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Who has rescue rabbits?

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Blue eyes

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Almost all of my rabbits were from rescues. The great thing people often don't realize is that rabbits from rescues are almost all vet-checked. They get fixed after being brought to the rescue so they get good care.

I think there is a fear among some people that rescued rabbits have something wrong with them. But many rabbits that end up in shelters are there because of buyers remorse -_- people thought a rabbit would be a glorified snuggly hamster that is content to sit in a cage all day. And/ or they didn't realize that hormones can cause problems and they have no intention of spending vet fees to have a rabbit fixed.

As for parasites or maladies, I've never seen a rescue adopt out a rabbit with any parasite (not knowingly) and the rare instance where a rabbit has a physical condition, the rescue is upfront and states that this rabbit needs extra care (and usually reserves them for experienced rabbit owners).

For histories of rescues I've had... one, so said the rescue, came from a woman who had pet rabbits but she had to go to a shelter to escape an abusive husband. No pets allowed at the women's shelter.

Another came from a hoarding situation. Another pair came from a rescue that takes in rabbits being sold far too young. They hand rear them. Apparently they helped change laws in their area to prevent such early sale of rabbits.

The others I don't know their histories. Never thought to ask at the time.

Just thought of another 'history.' Rescues often get pregnant rabbits that people abandon. The rescues raise them and, once fixed, adopt them out. I believe I have had one from that situation years back.
 
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Alyssa and Bugs♡

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My bun didn't come from a rescue. However, his companion we are looking into getting will come from a rescue. The only issue I'm facing with the rescue route is my age. Because I'm 14, I can't be the primary caretaker (said the rescue). I get that though. Most kids my age can't properly meets a rabbit's needs. Rabbits in rescues just need a second chance and it's our job to make sure they get that.
 

Hermelin

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None of my rabbits come from a rescue but two of my bunnies are rehomed.

One I bought for a symbolic sum, he cost 10 $ and was neutered, veterinarian checked and got all his things.

The other rabbit I got for free, but both of my rabbits was searching for a new home.

One of them was really thin, had problem with one eye and dirty ears. I could also feel all her ribs and the spine was really sharp.

The other rabbit was a biter, that always attacked people and a really skittish fellow.

My country have very few rabbit rescues but so it’s not common.

Most of the time breeders take rabbits that need new homes and rehome them to new family’s.

But most rescue for rabbits are neutered/spayed , gotten veterinarian checked, chipped and vaccinated before they get new homes :)
 

irishgal@heart3

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Curious how many guardians have rescue buns? History/backgrounds? Ages now since you rescued? Were DVM trips needed upon intake due to parasites, maladies, et al?
One of my buns, Peter is from a rescue, he is a brown and white mini rex. He is 9 months and was neutered by the rescue. My other bunny a female, I bought from a breeder, she is a lionhead/hot tot mix and I spayed her at six months. The baby I have now is 8 weeks old, blackjack is his name, and is a all black mini-rex with a white snipet on his nose and blue eyes. He will be neutered at 5 or 6 months. So far other then spays and neuters, I had Peter my mini-rex to the vet a month ago, and he developed mites in his ears although the vet didn't see any. He had sores in his ear. So I treated him and his sister for mites. I didn't have the baby then. I quarantined the baby for a month and now his is in my Florida room in his own area with the others. All my rabbits regardless of where they came from, were clean and healthy and pretty friendly. They are wonderful and friendly now and come running when I feed them and take care of them and play with them. Love all my buns.
 

Imbrium

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Did you mean rescue bunns like "I found a rabbit on the side of the road" or rescue as in from a shelter? If the latter, I've *never* seen a sick rabbit at the Houston shelters.

I got my first two rabbits from a breeder because I was impatient and couldn't find a local shelter that adopted out rabbits (in San Antonio, no less... there was a rabbit rescue, but they no longer adopted out rabbits because of jerks who kept returning them). When the girls were less than a year old, we moved to Houston to be with my hubby, who eventually talked me into a third rabbit (and then some, heh). All five I've gotten with hubby (three of whom we still have) came from shelters in Houston or Katy (just outside Houston) and they've all been happy, healthy little bunns.

Because I'm 14, I can't be the primary caretaker (said the rescue). I get that though. Most kids my age can't properly meets a rabbit's needs. Rabbits in rescues just need a second chance and it's our job to make sure they get that.
You're 14?? Wow. I thought you were more like 16, at least (and only that young because I'm pretty sure I've seen context clues indicating you lived with parent(s) and/or were in school, etc.). Reminds me of myself, hehe... I always sounded like a miniature adult even when I was younger and was always very mature for my age.

It's probably not just about assuming kids might not be mature enough to commit to a pet. Minors (esp. under 16) often don't have jobs and are therefore unable to financially provide for a pet without a guardian's help (sure, allowance can buy food, but what about vet bills?), plus (and possibly most importantly) they almost always live under someone else's roof and no one at the shelter wants to get yelled at by your parents if it turns out they said no to a pet and you brought one home anyway :p. I mean, that's just excess drama and paperwork that some poor volunteer would have to deal with.

Blame the kids who screw up, they ruin it for everyone. These rules wouldn't exist if someone hadn't done something to make them necessary.
 

Alyssa and Bugs♡

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In Iowa, people under 16 can't work more than 16 hours in a week. I make minimum wage and usually work 5-15 hours a week. If I only work 5 hours that week, I will only bring home only $30 after the government takes money out. I always make sure Bugs has whatever he may need before I even consider buying anything for myself. The last time Bugs had to go to the vet, I didn't have the money to pay for it as it was before I started my job. My parents paid the whole $100 it cost us. Now, I put $30 into a jar that is saved for any emergency he may have.

My mom is going to contact the rescue to tell them that she's okay with getting another rabbit and that I'm the primary caretaker. I hope they're open to making exceptions.
 

Imbrium

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In TX, I think you need some sort of hardship to be able to work under 16, or at least that was the case when I was that age (19 years ago, lol)... when I turned 16, my mom got me a cheap car and I got myself an after school/weekends job.

If your mom has a good reason for not being able to accompany you to the shelter, I would hope they'd be open to bending the rules. Good luck getting a new bunny! :)
 

Anna R.

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I have a rabbit from a rescue. I rescued her a year ago, almost to the day. She was a year old when I got her, so now she is 2. She was all checked out and spayed (she is a female) when I got her. She is a mini Rex/Rex mix and her name is Alice. She is so sweet; but, she does not liked to be picked up. Which is OK, I can live with that. She came from a breeder who was going to give her up for meat as her markings are off (she is a broken black and the marking on her nose is off to the side). They decided she had such a great personality that they didn't want to give her for meat so gave her to the rescue. She is so full of personality so I can see why they thought so. I am glad they didn't give her meat, she is so funny and so full of energy. She binkys all the time and makes me laugh so hard sometimes. She is so silly. I love my rescue and would rescue another if I was looking to get another bun. I just love her, she is the light of my life. I greatly thank the rescue for saving her.
 

Orrin

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Our first two domestic rabbits came from a Humane Society Shelter. The were 8-month does, sweet and lovable. A few months later we got an intact 8-week old buck from an "oops" litter, supposedly Flemish giant.

We kept the does and the buck in separate pens in our basement; however, at the onset of puberty the buck broke out of his pen and broke into the does' quarters. As it turned out one of the does wasn't spayed, after all. Nine kits showed up in a few weeks.

We kept three of the kits and the shelter took six. Two of the three live upstairs with us and they are the joy of our lives. The buck, now neutered, turned out to be only a half-breed Flemish. That's fine. We love them all. We now have three bonded pairs. The basement rabbits take turns grazing in our lawn. It is a thrill to see how much they enjoy it.

They are mixed breed; but, to us they are beautiful and mean the world to us. If we ever need another rabbit we'll take a shelter rescue.
 

RoseCottageBuns

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All my buns are rescued . They are part of the family. If I can I shall take more as I have more time these days. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing a happy rescued bun binkying around on the lawn! Everyone should rescue if they can.
 

badwolf12345

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I had a feral rabbit my brother rescued, i got him a about 5+ years ago when we got him home my brother accidentally dropped him and had to recatch him. We didnt get anything done to him but i was young then so he slept in my room next to me and i had a Halloween bucket that he used like a burrow. I also made box castles for him that he loved to chew.
 

mabegiru

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My bunny Ripley is a rescue bunny. She's 3 and we got her when she was one. She is very feisty as she had to fend for herself for a couple of months out in the streets before getting rescued. Here in the UK rescue bunnies get neutered and fully vaccinated before going to their forever home but a donation is expected from the new parent like £25 in our case so the charity gets some of the expenses covered. Our bunny is mostly an indoor free roaming rabbit after we rabbit proofed our lounge. She loves playing with and shredding cardboard boxes and is my twin daughters best friend.
 

Jenny Durling

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Natasha is a rescue. She was 8 months old and spayed when we brought her home. I don’t know Rocky’s origin. To me he’s a “rescue” as he had belonged to a family with 2 little girls for three years before they got tired of him. When we got him, his nails were so long they actually curled out to the sides! He lived in a hutch in the driveway. He’s now free roaming and has a bonded buddy. I’d call that a rescue!
 
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