruction.
This sounds about right. Popper will chew on my slides I just wear when inside the bunny pen enclosure.
what do you do (or have) to keep your dwarf bunny busy?

I’ve already stacked 5 sheets of cardboard to prevent digging destruction to my carpet.
 

DelawareRunner

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My five year old girl (avatar pic) is a dwarf, and as others stated--they tend to be destructive. She was a rescue from a bunny hoarding case when she was a few months old. She was less than a year and spayed when I adopted her, but the rabbit rescue told me she was the most destructive bunny they ever had. She would chew the foam floor in their x pen. She's actually doing that in this avatar picture which was taken by the rescue! Her x pen here has a cardboard floor with untreated wood underneath because she does not like a hard/slippery surface. She chews on the cardboard but doesn't ingest it. I have also put hay mats (Small Pet Select and Oxbow has them) on top of the cardboard in high chew areas to give her something other than cardboard to chew. She likes those! She get a lot of interaction, supervised free roam time in a bunny proof room, and all kinds of chew toys but that little girl just chews everything!
 

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