To Neuter or To Not Neuter??

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KingBunny

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Also, what does everyone feed their rabbits? As said above, I’m getting a mini lop and would love to know the best hay, pellets and greens to feed them. Thanks.
Are you from UK?
If so. Petsathome stock some good pellets and hay which is called Timothy hay.
A handful of lettuce or greens a day.
 

Mariam+Theo

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If you get a male, I still highly suggest neutering him. I didn't get Theo neutered at first, but he kept peeing outside of the litter box and it smelled awful. He was also humping everything and so aggressive towards me. Eventually, I called a vet and they said it would only be $50 instead of $300 (that is what my friend paid). After the neuter, he is the best rabbit I could hope for. He is so sweet, not aggressive, super well litter trained, and his litter box doesn't smell that bad anymore.

Diet:
Hay-I try to buy Timothy, Meadow, or Orchard hay bales from local farmers because the hay is super high quality (since it is for horses). It is also WAY cheaper than buying hay from pet stores for rabbits.
Pellets-I used to buy small pet select pellets, but I'm swapping Theo over to Sherwood because it is a better healthier brand.
Veggies-I buy a one 1lb box of spring mix and a bunch of cilantro, turnip greens, or mustard greens per week.


Since you are getting a baby rabbit, you will need to feed it Alfalfa-based pellets at the beginning. Once the rabbit hits 4 months, you will want to slowly swap over to a Timothy Pellet. I would feed a mini lop 1/4 cup of pellets per day, babies should not get unlimited pellets. I do not suggest feeding Alfalfa Hay, because once you have to swap over to Timothy Hay they won't eat the Timothy. Do not feed any fruits or veggies before the rabbit is 5 months. When it turns 5 months, add veggies super slowly so the rabbit doesn't get water poop.

Good Luck! Don't forget to send pictures of the new bunny!
 

Jennyrobson

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If you get a male, I still highly suggest neutering him. I didn't get Theo neutered at first, but he kept peeing outside of the litter box and it smelled awful. He was also humping everything and so aggressive towards me. Eventually, I called a vet and they said it would only be $50 instead of $300 (that is what my friend paid). After the neuter, he is the best rabbit I could hope for. He is so sweet, not aggressive, super well litter trained, and his litter box doesn't smell that bad anymore.

Diet:
Hay-I try to buy Timothy, Meadow, or Orchard hay bales from local farmers because the hay is super high quality (since it is for horses). It is also WAY cheaper than buying hay from pet stores for rabbits.
Pellets-I used to buy small pet select pellets, but I'm swapping Theo over to Sherwood because it is a better healthier brand.
Veggies-I buy a one 1lb box of spring mix and a bunch of cilantro, turnip greens, or mustard greens per week.


Since you are getting a baby rabbit, you will need to feed it Alfalfa-based pellets at the beginning. Once the rabbit hits 4 months, you will want to slowly swap over to a Timothy Pellet. I would feed a mini lop 1/4 cup of pellets per day, babies should not get unlimited pellets. I do not suggest feeding Alfalfa Hay, because once you have to swap over to Timothy Hay they won't eat the Timothy. Do not feed any fruits or veggies before the rabbit is 5 months. When it turns 5 months, add veggies super slowly so the rabbit doesn't get water poop.

Good Luck! Don't forget to send pictures of the new bunny!
This is one of them right now, I haven’t actually picked one as of yet as I’m waiting until I view them to base it off their personalities.
I will be contacting the vet tomorrow to ask when they can be vaccinated, how much that’ll cost, when they can be spayed/neutered and the cost of that too as well as the food they recommend. I just want to do everything right. I’ve decided I’ll definitely spay/neuter no matter what now. How much is $50 in UK £? I think it costs more to spay a doe than it does to neuter a buck.
Also, do you have any tips on aftercare at all? I’m new to the neutering and spaying side of things and I’ve never had a mini lop before. Thanks!
 

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Jennyrobson

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42 euros for me should be around £30... not too bad at all. I will pay any amount to ensure their health obviously but as the world of neutering and spaying rabbits is new to me I just wanted an idea of what it will cost. I’ve seen neutering being quoted at around £80 which is around 109 dollars, and I know that spaying a doe is more expensive than neutering a male, so I will just see what the vet says in the morning. I will care for that bunny so well, I absolutely love bunnies, probably more than I love dogs. I just want what is best for them in all aspects. Thank you for the compliment about the bunny :)
*Does anyone have any tips for aftercare for both doe and buck as I don’t know the gender yet
 

Madelyn L.

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Seeing as my bun got neutered two days ago, I can help you with the post spay/neuter stuff.
-keep everything pretty much the same. Too much change will be stressful
-make sure he/she eats veggies or hay soon (3-4) hours after surgery. This helps prevent a gut blockage.
- make sure they are warm. They will be kind of cold after the anesthesia. A blanket would do good
- prevent them from biting or scratching at the site. You don’t want it to become infected.
- give them their pain meds (if your vet gave them any) as prescribed
- make sure the don’t get too active. It could irritate the site.
- they are probably going to sleep a lot to wear off the anesthesia.
And here are just some things I worried about you may be worried about too:
- they shouldn’t be scared if you after the spay/neuter.
- they should start eating their food better a couple hours after the surgery.
- keep their home clean so the site doesn’t get infected
Hope everything goes well! ❤️
 

Mariam+Theo

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That's great that you have decided to spay\neuter! It is the best for the rabbit! Spaying is typically more money then neutering because of pain meds.
Follow @Madelyn L. advice with post care.
The only thing I would change is:
-make sure he/she eats veggies or hay soon (3-4) hours after surgery. This helps prevent a gut blockage
Hay, just hay. Some veggies are fine, but really push the hay!
 

Diane R

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Also, what does everyone feed their rabbits? As said above, I’m getting a mini lop and would love to know the best hay, pellets and greens to feed them. Thanks.
You're in the UK, right? There are several good online places for hay e.g. timothyhay.co.uk and hay and straw Hay and Straw Get at least 2-3 varieties of grass hay. This is what they should be eating for several hours a day. Put a handful of fresh hay out several times a day. They should always have piles of hay available. For pellets, keep bunny on the pellets they are used to for at least a couple of weeks. You can then transition to Science Selective or Burgess Excel, those are the most recommended pellets in the UK. Think of pellets as treats. Don't give more than 1 tbsp a day. Keep bunny on the same greens they are used to, if any. The best greens are fresh herbs. All fresh food has to be introduced in very small quantities e.g. just a few sprigs of parsley. Introduce one new food at a time and wait a couple of weeks before introducing another new food. Total fresh food eventually not more than the size of their head per day. No fruit, no carrot, no treats. If you're interested, there a couple of good UK rabbit FB groups: UK rabbit group and House Bunnies UK.
 

Diane R

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Thanks so much, I’ll look into them at our local pets at home :)
I personally boycott Pets at Home. They sell factory farmed bunnies, they don't neuter, they don't vaccinate, awful. Their rabbit food is certainly not the best, they sell extremely unhealthy treats and you don't get the best hay in shops generally, much better quality if you buy online.
 

Jennyrobson

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You're in the UK, right? There are several good online places for hay e.g. timothyhay.co.uk and hay and straw Hay and Straw Get at least 2-3 varieties of grass hay. This is what they should be eating for several hours a day. Put a handful of fresh hay out several times a day. They should always have piles of hay available. For pellets, keep bunny on the pellets they are used to for at least a couple of weeks. You can then transition to Science Selective or Burgess Excel, those are the most recommended pellets in the UK. Think of pellets as treats. Don't give more than 1 tbsp a day. Keep bunny on the same greens they are used to, if any. The best greens are fresh herbs. All fresh food has to be introduced in very small quantities e.g. just a few sprigs of parsley. Introduce one new food at a time and wait a couple of weeks before introducing another new food. Total fresh food eventually not more than the size of their head per day. No fruit, no carrot, no treats. If you're interested, there a couple of good UK rabbit FB groups: UK rabbit group and House Bunnies UK.
Yes, I am in the UK. I will be getting some food that they will be used to but I don’t know how much. I contacted the vet and they said it’s £75 for a neuter and £90 for a male and that they won’t need to be vaccinated until spring but when I register them, I can go to the shop below the vets as it’s an integrated vet and shop, and ask them about what food to get. I will ask them about Timothy Hay and what greens to feed them. The shop’s website sells Burgess Excel food so I will get that for them but everything else I will want clarification from. Thanks for the advice :)
 

Diane R

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Yes, I am in the UK. I will be getting some food that they will be used to but I don’t know how much. I contacted the vet and they said it’s £75 for a neuter and £90 for a male and that they won’t need to be vaccinated until spring but when I register them, I can go to the shop below the vets as it’s an integrated vet and shop, and ask them about what food to get. I will ask them about Timothy Hay and what greens to feed them. The shop’s website sells Burgess Excel food so I will get that for them but everything else I will want clarification from. Thanks for the advice :)
Please go to a vet on the RWAF vet list: Rabbit Friendly Vet List. Bunnies need vaccinating now, they can be vaccinated from 5 weeks. Waiting longer is taking unnecessary risks.
 

KingBunny

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Here's the food you want to get if you shop at petsathome.
I personally buy all my feed and hay from a farm feed store near me which means I can buy in bulk but petsathome stuff is generally pretty good.
20210208_162310.jpg 20210208_162254.jpg
 

Jennyrobson

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Please go to a vet on the RWAF vet list: Rabbit Friendly Vet List. Bunnies need vaccinating now, they can be vaccinated from 5 weeks. Waiting longer is taking unnecessary risks.
I was told they can be vaccinated from 5 weeks but that I shouldn’t take them out right now and that they’ll be vaccinated in spring. The lady I spoke to over the phone said that they will be safe at home in the hutch and around the house until they get vaccinated... I don’t know what to think of that advice now, I thought she was giving me good advice... she said the vets aren’t doing vaccinations until springtime...
 

KingBunny

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I was told they can be vaccinated from 5 weeks but that I shouldn’t take them out right now and that they’ll be vaccinated in spring. The lady I spoke to over the phone said that they will be safe at home in the hutch and around the house until they get vaccinated... I don’t know what to think of that advice now, I thought she was giving me good advice... she said the vets aren’t doing vaccinations until springtime...
Listen to the professionals.
They'll be ok for now.
 

Jennyrobson

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Listen to the professionals.
They'll be ok for now.
Are you sure? No other practices near me are registering new customers or their pets but this practice is and they told me that they will register my bunny when I have him. All I have to do is call and they’ll let me know if it’s safe to come into store to chat to the staff downstairs about food. She said that as long as I don’t take my bunny anywhere apart from around the house that they will be ok. Will my bunny be ok when I collect him? I’m getting paranoid now. I plan to vaccinate as soon as spring hits.
 

Jennyrobson

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Yes, I am in the UK. I will be getting some food that they will be used to but I don’t know how much. I contacted the vet and they said it’s £75 for a neuter and £90 for a female and that they won’t need to be vaccinated until spring but when I register them, I can go to the shop below the vets as it’s an integrated vet and shop, and ask them about what food to get. I will ask them about Timothy Hay and what greens to feed them. The shop’s website sells Burgess Excel food so I will get that for them but everything else I will want clarification from. Thanks for the advice :)
 

Mariam+Theo

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Here's the food you want to get if you shop at petsathome.
I personally buy all my feed and hay from a farm feed store near me which means I can buy in bulk but petsathome stuff is generally pretty good.
View attachment 52994 View attachment 52995
If you want your rabbit to live a very miserable 3 years (instead of 10-12 years) and then die because it is malnourished you would feed them this. I would be very scared to see the condition of your rabbits.

First off, the pellet is Alfafa based. Only baby rabbits should have Alfalfa hay. Adult rabbits should have Timothy-based pellets. The pellets are also HUGE! I would be scared of my rabbit choking on them. A high-quality rabbit pellet should have at least 18% fiber and at most 12% protein. That Pets At Home food has 12% protein, but only 17% fiber. The rabbit would get gi-stasis after eating that because rabbits need lots of fiber in their diet in order to keep their digestive tract moving.

Second, that hay is trash. I don't even know how the rabbit could eat that! It is so brown and gross. It isn't even strands of hay anymore, it is just dust. Rabbits should eat super green, fresh, long-stranded, not dusty hay (see picture below of high quality hay).
 

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Jennyrobson

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I just did some research and it says that the Myxomatosis vaccine should be given at least once a year and that it’s recommended that it be administered in early spring to protect in the summer when the biting flies are around. The lady told me there’s only one vaccine now combined of all vaccinations if that makes sense. This is the info I’ve just found and I’ll also attach an image of the pet care plan I am going with from the vet.
 

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TreasuredFriend

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We have sanctuary buns. All spayed/neutered. Elders, special needs, and house buns. While some sites suggest rabbits needs 2-4 cups of fresh greens & veggies ea/day, our companions get less than that. I just finished conversing with an adopter who's boy has bladder and kidney stones. SubQ treatment is being administered and one stone did flush out successfully. I compliment you for thinking ahead and preparing yourself for 10-12+ years of bun guardianship.

Our crew gets less than two cups of fresh greens/veggies each day and our oldest buns typically live 13 1/2 years. I wish longer, however disabilities, bone cancer, an enlarged liver tumor, general QOL (quality of life due to age) etc. have required a gentle PTS decison based on each companion's medical ailment. The youngsters born in our home rec'd Oxbow Essentials (alfalfa-base) for young rabbits.

I applaud Blue Eyes for giving links to her excellent website and mentioning why rescues & shelters get overloaded with unwanted buns or oops pregnancies when humans are clueless about puberty onset.
- I commend you for helping out a friend who took in an abandoned rabbit when she was pregnant. At one time we had 3 captured buns (off the street) and 16 new babies to get altered/find forever homes for. Someone dumped those 3 adults also, and the females weren't spayed. In shelter and rescue chapters, this happens more than you want to think about!!

I hope your friend will screen carefully so all babes find forever-homes, and hopefully get altered to prevent any further pregnancies.

Greens, pellets, hay: All our buns have rec'd Oxbow pellets throughout their lifetime. Getting the fruit-loop junk food stuff is not beneficial to longevity. I hope you can find reasonable hay bales or hay companies based on your postal code. A variety and selection of hay is helpful especially when you have a sick bun who's acting off, and fiber intake is important for keeping their incisors trim and optimal GI function.

Happy to learn you already are contacting Rabbit-savvy DVMs in your area!
 

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