Soft Stool

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by petkeeper, Feb 15, 2006.

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  1. Feb 15, 2006 #1

    petkeeper

    petkeeper

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    Hi guys as you know I have been having a major problem with Harley and soft stool. I finally found a good site that was informative and I thought I would share it with you incase anyone else is having this problem. I am taking all food away again except hay, for as long as it takes. I have to admit I was getting really frustrated but now I have a name and some information on how to hopefully make him better.

    Hope this helps!

    http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=670&S=5&SourceID=43

    S.
     
  2. Feb 15, 2006 #2

    RO STAFF 2

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    we'll move this to the infirmary, thanks. :)
     
  3. Feb 15, 2006 #3

    naturestee

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    Have you had fecal tests at the vets' yet? Some rabbits do have this caused by bacterial infections or parasites.

    I wouldn't recommend feeding only hay. They'll need to get their vitamins somehow. Try cutting back to a few tablespoons of pellets, just so your bun still gets vitamins and minerals. The article actually recommends cutting back to 1/4 cup pellets per 5 lbs of bunny- not to remove all pellets. Does he eat veggies? If so, keep them. If not, I know my vet would have you start adding them slowly right away, although that would be debatable. Changing the diet too much at once can lead to an upset stomach.

    Also, keep in mind that if your rabbits are like Fey and Sprite, it will be a long time before they are recovered. You'll need a diet that is healthy for them in the long term which does require more nutrients than "just hay" can provide.

    It is a great article, but it focuses on only one cause. You'll need to look at the other causes, too.
     
  4. Feb 15, 2006 #4

    Pipp

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    I think in the other post, Petkeepersaid a fecal test was done, came up negative. :)

    Great article, thanks!

    I agree with Naturestee about the pellets, though. If you cut them out altogether, you'll likely need a vitamin supplement. I think it's D (which they get from sun, and I'm assuming your bunnies are indoors) and C that they need (although without high carbs and sugars). Although they may be available through the veggies (assuming your feeding him veggies?).

    Not sure they equal what's found in the pellets, buthere's a site to check for veggienutrients:

    http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

    Did the vet mention the Oxbow Bunny Basic T pellets? They're much higher in fiber, lower in carbs and fat than the others. Personally, I'd try small amounts of those for a couple of weeks.

    Some bunnies have sensitivities, you just have to figure out what they are through experimentation. Thisarticle says itsmost often its the carbs. Good to know. :) Can't go wrong with lowcarbs, high fiber.

    :eats

    Good luck with it!

    SAS :) and PIPP :bunnydance:

     
  5. Feb 15, 2006 #5

    petkeeper

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    In the article from that site and the care sheet...it says to cut out pellets until poop returns to normal then slowly retroduce fresh greens. They don't recommend comercial pellets at all. Rabbits by nature would not eat pellets... it is like everything else, cat food, dog food, canned people food and frozen pizzas, it is all there for our convenience, because it easier than feed raw or all natural and cheaper too.

    I have tried everything else I am going to try this. Yes I did have the fecal tests and they were normal and I was told that maybe the rabbit should be put down.I choose not todo this. Please don't yell at me for this I am doing what I think is best, some of you may not agree with my methods, but for right now this is the way I choose to do it. Harley is not getting the nutrition he needs currently anyway because his night poops are completely unedible, that is my main concern right now is getting him back to normal. It will also help with a healthy weight loss if he is over weight.

    I only posted this because I am hoping maybe this site will help others, it helped me where no vet in my area could! If you read the vets bio, she has dealt with everything dogs, cats, ferrets, rabbits, hedgehogs, etc. I would at this point trust her more than my vets.

    As for pellets where I am from I can get Martins, Purina, Shurgain and Co-op...that is it!

    I will keep you posted.

    Thanks

    Shannon




     
  6. Feb 15, 2006 #6

    Pipp

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    petkeeper wrote:
    LOL! Nobody's going to yell at you, and we're all agreeing with what's in the article. :)I think in every post, thepellets were suspect. The only thing under discussion is the tweaking.

    The pellet/no pellet question has been an argument between vets forages, Susan Brown is a long-standing advocate of that practice.Some vets agree with her, some don't. (You'll find vets out there who will say all they need is pellets). Her articles areprobably half the inspiration for the recent trend to high-fiber pellets.

    The trick is to do what works for YOUR bunny. :) Many bunnies (like mine) are sensitive to carbs and sugars, while someothers can have their systems upset by vegetables.

    The old school thought for pet bunnies is that pellets were good forbreeders and meat producers, not house pets -- which I think is true -- but since then (relatively recently I believe), companies like Oxbow started making the high fiber Timothy pellets (which are actually a mix of grasses), and now Martin makes Kaytee Less Active Timothy Complete -- not as high-fiber as Oxbow, but better than the regular stuff. There'squite adifference between those pellets and regular pellets. This really is an evolving science.

    It depends what your bunny is sensitive to, where you live and what's available in terms of pellets, produce,sun and budget, and even logistics, likewhether you're feeding more than one bunny in the same area.

    If you're planning on feeding him lots of veggies (as the article says), you can do without pellets (you never did say much about veggies in your original post in the other thread, and you said taking awaythe pellets didn't help). But you shouldn'tfeed him only hay without other nutrients. If he's been on a hay-only diet for awhile and you plan on continuing that, that's fine, but as the article says, he'll probablyneed supplements.

    And thank you for being smarter than the vet who suggested putting him down!

    Thanks again for the article! I've read a lot of her work, but lots of stuff in there I forgot about.There's soooo much to learn.

    SAS :)and PIPP :bunnydance:
     
  7. Feb 15, 2006 #7

    TinysMom

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    Pipp wrote:
    At my age....learning isn't hard....

    REMEMBERING IT IS...........:run:

    Peg
     
  8. Feb 15, 2006 #8

    naturestee

    naturestee

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    I'm sorry if it sounded like I was yelling at you.:(

    Pipp wrote some really good advice. I would like to add one thing. From my personal experience, it takes a long time to correct these issues. Even if you change the diet to one that is much better for the rabbit, the improvement may take several weeks to show up. I remember having a pm conversation with another member- we both had rabbits who had been subjected to a particularly bad brand of Walmart rabbit pellets. It took months for our rabbits to get remotely normal, and that was with a good diet and vet support for both of us. So when you try something new, wait for at least 2-4 weeks before you're sure if it's helping or not (although stop immediately if the condition gets worse).
     
  9. Feb 15, 2006 #9

    petkeeper

    petkeeper

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    That is okay I didn't mean to sound snotty!! I am just so tired. This has been very stressful on me and today he had only runny poops with no sign of solids...so I have to wait the day out and see if he has some solids too. Otherwise that is going to be a bad thing :(.

    Keep your fingers crossed for me and Harley I hope it all works out in the end.

    Shannon
     
  10. Feb 16, 2006 #10

    RO STAFF 2

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    You have other rabbits, right? Have you tried givingHarley their cecals?
     
  11. Feb 16, 2006 #11

    doodle

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    RO STAFF 2 wrote:
    I have often read this, but I wonder how you do this if your other rabbits don't have any "leftovers?"

    Petkeepr, I don't know if you might have already tried this, but when my bunny had mushy poops, Benebac helped her a lot. It's supposed to restore beneficial bacteria, and it seemed to work.

    Hope your bunny gets better soon. :hug:
     
  12. Feb 16, 2006 #12

    Pet_Bunny

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    I've been following this post.

    Pebbles had soft stools on Saturday. It was like pudding, and I had to give her a butt bath.

    I cut out the vegetables on Sunday and she was fine.

    On Monday with vegetables, she had soft stool.

    So Tuesday no vegetables and she was fine.

    Wednesday, just parsley and again some soft stool.

    Tomorrow I will try with just cilantro.

    On days when she was fine, I fed her Oxbow BB/T, hay, pumpkin, oats, and papaya tablets.

    Rainbows! :)
     
  13. Feb 16, 2006 #13

    Pipp

    Pipp

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    doodle wrote:
    With Pipp, I end up with her cecals two ways -- one, I 'surprise' her just as she's bending down for a 'munch'... or right around her normal cecal time, I let her run around outside the foster bun's door, and she will immediately mark territory with every little bit of everythingshe can squeeze out of her little body, cecal'sbeing the first in line, intentional or not.

    SAS:disgustand PIPP :yuck
     
  14. Feb 16, 2006 #14

    JimD

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    Pipp wrote:
    :vomit:
     
  15. Feb 16, 2006 #15

    naturestee

    naturestee

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    I tried feeding a cecal to Fey when she had diarrhea from her antibiotics. That was the only time I have ever seen Sprite leave a cecal- I thought it was heaven sent! Unfortunately, Fey did not.:yuck So I tried mixing it with pumpkin to fool her into eating it... didn't work. And it looked really gross!
     
  16. Feb 16, 2006 #16

    Krissa

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    I dont know if you have tried this, but my rabbit, Merry, had very messy stools when I first got her. I switched her to timothy hay based food but it didnt change until I went to the vet. The vet gave me some pills with active bacteria culture in them to fix her GI track.

    The pills were labled as "Acidophilus Tab" they were gel caps so I had to cut a hole in them and squirt it into her mouth (not a happy bunny). One pill a day for a week cleared it up. The vet said that the normal flora of her gut (the bacteria that lives there) may have been upset by stress. She has had great poops ever since.

    Hope this helps.

     
  17. Feb 16, 2006 #17

    Maureen Las

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    Bene-bac is lactobacillus. I did read an article that said that it is not effective in restoring balance in the microorganisms in the GI tract,however I bought some in tiny tubes at Pet-co (gel you can sqeeze in their mouths) and tried it and I think that it has helped several of my bunnies. The article said that lactobacillus breaks down in the stomach before it get into the intestinal tract so couldn't be effective but I figured it wouldn't hurt them. and it didn't
     

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