Slaughterhouse Rabbits

Discussion in 'Bunny Chat' started by Mr Philadelphia, Jan 4, 2019.

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  1. Jan 4, 2019 #1

    Mr Philadelphia

    Mr Philadelphia

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    Hello all my name is Robert. I am from Philadelphia. Unfortunately there are many small mom and pop slaughterhouses here in Philadelphia. Yesterday I went to one ad bought two rabbits. They seem skittish (can you blame them) but healthy. I'm sure slaughterhouse buns aren't in the best health but I'm hoping with some love and determination i can turn that around. Has anyone here even done anything similar? How did it turn out?
     
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  2. Jan 4, 2019 #2

    Nancy McClelland

    Nancy McClelland

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    All of ours were shelter rescues--some were fine to start with and some took time to come around--time and patience seems to be the key with almost all bunnies.
     
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  3. Jan 4, 2019 #3

    SableSteel

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    Meat rabbits are quite usually pretty healthy, if they come from somebody who knows anything about rabbits; unhealthy rabbits don't have good growth rate so there's a good incentive for farmers to keep them in top health. Temperament, on the other hand; I doubt they were much handled or socialized. It's pretty common for people to buy young meat rabbits and raise them as pets. And they probably are young; most rabbits are slaughtered between 8-10 weeks old at about 5-5.5 lbs.
     
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  4. Jan 4, 2019 #4

    Mr Philadelphia

    Mr Philadelphia

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    Here they are.. "Jack Frost" and "Mr Mittens". Had them both for about 24 hours now. They are both simular in color, Mr Mittens has color on both feet Jack Frost has color on just one foot. They are starting to really come around. Eating well and seems like they know they are not going to be slaughtered. I'm guessing they are brothers... Anyone know what kinda Rabbits they are? They now have a bunch of REW rabbits there very tempted to save one more. received_2209925432371794.jpeg received_353097025505456.jpeg
     
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  5. Jan 4, 2019 #5

    SableSteel

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    They look like Californian rabbits (also likely could be Californian x New Zealand White crosses)
    The markings tend to change and get darker as they age/with the weather by the way, getting darker larger markings in the winter/cold
     
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  6. Jan 4, 2019 #6

    Blue eyes

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    That's great that you've taken these two in. Just bear in mind that for 2 males to get along past puberty, they almost always need to be neutered. There is no guarantee, though, that they will continue to get along even after their neuter. The neutering just increases their chances by ridding them of those pesky hormones.

    Having a trio is not unheard of but can be quite difficult (sometimes impossible) to achieve. Usually the rare groupings that do work out are either all female or have just one male. Since you already presumably have 2 males, adding a 3rd may be rather difficult or outright impossible to bond all three together. (Baby 'bonds' don't count.)
     
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  7. Jan 4, 2019 #7

    Mr Philadelphia

    Mr Philadelphia

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    Thank you so much for the info... Have you ever kept californian rabbits? Are they pretty socialable?
     
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  8. Jan 4, 2019 #8

    Blue eyes

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    Most all of my rabbits have been mixed breed rabbits from rescues. I have never seen consistency in temperament in any particular breed of rabbit. Each individual seems unique and their personality seems to have little to do with breed type. The various breeds were mostly developed for appearance, not for a particular personality.

    I've seen, for example, a mini-lop that was shy and withdrawn, one that was outgoing, one that craved attention-- all totally different.
     
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  9. Jan 4, 2019 #9

    SableSteel

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    Temperament varies a lot from line to line. It does definitely vary by breed as well; flemish are usually calm, himalayans are usually friendly, britannia petites are usually mean little things. Pet lines of a certain breed are often mixed with something else and/or not selected much for temperament and so the temperament varies wildy. Only in the pedigreed purebreds, usually the show lines, do you see much consistency in temperament and even then it varies by lines sometimes. The entire reason I raise Himalayans is for their wonderful temperaments. Not all breeds, but many breeds, are also bred for that temperament; the britannia petites need to be alert to show well, angoras need to calm to allow for grooming, himalayans breeders don't generally tolerate aggression, and running breeds are bred to be active. The californians I've met have all been rather laid back, not friendly but not mean either. They do vary a lot though, because most people raising them for meat don't care about or select for temperament too much.
     
  10. Jan 4, 2019 #10

    Binky

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    THANK YOU for saving those bunnies!
    Our son saved a slaughterhouse escapee years ago. The vet estimated his age at around 6 months. He grew into a very big bunny...over 12 lbs! I am happy to report that escapee Charlie is now coming up on his 12th birthday! He is the most loving, sweetest, funniest, most adorable rabbit ever! The best way to describe him is as a "Dog-Bunny." His routine includes an early morning patrol of the house (we hear him coming down the hall), lots of cuddle 'n kiss time (Charlie is giving our younger son some love in the attached photo), and keeping his two 'charges' (Netherland Dwarf rescues) in line. Oh, and he always 'helps' me during clean-up of his room (He picks up and tosses his toys while I sweep/vacuum). I hope your bunnies will bring you as much fun and love!
    IMG_0862.JPG
     
  11. Jan 6, 2019 #11

    Mr Philadelphia

    Mr Philadelphia

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    Thank you guys so much for the positive vibes and great feedback
     
  12. Jan 6, 2019 #12

    Imbrium

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    ^ THIS. Most vets will neuter as soon as the testicles descend (usually in the 3-6 month range). Males, unlike females, don't really need to be neutered for health reasons... but behavioral reasons are another matter entirely.

    First, for two rabbits to be safely bonded as adults, they really need to both be altered. If their hormones kick in before they're neutered and they start to fight, they'll have to be separated until the hormones are gone (this can take as much as 6-8 weeks in males) and then bonded back together.

    Secondly, unneutered male rabbits tend to spray pee. They can spray it a good 6 feet in the air and they really like to aim for your eyes.

    Unless you're able and willing to commit to the possibility of housing your rabbits separately if trio bonding doesn't work out, I wouldn't take the risk (at least just yet). I recommend seeing how your current two weather their "teenage years" and come out bonded on the other side before considering adding a third rabbit to the mix.

    Oh, and your rabbits are SO freaking adorable! I just want to scoop them up and hug the heck out of them!
     
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  13. Jan 18, 2019 #13

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    I had two Californians given to me and they were very friendly once they came out of their "shell".
     
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  14. Jan 19, 2019 #14

    katlupe

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    My bunny, "Rabbit" is a Californian and has a great personality and is easy to care for. He was being raised for meat I am pretty sure. An owl kindly dropped him near my house 4 years ago and I found him in my barn. He is neutered and now lives with me in an apartment. He is very healthy and even when he was in my barn he took care of his owl wounds himself because it took me awhile to catch him and bring him inside. I think it is a wonderful thing you did, saving your buns' lives that way.
     
  15. Jan 20, 2019 #15

    leighann7

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    Tawny was a meat bunny. Now she's a sleep on the bed eat all the peppers in the fridge bunny. She was healthy enough when I got her, just skittish. Which changed the moment I put her down in the living room. She joined the family like a champ.
     
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