To Neuter or To Not Neuter??

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Jennyrobson

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Hey guys, an update on Moony. He’s doing great, very happy with the new hutch, having a run around in the space we’ve currently got for him. Its a bit like a free roam right now of one room, (we’re getting a dog pen but deliveries are delayed due to COVID in my area). However, when I sit with him, or just sit in a neutral space, he gives a little nibble. Is that normal? I’ve heard it could be because he’s not neutered or that he wants something or attention, that it’s not always got aggressive reasons behind it. He flops down when I’m near him and he’ll let me pet him etc so I don’t think he’s uncomfortable around me. What could it be?
 

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Jennyrobson

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That’s exactly what he does! He nudges my hand with his nose, sniffs around and then nibbles once but I do feel it every time. Is he trying to be friendly or is be unhappy with something?
 
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Hi,
In a few weeks I will be collecting a Mini Lop and I am hoping that when the genders are revealed, that I will be getting a male. If I get a male, will he need to be neutered? He will be an only rabbit. If the gender is female I will be getting her spayed but I really am hoping for a male. Any advice is welcome, thanks.
I would recommend neutering a male bunny. They can show signs of aggression and dominance if you don’t. This can lead to marking their territory and that can be a hard habit to break. Also leaving trails of poops around. I know it is also better for their health as well and can increase their lifespan.
 
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Jennyrobson

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I would recommend neutering a male bunny. They can show signs of aggression and dominance if you don’t. This can lead to marking their territory and that can be a hard habit to break. Also leaving trails of poops around. I know it is also better for their health as well and can increase their lifespan.

I created a bunnies tips and tricks group called Buns, Bunnos and Wabbits Facebook! I would consider myself very knowledgeable about bunnies. I have done a ton of research and I have taken courses. This group will be answering any posted questions, hot topics, or tips! Feel free to join if interested!
www.facebook.com/groups/bunsbunnosandwabbits/
Hi, I’ve already contacted a vet regarding him being neutered, it’ll definitely be done but I just wondered why he was giving little nibbles now. He doesn’t do them a lot, just sometimes. He flops and binkys etc so he is happy, I hope. I’ve been told that he can be neutered at 4-5 months of age, 4 being the earliest and 6 being the latest (ideally). I will look into registering him soon but due to the pandemic, we’re unable to at the minute as the vets would need to see him for him to be registered, which, unless I have a health concern, isn’t essential. Thank you for your comment!
 
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Hi, I’ve already contacted a vet regarding him being neutered, it’ll definitely be done but I just wondered why he was giving little nibbles now. He doesn’t do them a lot, just sometimes. He flops and binkys etc so he is happy, I hope. I’ve been told that he can be neutered at 4-5 months of age, 4 being the earliest and 6 being the latest (ideally). I will look into registering him soon but due to the pandemic, we’re unable to at the minute as the vets would need to see him for him to be registered, which, unless I have a health concern, isn’t essential. Thank you for your comment!
Yeah it’s so hard right now scheduling appointments...... I hope you can get one at the right time! He sounds like a happy bunny to me!
 

TreasuredFriend

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Here's an article I transferred from a Rescue about spay, also applies to spay/neuter.

East Coast Rabbit Rescue

February 19 at 1:10 PM ·

Warning graphic image!
As you may recall approximately 63 rabbits and 177 guinea pigs were recently rescued from a hoarder. Our thanks to Dylan who learned about this terrible situation and set in motion the rescue. If these poor animals were forced to live in that hell for another week or so, many of them would have not survived.

As it was, many of the rescued rabbits and guinea pigs had severe medical conditions including mites, syphilis, abscess and cancer. One female rabbit had a huge lump around her nipples (see attached pictures). While we had hoped that the lump was an abscess, unfortunately the biopsy result came back and the lump was identified as a malignant tumor.

Mammary carcinoma in rabbits is often concurrently associated with uterine adenocarcinoma. This type of tumor is one of the most common forms of cancer in rabbits, occurring in up to 60% percent of female rabbits over 3-4 years old.

Unneutered male rabbits may develop testicular cancer as young as 2-3 years old.

As a rabbit lover, we want to emphasize the importance of spaying and neutering your rabbit. First and foremost, it will prevent pregnancy. Every single day thousands of unwanted rabbits are killed in shelters, and an untold number of rabbits are dumped on the street and eventually killed by cars or predators. This needless suffering could be easily reduced by spaying or neutering your pet. Secondarily, a spayed/neutered rabbit will generally live a longer and healthier life. The risk of cancer and urinary tract infections are greatly reduced. Third, a fixed rabbit will be calmer, easier to litter box train and their destructive habits will tend to diminish. In addition, spayed/neutered rabbits are easier to bond because they are calmer.
Despite the significant benefits of sterilizing your rabbit, some people have expressed their concerns about the expense and safety of the procedure. Nowadays, neutering/spaying rabbits has become a safe procedure IF performed by veterinarian who has experience with rabbits. Of course there is a small risk to surgery, but generally speaking the mortality risk due to anesthesia runs around 1%. Thus the best thing to do is contact a rabbit rescue to get referrals concerning qualified/low cost Vets to use. By using such Vets the procedure will be safer and generally much less expensive.

In conclusion, we highly recommend spaying and neutering your rabbit. Intuitively doing the right thing initially will make your rabbit experience a better one. It will also save you money in the long run and it will ultimately prolong the health and life of your pet.
 

Jennyrobson

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Hi guys, Moony is doing great... but I’ve noticed that a few of his poops are smaller than the others. He is still drinking and eating, as well as hopping around and interacting as normal. The first picture is a picture of his poops from earlier today, the second is his poops right now and the last two are what I feed him
 

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Diane R

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Hi guys, Moony is doing great... but I’ve noticed that a few of his poops are smaller than the others. He is still drinking and eating, as well as hopping around and interacting as normal. The first picture is a picture of his poops from earlier today, the second is his poops right now and the last two are what I feed him
Poop looks very good, don't worry.
 

LadyGrey

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Intact bucks are musky smelling, that's the only reason you need to fix them. It smells like pungent moldy coffee. People who own them get accustomed to the smell but people who come into your home will notice.
 

Jennyrobson

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Intact bucks are musky smelling, that's the only reason you need to fix them. It smells like pungent moldy coffee. People who own them get accustomed to the smell but people who come into your home will notice.
I don’t really notice a smell with Moony apart from the smell of his hay... I don’t want him to develop aggression as his hormones hit or become dominant, so I will be neutering him. Research and other people have also told me it prolongs the lifespan and I want him to be around for as long as possible. He will be neutered at around 5 months :)
 

TreasuredFriend

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Our unneutered males sprayed horrendously and were territorial wrt humping et al. So glad that Veterinary Medicine has progressed and allows the safe alteration (hormone calming procedure) of our beloved companions.

It was never fun getting sprayed by our males' jet hoses as they hopped around. I can detect obnoxious odors pretty well. Whether inside our home, or whether I sniff a skunk or other odor outdoors.

'Tis comforting you want to be around Moony for as long as possible. One of our Flemish Giant fosters was adopted to a responsible couple, and we still miss him to this day. He had a great personality and was so affectionate. But, he saturated and used his emission hose all the time prior to neuter with our rabbit-savvy DVM.
 

Jennyrobson

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Our unneutered males sprayed horrendously and were territorial wrt humping et al. So glad that Veterinary Medicine has progressed and allows the safe alteration (hormone calming procedure) of our beloved companions.

It was never fun getting sprayed by our males' jet hoses as they hopped around. I can detect obnoxious odors pretty well. Whether inside our home, or whether I sniff a skunk or other odor outdoors.

'Tis comforting you want to be around Moony for as long as possible. One of our Flemish Giant fosters was adopted to a responsible couple, and we still miss him to this day. He had a great personality and was so affectionate. But, he saturated and used his emission hose all the time prior to neuter with our rabbit-savvy DVM.
So far I haven’t noticed any spraying, just some pees in his litter tray and a few other pees around his area. Can’t wait for him to be neutered though as I’m sure litter training him in regard to his poops will become easier. But also, for the health benefits, obviously. Hoping for a long time with my bunny son :)
 

Jennyrobson

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Also guys, should I brush his feet? I heard that you’re meant to but he’s not very fluffy on his feet, at least I don’t think he is. I did try a little but he hates it, he was trying to get away which made me feel awful. The fur is slightly tangled, but not massively. He’s a mini lop x mini lion lop so not very very very fluffy I wouldn’t say. I don’t think he needs them brushed but I’m not an expert so. I brush the rest of him fine and he’s okay with that but I’m not sure about his feet. I really don’t want to try and brush them again as I’m afraid he’ll injure himself.
 
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