Viral Link to GI Stasis (pseudo intestinal obstruction)

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pamnock

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http://www.tours.inra.fr/urbase/internet/resultats/enterocolite/nieddu.htm
The study identified a number of viruses in 37% of the cases of mucoid enteropathy cecal impactation. These viruses included "Rotaviruses (41.9% of positives) were the most frequently diagnosed viral agents, followed by coronavirus-like viruses (25.6%),
parvoviruses (21.1%) and enterovirus-like viruses (10.3%). A limited number of samples resulted positive for other viruses like adenovirus (2 cases = 0.7%), calicivirus and reovirus (1 case each = 0.2%). In most cases of multiple infections (Table 2) coronavirus-like particles (17 cases), rotavirus and parvovirus (15 cases each) were
mainly involved. In particular, the most frequent association was rotavirus together with parvovirus (7 cases)."




Pam





Rotavirus

 

pamnock

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There are many other possible factors in GI stasis:

Illness, stress, medication, metabolic disorder or parasitic infection may also precede GI stasis.
In some cases, there may also be a genetic predisposition (especially in certain breeds such as Dwarf Hotots).
Ingestion of certain materials (such as nylon carpet fibers) can lead to GI stasis.
High fat diets may also affect gut motility.
Heard of a case of GI stasis this week in which the rabbit had intestinal cancer.

Although a low fiber diet is often blamed for GI stasis, a high fiber diet will not prevent it.

Pam
 

RaspberrySwirl

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So, if I understand correctly, GI Stasis, is a result of something, rather than"the something"?

To put in terms easier for me to grasp and maybe others not as scientifically educated as yourself;Would it be kind of like GI Stasis being constipation that is deadly to the rabbit, and the above mentioned viruses are some of the reasons the rabbit gets the constipation?

I always thought GI Stasis was an actual "thing". You know like people get chicken pox or measles...Now, I think I'm starting to understand.Maybe...

Raspberry
 

pamnock

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RaspberrySwirl wrote:
To put in terms easier for me to grasp and maybe others not as scientifically educated as yourself;

I have to show that comment to my kids -- they'll get a kick out of it! My daughter says I'm seriously ADDs and need to be on medication so that I would, at the very least, be able to finish a sentence:?

Anyhow, GI stasis can have many causes.

Here's a good link . ..

http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/ileus.html



Pam
 

slavetoabunny

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Here is some info written by a vet in response to a question on stasis on another rabbit board:

Is a very common misconception among many veterinarians that"stasis" is a diagnosis. Stasis is a clinical sign of another problem.Just like anemia is not a disease but an effect from disease. Some examples of things causing stasis in rabbits: chronic kidney failure, clostridial infections, inappropriate diet, liver infections,parasites like coccidia, and many many more.

The reason it is important to make the distinction is veterinarians can direct treatment toward the underlying problem and properly educate clients - result=better care for bunnies.

It sounds to me that the stress of flying had altered the cecal bacterial flora. Likely result-clostridial infection. Your veterinarian probably gave fluids either in the office and/or you gave them at home(many use juices or critical care) and a medication to take home. All things that get the bunnies through the crisis until they get better on their own.

Where the problem comes in is if there is some long standing disease (liver,kidney,cancer)- the bunny will get temporarily better and then start to decline again. Now precious time has been wasted on a problem that may have originally been simple and now has become complicated.




 

pamnock

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slavetoabunny wrote:
Stasis is a clinical sign of another problem.

Excellent info and statement. :thanks:



I had mentioned earlier in this thread of a case where a lady lost her rabbit to "GI stasis". A necropsy revealed intestinal cancer.

Pam
 

shadow10978

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Thanks Pam, it cleared up a lot of questions that I had about GL Stasis. I just didn't realize what all contributed to it. This is definitely a link for the bunny folder and one for the bunny binder as well.
 

Thank You Pam ,

What a great article , BUT I have to say it has raised a question I have and have had about Diets and Rabbits .

this quote :

"Like those of most herbivores, the stomach and intestines of a healthy rabbit are never empty. A rabbit may eat relatively normal amounts of food, almost up to the time the GI tract shuts down. "

I know some people put their rabbits on a weight reduction diet , Where as the stomach and intestines are alwaysworking , how does it make sense to limit a 'intake of food , possibly risking a slowdown and possible stasis ? Not everyone would think to push hay and other grassesfor the rabbit to eat, therein keeping the stomach and intestines moving .

Any thoughts on this part of the subject ?
 

pamnock

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gypsy wrote:
I know some people put their rabbits on a weight reduction diet , Where as the stomach and intestines are alwaysworking , how does it make sense to limit a rabbits intake of food , possibly risking a slowdown and possible stasis ? Not everyone would think to push hay and other grassesfor the rabbit to eat, there in keeping the stomach and intestines moving .

Any thoughts on this part of the subject ?

While I do agree with the theory that the rabbit should always have access to smallhay throughout the day, I found that we have no more (or less) cases of GI related illness since we switched to a limited once-a-day no hayfeeding for the rabbits.

I was also surprised that there has beenabsolutely no change in their overall condition.

It would appear that the rabbits seem to adjust fine to limited feedings.

Pam
 

Thanks Pam .

Could the reason have any thing to do with the Quality of Feed , keeping inmind some Feed has higher fiber content with less fat , almost eliminating the absolute necessity of feeding additional haysand grasses ?
 

pamnock

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Commercial rabbit pellets are formulated as the "ideal" nutritionally balanced feed. Optimal growth is obtained at 15% fiber. Lower fiber may result in enteritis.Fiber constituting over 20% of the diet may also result in intestinal problems and nutritional imbalance."High-fiber diets (>20% crude fiber) may result in an increased incidence of cecal impaction and mucoid enteritis. " --source Merck Veterinary manual.

Personally, I did not see decreased incidence of mucoid enteropathy in young rabbits when fed hay. However, I do believe that it may be beneficial to feed young growing kits (especially in certain breeds) small amounts of hay for proper teeth wear.

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/182600.htm

Because the nutritional requirements of older pet rabbits differ,moderate amounts of hay can be offered in conjunction with a balanced diet of dark leafy greens, vegetables and a small amount of pellets.

Pam
 

naturestee

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An important *bump!*

I am seeing in my own little herd a case of an infectious disease,either bacterial or viral, causing stasis. Just last week, Mocha had stasis which my vet determined to be from a bacterial cause because of excess fluids in her intestines and no other root causes. It could have just as easily been viral- it's impossible to tell. Last weekend, Loki was ill with similar symptoms, though he recovered faster and with only a little extra TLC. He never completely stopped eating. Sprite was ill last night, but like Loki she recovered quickly and did not completely stop eating. Like Mocha, their initial symptoms went hand-in-hand with normal poops that probably only stopped/slowed down because they were eating less. They also had cold ears,were less active, and were hunched in pain.

What I think is happening is that my bunnies contracted a cold/flu type virus, possibly a stomach/intestinal bug, that made them feel bad and showed as the symptom of GI stasis. This particular bug is short-lived. Mocha's temporary ailment became a dangerous concern because unlike the other two, she did not regain her appetite. She has always been a diva- if she's upset then the whole world has to stop. She acted similar when she was spayed. But it does show how a relatively minor illness can become a big problem in some rabbits.

I hope none of you have to deal with this. Three of my four have been ill in the last week, and Fey may still get sick yet...

And remember, GI stasis is a symptom, not a cause!
 

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