Small black irregular poops

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fofofina23

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I recently got a rabbit from a pet store, poor little guy had been there for months and the cage was incredibly small. I've noticed his poops are smaller, almost black, and not a consistent size or (sometimes) shape. He has a vet appointment soon and I've tried to push hay on him and cut back pellets, made sure to give him a good amount of greens and reasonable treats he's only slightly interested in food as well. He seems mostly fine but I don't think they were feeding him properly there. I just want to see if there are any suggestions on getting his gut health back on track between now and his appointment.
 

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Blue eyes

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Is this a 3rd rabbit or one of the two that you were keeping separate until fixed?

Photos show early signs of GI stress. How old is he and how long have you had him?

If he is new to you, then he should have remained on the same pellets he was being fed at the pet store. Then you can slowly transition him to your preferred pellets by mixing the old with the new over a period of a couple weeks. If he's already eating the new pellets, leave it be. What kind are they and how much is he eating per day?

No new greens for several weeks after he's brought home -- it's too easy to upset their bacterial gut balance. When it does come time to offer greens, only one type should be offered. That one type will be tested. Small amounts offered at first, looking for any change in poos. Gradually offering more of that same type over a period of days if there is no negative reaction or change in poos. Details for how to safely and properly introduce greens can be found at the link below.

No treats whatsoever. Those can wait til months down the road.

Try refreshing the hay throughout the day. If he's refusing and he may sit scrunched in a football position, then you can offer some simethicone (baby gas drops) for pain. That often is enough to get them eating again. Eating gets that gut moving and back to health.

 

fofofina23

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He is the unfixed dwarf from the original questions... We've had him for about 2 weeks, he was at the pet shop for "at least 2 months" and they don't know how old he was, what breed he was, gender or when they got him. Im guessing they got him then he was about 8 weeks (that's how old maude was that's what I'm basing it off of.) I'm guessing he's bout 4 moths old. It seemed like they knew NOTHING about him and bunnies.
I'm glad I asked there was a lot of helpful information. The last couple of days he's been getting a half a cup of red lettuce and spinach mixed together. No negative reactions it seems.... I I bought the only food for rabbits they had there so I believe it's the same they were feeding him..
How would I go about introducing the drops to him and could there be any negative side effects from doing that?
I'm also concerned that he doesn't seem to have much energy, many naps as compared to maude who I've never seen sleep. Binkies are rare
This picture was from before we were keeping them separate.
IMG_20221028_211210.jpg
 

fofofina23

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Is this a 3rd rabbit or one of the two that you were keeping separate until fixed?

Photos show early signs of GI stress. How old is he and how long have you had him?

If he is new to you, then he should have remained on the same pellets he was being fed at the pet store. Then you can slowly transition him to your preferred pellets by mixing the old with the new over a period of a couple weeks. If he's already eating the new pellets, leave it be. What kind are they and how much is he eating per day?

No new greens for several weeks after he's brought home -- it's too easy to upset their bacterial gut balance. When it does come time to offer greens, only one type should be offered. That one type will be tested. Small amounts offered at first, looking for any change in poos. Gradually offering more of that same type over a period of days if there is no negative reaction or change in poos. Details for how to safely and properly introduce greens can be found at the link below.

No treats whatsoever. Those can wait til months down the road.

Try refreshing the hay throughout the day. If he's refusing and he may sit scrunched in a football position, then you can offer some simethicone (baby gas drops) for pain. That often is enough to get them eating again. Eating gets that gut moving and back to health.

Im also unsure of what a football position would look like... He lays on him belly stretched out pretty often or loafs
 

fofofina23

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Update: did a heck ton of research on gi stasis and what I can do to help. Tomorrow I'm going to grab some interesting hays to entice him to eat it and maybe Bunny fiber supplement. Gave him just a little bit of a Advil, and infant gas stuff. We saw massaging his stomach would be helpful and I think we got at least one successful toot. Encouraging movement as much as possible because he's still eating and fairly active. Refilled his bottle and his water bowl (bowl with a little added sugar because I feel like he really doesn't drink enough and I read that can get them to)
Any other suggestions?
I recently got a rabbit from a pet store, poor little guy had been there for months and the cage was incredibly small. I've noticed his poops are smaller, almost black, and not a consistent size or (sometimes) shape. He has a vet appointment soon and I've tried to push hay on him and cut back pellets, made sure to give him a good amount of greens and reasonable treats he's only slightly interested in food as well. He seems mostly fine but I don't think they were feeding him properly there. I just want to see if there are any suggestions on getting his gut health back on track between now and his appointment
 

Plumpedbunny

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Keep him on the same pellets then slowly ween him off them onto something healthy but lay off any greens for now. Give him plenty of hay. Hay makes up 80% of there diet and will really help him out with digestion. I am against pet shops selling rabbits because there always kept in hamster cages for months often with saw dust or wood shavings and some cheap pellet food. Pet store owners often don't have much of a clue on rabbits and are obtained from rabbit breeders. There are enough rabbits in shelters needing homes. Anyway good on you for saving him from the pet store and finding him vet care.

Do not give him any sugar. Just keep him in a space where he can run about and get him some hay.
 
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