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Which pellets should I buy for my rabbit ( 1 y.o )

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BunnyLuv27

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6A745B70-1072-46F8-9583-FC16326EEE3C.png 318BD660-ED3B-427B-90CA-7B0CEFC6E2DA.jpeg I’ve been feeding my rabbit pellets Katee forti diet and I’ve recently found this type of pellets on amazon. What do you guys think? Should I keep feeding my rabbit the same pellets that I buy from petco or this one from amazon?
 

Bucktooth

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I'm not sure, I feed the oxbow ones and my bunnies really like those. If you do switch make sure to mix the food gradually.
 

JBun

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They are actually pretty similar in composition. I don't much care for the colorful bits being in the forti diet, but as long as your rabbit is eating all of the pellets and not just picking out the colorful bits it shouldn't be an issue. The timothy complete is fine as well. So it's just your preference on what you want to feed, either type is considered fine for an adult pet rabbit(non breeding) based on the usual pet rabbit recommendations for pellets.

Like bucktooth said, if you do switch to the other kind, it should be done gradually over a couple weeks starting to add a little of the new while decreasing the old, and gradually increasing new/decreasing old each day until at the end of 2-3 weeks you have completely switched over.
 

VioletRose

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I use Oxbow as well. It seems the healthiest option out there. So many unecessary and unhealthy additives in many pellets, like corn, way to many sweeteners (very bad for gut health) and weird unidentifiable bits. For my adult bunny I get the adult rabbit pellets, which are mostly composed of timothy hay, from ebay.
 

SableSteel

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I don't like the Kaytee pellets, especially the one with things mixed into it. I feed Purina myself (I feed one of their diets that does have corn, and my rabbits do well on it, but if that's an issue for you they have other versions that don't have corn), I've also heard good things about MannaPro, Blue Seal and PenPals feed. I don't like Oxbow either (but I do like them more than kaytee). WAY overpriced for pellets that aren't super great, imo (in comparison, purina is about $20 for a 50 lb bag). Low protein and energy so they'd really only work as a partial diet, and for low-energy use rabbits (spayed, older). If you don't mind the money and your rabbit does well on them, go ahead, but I wouldn't ever feed it. What food is best (Especially what protein %) varies depending on your rabbit. Neutered/spayed house rabbits are usually okay with 14-16%. Non-breeding intact rabbits 15-17%. Breeding rabbits 16-18%. Any breed with wool I wouldn't go anything less than 18%, they need a lot of protein for developing all that fur. A lot of people say not to use alfalfa based feed, but as long as you are not supplementing other high-calcium stuff into their diet (eg alfalfa) and your rabbit isn't predisposed to calcium buildup it's okay. Alfalfa is a higher protein/energy hay that often forms the base of complete diet pellets. My rule of thumb: if your rabbit has loose, or wet stool you might want to look into a lower protein/higher fiber diet. If your rabbit has large, dry stools you might want to look into a higher protein diet. There's no one right way to feed a rabbit, and each rabbit is different. Even within my Himalayans, rabbits of the same age, breed and sex can have different feed requirements

Whatever you do feed, make sure you change it out gradually, and provide hay as a supplement during food transition.
 

Blue eyes

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^ I looked at the Modesto Milling nutrition analysis. The fiber % is good but the protein is rather high at 17%. For fixed indoor rabbits, the recommendations are to keep closer to 12% (no more than 14%). It is too rich for indoor fixed rabbits.

It was probably made for breeding rabbits. They need higher protein . Nice that it is organic. Looks like a good option for breeders.
 

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