Spring fever? Hormones? Bunny's suddenly super frisky

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overhear

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Hi All,

My bunny, who we took in last Halloween, has been settling in really nicely and getting much more relaxed around our family. But suddenly this week she's going berserk - she barely settles down to be petted and then jumps up and runs around in circles, grunting.

This is really new. Prior to this week she was very chill and pretty much just alternated between petting and naps.

She's not spayed. Could this be hormones???
 

overhear

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Still hoping for input from the bunny experts!

I'm wondering if I should look into spaying again because she's still going bonkers and is now starting to pee outside of her litter box. Spaying is very expensive here in the NYC area (~$700) and I was also worried about the risks of anesthesia.
 

Preitler

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It sure can be hormones. My girls till over the vegetable garden right now, one of the boys just sprayed me - yes, it's this time of the year. Well, one of those times.
 

Cinn-a-bun

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Check to see if there is a veterarian school. Ask them if they would fix your bunny for training students.
 

overhear

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Check to see if there is a veterarian school. Ask them if they would fix your bunny for training students.
I appreciate your suggestion, but I'd be very nervous about using an inexperienced vet for spaying as it seems that even with experienced vets some rabbits don't make it through. That said, maybe in vet schools the interns get extra supervision. It would be good to know how that process works and what kinds of outcomes they have compared to 'retail' vets.
 

SirLawrence

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I appreciate your suggestion, but I'd be very nervous about using an inexperienced vet for spaying as it seems that even with experienced vets some rabbits don't make it through. That said, maybe in vet schools the interns get extra supervision. It would be good to know how that process works and what kinds of outcomes they have compared to 'retail' vets.
Most of the risk is in the rabbit's response to the anesthesia, and not the skill of the vet. Not that it's not a factor. And students are supervised by professors, who are generally some of the best vets. You could ask if the professor would do the spay as an example?

Just saying it may be worth looking into. She's your girl, though, and I know you love her!

I originally didn't want to get Lawrence neutered because of the anesthesia risks, but after seeing the stress on his face for weeks being ravaged by hormones, I just couldn't let him live like that! Plus, with females, if left unspayed, they can develop uterine cancer.


"Unaltered female rabbits have an 80% chance of developing uterine or ovarian cancer between 2-5 years old. But this risk drops to almost zero as soon as your rabbit is spayed."
 

JBun

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Probably hormones. Spaying can help sometimes, but I've had spayed rabbits get obsessed with nest building in the spring too. Lasts for a few days where they can barely focus enough to eat because they are so intent on building a nest, then they snap out of it and are back to normal.
 
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