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Catlyn

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So i've been allowed to get a playmate for Storm once i've done enough research on what it means to have two bunnies instead of one.

Obviously it means double vet costs whenever they happen. Naturally, it means both spay and neuter are up for grabs by the vet. It means double hay and pellet consumance. Usually double cleanup too. I need to make another hidey-house and craft up a wood-type tunnel. Two buns bring along a work with bonding. It brings along joy once they're bonded.
It also means another "cage?" area for the new bun until bonded. And a neutral property.

1)But does it usually come with having double litterboxes, brushes, water dishes, food dishes and double toys as well?

2) i need to get more safe toys anyway but they're hard to find... have to make them myself. Any useful links or ideas?

3) i read that boy-girl bonds are the best so i was thinking of looking into a calm-demeanored girl.
3.1) but i also read that the rabbit's littermates and siblings can get along equally well. Is there a "better" option?
3.2) will it matter if the new rabbit is the same breed or is it up to their personalities?

4) We're in our cottage with Storm and once his neuter and new bun's spay is done and healed i want to bond them in our apartment where neither have been. But there's probably still late Musti's smell hanging around. Is it going to be a hindrance when i'm trying to bond them(in which case deep cleaning w vinegar is in order) or will it not affect them(in which case i'll just dust off the hay and his poops)?

5) if we get the new bun, i want her to be 5-6 mths or a bit older so that she could get a spay appoint straight away. Storm has turned 4mths old so he's technically old enough for his neuter but he hasn't had his "teens hormones" released yet. If he gets fixed before they appear, then will they never appear? Or is it better to wait until his hormones do pop out to fix him?

I've got quite a fat wallet of savings on my belt, so medical costs won't be a problem for a while.
 

OreoTheMiniLop

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1) Yes you should have 2 litterboxes incase they are terratorial over their space.
2) Small Pet Select is amazing toys. toys
3) I do not have answers for you.
4) You should do a deep clean before you bond them there because even though Musti is gone they will think it isn't a nuetral territory.
5) I do not have an answer for this either.
101 Rabbit has a great video on bonding if you haven't watched it yet.
 

Catlyn

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1) what about the other objects? Should i get a duplicate of those too?
 

Catlyn

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Oh baby stack cups are indeed a great idea! I've also been looking into puzzle mats for softer flooring since his hocks are already dry flaking. Means a haul to the baby shop! Musti was more destructive w cardboard so i hope that Storm isn't so i can make him tp tube toys!
 

OreoTheMiniLop

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double food dishes and water dishes is a maybe. some bunnies perfer to share with each other and others could care less. double toys is a no as long as you have lots to switch up. brushes is a no.
 

Blue eyes

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So i've been allowed to get a playmate for Storm once i've done enough research on what it means to have two bunnies instead of one.

Obviously it means double vet costs whenever they happen. Naturally, it means both spay and neuter are up for grabs by the vet. It means double hay and pellet consumance. Usually double cleanup too. I need to make another hidey-house and craft up a wood-type tunnel. Two buns bring along a work with bonding. It brings along joy once they're bonded.
It also means another "cage?" area for the new bun until bonded. And a neutral property.

1)But does it usually come with having double litterboxes, brushes, water dishes, food dishes and double toys as well?
Once they are bonded, they will typically share everything... bowls, litterboxes, etc.

2) i need to get more safe toys anyway but they're hard to find... have to make them myself. Any useful links or ideas?

3) i read that boy-girl bonds are the best so i was thinking of looking into a calm-demeanored girl.
3.1) but i also read that the rabbit's littermates and siblings can get along equally well. Is there a "better" option?
3.2) will it matter if the new rabbit is the same breed or is it up to their personalities?
Male/female pairs are considered easiest but it really depends on the individual temperament of each rabbit. F/F and M/M are quite common pairrings as well. Breed makes no difference whatsoever. Sibling can fight just as viciously as non-siblings. The critical factor is to have both fixed. Ideally, you would neuter your boy and (after he's healed) have him meet other fixed rabbits to pre-screen for potential compatibility. Though I don't know if that is an option in Estonia.

4) We're in our cottage with Storm and once his neuter and new bun's spay is done and healed i want to bond them in our apartment where neither have been. But there's probably still late Musti's smell hanging around. Is it going to be a hindrance when i'm trying to bond them(in which case deep cleaning w vinegar is in order) or will it not affect them(in which case i'll just dust off the hay and his poops)?
Always safest to wipe down with vinegar just to be sure.

5) if we get the new bun, i want her to be 5-6 mths or a bit older so that she could get a spay appoint straight away. Storm has turned 4mths old so he's technically old enough for his neuter but he hasn't had his "teens hormones" released yet. If he gets fixed before they appear, then will they never appear? Or is it better to wait until his hormones do pop out to fix him?
Best option is to fix him as soon as the vet is willing. The sooner the better. Bear in mind that it can take up to 6-8 weeks after the neuter for hormones to fully dissipate. No bonding should begin before then. Females can begin bonding around 4 weeks after surgery. So that may help you time things out.
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Catlyn

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Ideally, you would neuter your boy and (after he's healed) have him meet other fixed rabbits to pre-screen for potential compatibility. Though I don't know if that is an option in Estonia.

Sadly it is mostly not. 98% of the shelters in Estonia don't even house bunnies, there are mostly breeders around and sadly my dad isn't willing to drive 200km to the other side of the country just to collect an already fixed rabbit. Neither are the people selling the rabbits off to a better home. We've already contacted some potential ones and they said no. Well it all might depend on the person we're getting the second rabbit from, if they'd allow us to take a possible bondmate, fix&heal her and take her back if it doesn't work out but i highly doubt it. It wouldn't be financially good. The person selling them is obviously not wanting them back. Besides, if we get bun from a person that's not just selling one pet away, what is a breeder going to do with a fixed rabbit?
So our best bet is to get a rabbit that we think Storm might get along with(hence looking for a calmer one) and then fix and introduce her (probably at the same time as Storm) when both buns are healed and calmed from their ops. Because i am pretty sure that taking him on a screening even if he's fixed and the other one is not, will be a horrible idea.

Best option is to fix him as soon as the vet is willing. The sooner the better. Bear in mind that it can take up to 6-8 weeks after the neuter for hormones to fully dissipate. No bonding should begin before then. Females can begin bonding around 4 weeks after surgery. So that may help you time things out.

I was planning on first getting the new bun's essential setup ready, then get her, and immediately(up until a week after that) get an appointment to the vet to see when he'll be able to schedule to fix them both so while Storm is calming his hormones the other one can just heal. Getting the new bun will still take at least another week or so as dad and i have to go resource gathering to build the new bun a pen as well. I would've waited a month after their ops anyway but thanks for sharing the tips.

I really appreciate it.
 

Diane R

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Ideally, you would neuter your boy and (after he's healed) have him meet other fixed rabbits to pre-screen for potential compatibility. Though I don't know if that is an option in Estonia.

Sadly it is mostly not. 98% of the shelters in Estonia don't even house bunnies, there are mostly breeders around and sadly my dad isn't willing to drive 200km to the other side of the country just to collect an already fixed rabbit. Neither are the people selling the rabbits off to a better home. We've already contacted some potential ones and they said no. Well it all might depend on the person we're getting the second rabbit from, if they'd allow us to take a possible bondmate, fix&heal her and take her back if it doesn't work out but i highly doubt it. It wouldn't be financially good. The person selling them is obviously not wanting them back. Besides, if we get bun from a person that's not just selling one pet away, what is a breeder going to do with a fixed rabbit?
So our best bet is to get a rabbit that we think Storm might get along with(hence looking for a calmer one) and then fix and introduce her (probably at the same time as Storm) when both buns are healed and calmed from their ops. Because i am pretty sure that taking him on a screening even if he's fixed and the other one is not, will be a horrible idea.

Best option is to fix him as soon as the vet is willing. The sooner the better. Bear in mind that it can take up to 6-8 weeks after the neuter for hormones to fully dissipate. No bonding should begin before then. Females can begin bonding around 4 weeks after surgery. So that may help you time things out.

I was planning on first getting the new bun's essential setup ready, then get her, and immediately(up until a week after that) get an appointment to the vet to see when he'll be able to schedule to fix them both so while Storm is calming his hormones the other one can just heal. Getting the new bun will still take at least another week or so as dad and i have to go resource gathering to build the new bun a pen as well. I would've waited a month after their ops anyway but thanks for sharing the tips.

I really appreciate it.
Don't even consider getting another bunny (let alone a bunny who is not spayed) until 8 weeks after your boy is neutered. Then wait until 8 weeks after the new bunny is spayed before attempting to bond. I would keep them far away from each other until you are ready to bond.
 

Lauren Kiernan

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Oh baby stack cups are indeed a great idea! I've also been looking into puzzle mats for softer flooring since his hocks are already dry flaking. Means a haul to the baby shop! Musti was more destructive w cardboard so i hope that Storm isn't so i can make him tp tube toys!
We have them and Charlie loves when I sprinkle pellets in them. He flings them in an effort to get the treats. So cheap too.
 

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Catlyn

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Don't even consider getting another bunny (let alone a bunny who is not spayed) until 8 weeks after your boy is neutered. Then wait until 8 weeks after the new bunny is spayed before attempting to bond. I would keep them far away from each other until you are ready to bond.
That is WAY too much time apart even when being extremely cautious. 2 months for his nonexistent sex hormones to go away? I don't think so at all, rabbits are of course individuals but i believe that no rabbit takes that long to chill unless they're extremely horny...
And after that i'd need to wait another 2 months with the female? Sorry, i bear no ill will but we don't have that much time. We've got 2-3 months until we move again and by that time i need both buns home and healing so when we move neither can get territorial over their new space.

If you read carefully, you'd probably understand that as soon as i get the new bun, i'll keep her separated from Storm so that they can't mate or harm each other, but i want them to feel each others' existences instead. After i've gotten her i'll immediately call the vet to see when both can be fixed.
After they're fixed, i'll still keep them separated but close for at least a month (and maybe a couple weeks extra if needed) so that both psrties can heal and calm.
Only after both are nice and calm and fully recovered will i try moving (with) them to our other property, the new environment for both so they could peacefully initiate bonding.

I find no need to not get a bun before Storm is fixed and recovered. If they can't touch and harm each other it will be no problem.

Sorry if i offended you, that wasn't my intention. Just stating my opinion clearer and asking why you are opinionated as you are. So a question: what harm could two separated bunnies do when they're not fixed vs when they're fixed?
 

Diane R

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After neutering hormones will fluctuate for about 2 months. If you are moving I can see the sense in wanting both bunnies to move into neutral space when you move. That's not a bad idea. The reason I urge caution is because I have seen so many reports of accidental litters. Now that you've explained about the move, it seems that the best you can do is get both of them neutered ASAP and keep them separated until you move. Then bond in neutral territory. You say 'if they can't touch and harm each other it will be no problem'. Not necessarily. The presence of another bunny they are not bonded with can really stress them out especially when they are already dealing with hormone fluctuations post-neutering.
 

Cloverhouse

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Have you spoken to vets about the age a female needs to be to get spayed?

In the states they fix dogs and cats as young as 7 weeks. Seems like they could spay a female rabbit when relatively young.

For some reason many vets freak at the mention of the word rabbit, but years ago we had a wonderful vet and he spayed our two females at 12 weeks with no problem.

As long as the vet is rabbit savvy, what's the difference between doing it earlier rather than later? The operation is the same, they will open her up. I'd check on that.

I just had my boy neutered before he began to exhibit any typical male behaviors. Why wait until they develop bad habits?

A well bonded pair will usually be fine sharing everything.

Many people suggest taking the potential pair for a car ride in the same carrier, stress bonding. So if you can get everything taken care of before you head home, you could use that trip as part of the bonding process. I don't know what your time table looks like.
 

Catlyn

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After neutering hormones will fluctuate for about 2 months. If you are moving I can see the sense in wanting both bunnies to move into neutral space when you move. That's not a bad idea. The reason I urge caution is because I have seen so many reports of accidental litters. Now that you've explained about the move, it seems that the best you can do is get both of them neutered ASAP and keep them separated until you move. Then bond in neutral territory. You say 'if they can't touch and harm each other it will be no problem'. Not necessarily. The presence of another bunny they are not bonded with can really stress them out especially when they are already dealing with hormone fluctuations post-neutering.
Thank you for the reply! Now i understand the logic behind your reccommendations. And i would use them if it weren't for the migrating that we do each year(sort of on our own free will so that buns can have space and safe graze in warmer times)
I am sure that i can give separate rooms to the bunnies when they heal. I'll just have to deodorize the bed that Storm left a little mark on, block out the underside of the bed (and maybe get that extra one removed as it is useless unusable space), lift a single cord, block out the gap in the couch, get the bun's essential setup and then i'd be good to go. Storm would keep using the other room that we've already mostly bunno-proofed for him. These rooms share one wall but other than that they're not connected(have to make a full round' the house to get to either)
So i only have to hope that when i interact with both they don't get confused or irritated when i carry both their scents around at the same time. Should i change clothes when handling either?
Actually if an accidental litter were to happen, i'd be more than glad to safely help the mama grow her babies until they are 2mths old and then i'd give them to my aunt who is also waiting for bunny kits to come to her place.
Although considering my mum's recent behaviour and my own moral values i'd still make sure to wait long enough to ensure that an accident as such won't happen. It would be the best for all- us and more importantly the bunnies.
 

Catlyn

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Have you spoken to vets about the age a female needs to be to get spayed?

In the states they fix dogs and cats as young as 7 weeks. Seems
Many people suggest taking the potential pair for a car ride in the same carrier, stress bonding. So if you can get everything taken care of before you head home, you could use that trip as part of the bonding process. I don't know what your time table looks like.
In estonia most vets wait until bucks are 4mths (or when balls drop) and until does are 5-6 mths just in case.

Taking the potential mate to a car ride? Two unneuteref opposite sexed rabbits on a car ride? Really? I've read it works with fixed buns but mine isn't yet and neither are any of the breeders'. We don't have buns in shelters to take.
 

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In estonia most vets wait until bucks are 4mths (or when balls drop) and until does are 5-6 mths just in case.

Taking the potential mate to a car ride? Two unneuteref opposite sexed rabbits on a car ride? Really? I've read it works with fixed buns but mine isn't yet and neither are any of the breeders'. We don't have buns in shelters to take.
No, only with fixed buns. I don't understand why vets will spay cats that are 6 weeks old but not rabbits till much later.
 

Catlyn

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Probably because they need to be teenagers in order for the vet to do it. But then it wouldn't make sense as a year-old cat could still be called a youngster while a year-old rabbit is an adult. I have no idea.
 
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