To Neuter or To Not Neuter??

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Jennyrobson

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Found this adult food now, I think it’s better.
 

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Jennyrobson

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I personally boycott Pets at Home. They sell factory farmed bunnies, they don't neuter, they don't vaccinate, awful. Their rabbit food is certainly not the best, they sell extremely unhealthy treats and you don't get the best hay in shops generally, much better quality if you buy online.
Also, only just seen this hence why I’m replying a bit later.
I’ve never bought a bunny from petsathome, the vets that is integrated with them is supposedly very good. These vets do vaccinate and neuter/spay as well as offer other treatments such as annual vaccinations, dental treatment and nail clipping to just mention a few. I will be looking around for some reputable websites I can order from after I have a chat about the best things to feed. I already have some brands of hay/pellets etc in mind from all the info you and everyone else has given me but I will chat with the vet to see what they recommend
 

cuteus

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In the us it costs 195 for me, which is the same as 166 euros.
Holy! where are you? I have been quoted $500 the lowest and over $1000 the highest! Those are rabbit savvy practices.
Of 3 male rabbits, I am neutering the last one (6yr +) and only because he developed a testicular tumor last year. They are rarely malignant but I will do it since no one can tell me if the tumor can be painful. He still plays with his beach ball, runs around the house and lays on his stomach. So, it does not seem to affect mobility much. Our first rabbit developed back problems and a neurogenic bladder, probably because of the back issues, so it was not that he was intact. The second, lived to be 12+ and was also intact. The current one, has the testicular tumor. The 2nd did spray when excited but the current one never has. I am not sure that the behaviors mentioned here are due to the testosterone as much as it is personality. The first bun humped our legs (but he was a breeder rescue and might be residual behavior also), the 2nd never humped us but he had a stuffed rabbit that he used for that. The current one, not interested in humping the toy or us, but if he catches the beach ball he is rolling around, he does hump that ball. Maybe you can wait and see what behaviors he exhibits that you can't live with.
I don't know why neutering is damned expensive where I live, NYC outskirts, but it is impossible for some to afford even $500! Good luck!
 

cuteus

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Found this adult food now, I think it’s better.
I would suggest to contact the food maker and ask what kind of grass, it is odd the way that is listed. In the US, they would not get away with just listing "grass". My buns have all been fed Timothy Complete from Kaytee. It is the only item I buy from that company as they have a lot of junk. When we first got bunnies, money was tight and the "best" food was double the price. Timothy Complete has a recipe that allowed my last bunny to live 12+ years. Of course he also had access to Orchard grass hay and greens. Vets don't recommend shots in the US. Never vaccinated my buns, vets never suggested them. They were all indoors, though. Each bun had a preference of items to chew that were no-no. If yours is let to roam, watch and see what he tends to sniff and chew. Remote control buttons, game controllers, electric wires, magazines, papers of all kinds, furniture, etc. Each of my bunnies liked remotes, but one liked electrical wires and the other did not. One liked regular paper, the other the glossy kind. Then, there is the surprise attack on items he used to ignore. So, don't trust they will continue a pattern, the sneaky things. It is amazing the things they chewed on and survived without incident. But, it is not worth the risk. I have 2 or 3 vet practices because, just like kids, they tend to get sick on holidays and weekends, having more than one, ensures someone will be available if you need an urgent appointment.
 

Jennyrobson

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I would suggest to contact the food maker and ask what kind of grass, it is odd the way that is listed. In the US, they would not get away with just listing "grass". My buns have all been fed Timothy Complete from Kaytee. It is the only item I buy from that company as they have a lot of junk. When we first got bunnies, money was tight and the "best" food was double the price. Timothy Complete has a recipe that allowed my last bunny to live 12+ years. Of course he also had access to Orchard grass hay and greens. Vets don't recommend shots in the US. Never vaccinated my buns, vets never suggested them. They were all indoors, though. Each bun had a preference of items to chew that were no-no. If yours is let to roam, watch and see what he tends to sniff and chew. Remote control buttons, game controllers, electric wires, magazines, papers of all kinds, furniture, etc. Each of my bunnies liked remotes, but one liked electrical wires and the other did not. One liked regular paper, the other the glossy kind. Then, there is the surprise attack on items he used to ignore. So, don't trust they will continue a pattern, the sneaky things. It is amazing the things they chewed on and survived without incident. But, it is not worth the risk. I have 2 or 3 vet practices because, just like kids, they tend to get sick on holidays and weekends, having more than one, ensures someone will be available if you need an urgent appointment.
I think that things are different in the UK. Mine will have access to hay and pellets and eventually greens. Vaccinations here are important for rabbits and I will be vaccinating my bunny, even though he will be an indoor bunny. I will also be neutering/spaying (not sure of gender yet but got into the routine of saying he) because I don’t want to take the risk of either gender getting cancer. Mine will be left to roam upstairs had I will remove all things that could be dangerous to him. The stairs will be blocked so that he is unable to fall down them. The vet that I am planning on registering them with has an emergency number so more than one vet won’t be necessary.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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It is always always a good idea to vaccinate your rabbit in the UK whether they live indoors or outdoors (just for reference in case anyone reads back on this). We have Myxo, RHD1 & 2 here, unlike in the US where a few cases have started to pop up here and there.


The stairs will be blocked so that he is unable to fall down them.
This is just an idea in case it’s something you’d like to do. My rabbit had learned to go up and down the stairs when they wanted to, and I’ve never had one fall down the stairs (I can imagine it varies per the rabbits personality). But yeah, they can go up and down haha. Kind of random 😅
 

Diane R

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It is always always a good idea to vaccinate your rabbit in the UK whether they live indoors or outdoors (just for reference in case anyone reads back on this). We have Myxo, RHD1 & 2 here, unlike in the US where a few cases have started to pop up here and there.



This is just an idea in case it’s something you’d like to do. My rabbit had learned to go up and down the stairs when they wanted to, and I’ve never had one fall down the stairs (I can imagine it varies per the rabbits personality). But yeah, they can go up and down haha. Kind of random 😅
I agree, going up and down stairs is good exercise but of course the stairs have to be safe and non-slippery.
 

Jennyrobson

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I agree, going up and down stairs is good exercise but of course the stairs have to be safe and non-slippery.
We have a sort of piece of carpet up the middle of ours so I’m unsure... not slippery but our stairs are in two parts, there’s one flight, then a landing area, then another flight... I don’t think I’ll be happy for them to go downstairs just to be safe. I’ll just carry them down there if they need to go down there for whatever reason as in to leave the house for a vet appointment.
 

Jennyrobson

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It is always always a good idea to vaccinate your rabbit in the UK whether they live indoors or outdoors (just for reference in case anyone reads back on this). We have Myxo, RHD1 & 2 here, unlike in the US where a few cases have started to pop up here and there.



This is just an idea in case it’s something you’d like to do. My rabbit had learned to go up and down the stairs when they wanted to, and I’ve never had one fall down the stairs (I can imagine it varies per the rabbits personality). But yeah, they can go up and down haha. Kind of random 😅
I will definitely be vaccinating and neutering/spaying because I did a bit of research myself. I have a back yard that will be fenced in this summer so they will be able to go there for exercise during the day. They will live indoors and will just have a few hours out there throughout the day, under supervision obviously. I may not let them go up and down the stairs as I am super paranoid and we have odd stairs but perhaps my mind will be changed when I actually have the rabbit.
 

Diane R

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We have a sort of piece of carpet up the middle of ours so I’m unsure... not slippery but our stairs are in two parts, there’s one flight, then a landing area, then another flight... I don’t think I’ll be happy for them to go downstairs just to be safe. I’ll just carry them down there if they need to go down there for whatever reason as in to leave the house for a vet appointment.
Stairs sound OK. But anyway not something to worry about right now. See how it goes. Most bunnies hate being carried.
 

Apollo’s Slave

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I will definitely be vaccinating and neutering/spaying because I did a bit of research myself. I have a back yard that will be fenced in this summer so they will be able to go there for exercise during the day. They will live indoors and will just have a few hours out there throughout the day, under supervision obviously. I may not let them go up and down the stairs as I am super paranoid and we have odd stairs but perhaps my mind will be changed when I actually have the rabbit.
Yep! Sounds like you’ve got a really good plan!
 

Jennyrobson

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Stairs sound OK. But anyway not something to worry about right now. See how it goes. Most bunnies hate being carried.
I meant with the pet carrier I’m looking at getting which will be for car journeys to the vet for example. The hutch will be upstairs so I can just pick them up when they’re near the hutch for me to put them back in it so they can have a bit of a nap. Do some like being carried? I read that mini lops are affectionate and cuddly but obviously that might be wrong and they may prefer to be left to themselves. The mother of the rabbits loves being on my friend’s lap 24/7 and will try to get into her bed to sleep as well. Are mini lops affectionate, usually?
EDIT - my friend has the babies on her lap often and they lay down to sleep on her, I can’t attach videos on this forum otherwise I would show the video I’ve seen of one of the babies sat on her lap and then curling up and going to sleep. I’ve included one picture somewhere above ^ of one of the babies sleeping on her. They seem quite cuddly right now. Will that change?
 
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KingBunny

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We have a sort of piece of carpet up the middle of ours so I’m unsure... not slippery but our stairs are in two parts, there’s one flight, then a landing area, then another flight... I don’t think I’ll be happy for them to go downstairs just to be safe. I’ll just carry them down there if they need to go down there for whatever reason as in to leave the house for a vet appointment.
Rabbits hate to be carried!
Mine actually really hopping up and down the stairs but I guess you don't want to take any unessesary risks. I really appreciate what you're doing for your future rabbit, it's good when people are responsible and take good care of their pets. There are a lot who don't.
 

Jennyrobson

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Rabbits hate to be carried!
Mine actually really hopping up and down the stairs but I guess you don't want to take any unessesary risks. I really appreciate what you're doing for your future rabbit, it's good when people are responsible and take good care of their pets. There are a lot who don't.
I was referring to a pet carrier, should have clarified that, sorry.
 

Diane R

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I meant with the pet carrier I’m looking at getting which will be for car journeys to the vet for example. The hutch will be upstairs so I can just pick them up when they’re near the hutch for me to put them back in it so they can have a bit of a nap. Do some like being carried? I read that mini lops are affectionate and cuddly but obviously that might be wrong and they may prefer to be left to themselves. The mother of the rabbits loves being on my friend’s lap 24/7 and will try to get into her bed to sleep as well. Are mini lops affectionate, usually?
EDIT - my friend has the babies on her lap often and they lay down to sleep on her, I can’t attach videos on this forum otherwise I would show the video I’ve seen of one of the babies sat on her lap and then curling up and going to sleep. I’ve included one picture somewhere above ^ of one of the babies sleeping on her. They seem quite cuddly right now. Will that change?
This is a very good carrier for bunnies: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Catit-Cabr...87&hvtargid=pla-575119185506&psc=1&th=1&psc=1 It's very rare for bunnies to enjoy being picked up. They all have their individual personalities, I don't think you can generalise in terms of breed. And their personalities change as they get older, you can't predict what a baby is going to be like when they hit puberty.
 

cuteus

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I meant with the pet carrier I’m looking at getting which will be for car journeys to the vet for example. The hutch will be upstairs so I can just pick them up when they’re near the hutch for me to put them back in it so they can have a bit of a nap. Do some like being carried? I read that mini lops are affectionate and cuddly but obviously that might be wrong and they may prefer to be left to themselves. The mother of the rabbits loves being on my friend’s lap 24/7 and will try to get into her bed to sleep as well. Are mini lops affectionate, usually?
EDIT - my friend has the babies on her lap often and they lay down to sleep on her, I can’t attach videos on this forum otherwise I would show the video I’ve seen of one of the babies sat on her lap and then curling up and going to sleep. I’ve included one picture somewhere above ^ of one of the babies sleeping on her. They seem quite cuddly right now. Will that change?
The reason they hate to be picked up is ingrained in their genes as that is how they get carried by a predator. They instinctively react to the lifting. Given that yours is getting a lot of socialization, maybe they won't mind as much. I had two mini lops and a mini rex. The minilops would enjoy long, long petting sessions, pressed their heads to the floor and go into a trance while getting petted. The mini rex, not the same, but could be that he was abandoned in the pine barrens and was traumatized. Our first mini lop would jump on my daughter's bed and stay with her petting him for "hours". Hopefully yours will be the cuddly kind. That first one would press and lean on my daughter, like bonded rabbits do. I would say that mini lops do seem more inclined to closeness with humans, but I only have the 3 for comparison.
As for the emergency number for vet care, almost all of them have emergency contact but will direct you to a 24 hr clinic for care. Just make sure that the emergency number is for your regular vet and not a redirection. One of the 3 vets have Sunday hours, so that is useful. When I needed an urgent appointment, I would find that 2 out 3 would still be a long wait for appt, while the 3rd was readily available. Always good to have a back up plan. Can't wait until your baby is home and see him interact!
 

Jennyrobson

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The reason they hate to be picked up is ingrained in their genes as that is how they get carried by a predator. They instinctively react to the lifting. Given that yours is getting a lot of socialization, maybe they won't mind as much. I had two mini lops and a mini rex. The minilops would enjoy long, long petting sessions, pressed their heads to the floor and go into a trance while getting petted. The mini rex, not the same, but could be that he was abandoned in the pine barrens and was traumatized. Our first mini lop would jump on my daughter's bed and stay with her petting him for "hours". Hopefully yours will be the cuddly kind. That first one would press and lean on my daughter, like bonded rabbits do. I would say that mini lops do seem more inclined to closeness with humans, but I only have the 3 for comparison.
As for the emergency number for vet care, almost all of them have emergency contact but will direct you to a 24 hr clinic for care. Just make sure that the emergency number is for your regular vet and not a redirection. One of the 3 vets have Sunday hours, so that is useful. When I needed an urgent appointment, I would find that 2 out 3 would still be a long wait for appt, while the 3rd was readily available. Always good to have a back up plan. Can't wait until your baby is home and see him interact!
They are being very well socialised so hopefully this will help with the carrying element, if not, completely fine as I will not carry them excessively. I will just do what they are happy with. Once litter trained, are they ok to be up on beds etc? Also, do mini lops bond with one specific person or with a number of people? I will be asking all of these questions in relation to 24hr care when I take my rabbit to the vet. I will be collecting the rabbit on the 20th of March, which is the start of spring according to google so I may even be able to take them that day, sort out the monthly pet plan and get them vaccinated either that day or the Monday. Also, are your buns microchipped? My plan offers microchipping for £10 but I don’t know if it’s really useful or...
 

Apollo’s Slave

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yeah, it’s fine for your rabbit to be on your bed once they’ve been trained. But it might take a few tries before they’re on your bed without weeing on it, even if they’ve been fixed and litter trained.

I think it depends on the personality of the rabbit, not the breed. But I do think rabbits can bond with more than one person. Apollo likes me and my mum but only one of my brothers.

My bunny has been microchipped. It’s not likely that your rabbit will get away, but it’s always a good option.
 

Jennyrobson

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yeah, it’s fine for your rabbit to be on your bed once they’ve been trained. But it might take a few tries before they’re on your bed without weeing on it, even if they’ve been fixed and litter trained.

I think it depends on the personality of the rabbit, not the breed. But I do think rabbits can bond with more than one person. Apollo likes me and my mum but only one of my brothers.

My bunny has been microchipped. It’s not likely that your rabbit will get away, but it’s always a good option.
I won’t mind if they do wee on my bed, I have an English bulldog (who won’t be near the rabbit as he sleeps in our kitchen) who we rescued from a puppy farm. He suffers with hydrocephalus and is also cryptorchid and even after we trained him to go outside, he’d always have the odd wee on his blankets so it’s not a problem at all, these things can be washed. I remember my first rabbit, unsure of the breed but he was gorgeous, his name was Jack. I will attach a picture here if possible, one of me and jack and one of my dog.
 

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