should i spay ?

Rabbits Online Forum

Help Support Rabbits Online Forum:

jude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Messages
59
Reaction score
6
Location
Jordan
is it really necessary to spay rabbit ?
i heard that 60% can get uterus cancer and die at age of 3
any experiences here??
i feel that a operation would harm her and she wouldn't trust us anymore
and how much would take her to recover from the operation if occurred?
 

MiniLopMad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
546
Reaction score
112
Location
NSW, Australia
Spaying doesn't only prevent uterine cancer, it also prevents unwanted behaviours (false pregnancy, grumpiness, destructive behaviours, etc.)

It'll also stop your rabbit from having babies and make her much easier to bond with another rabbit in the future.

I'm not too sure about recovery times, but it might vary from rabbit to rabbit :)
 

ilovepets

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2011
Messages
235
Reaction score
34
Location
Massachusetts, USA
YES!!! get them spayed :) it really does help with the litter box. when my rabbit became mature, she was peeing everywhere. i got her spayed and it stopped. this was when she was just old enough to be spayed, and now she just turned 4 years old in july! her recovery was fast and she didn't hate me at all. this was a while ago, but from what i remember, the day of, she was kind of sleepy/loopy and next thing i remember, she was back to her old self (the fun kind, not the pee-everywhere kind). soon after we officially bonded, aka, her running on the floor and me ignoring her and she started coming over to me. we are now the best of friends and she loves to snuggle.

just be sure to find a vet who specializes in rabbits. i think one of our MSPCAs does low cost clinics. i got it done at the vet and it was pricey, but so worth it.

as for the above post, i wouldn't say it prevents those things, but maybe tones them down a bit, i have a box in my rabbits cage and if i turn it so it is inclosed with a little door rather than if it turn it so its 3 closed sides and a roof, she might drag hay in an make a nest, hence why i don't turn it that way. she does have her days whats she is a little moody, but it is more than likey because i come home smelling like dogs (grooming) i just have to break out the dried apples and she comes running! same with being picked up. sometimes she will let me and other times she doesn't want to be. she always loves sitting on my lap though. she goes though times where she is digging and chewing in her cardboard box and tube all day long (for entertainment purposes, not nesting) and then other times where she doesn't care. as a whole, she isn't much of a chewer compared to intact rabbits. she behaves well when she is upstairs in my room (she has her own room in the cellar). she is good about going in her litter box in my room, sometimes she goes right outside of it. she will start eating the hay near it and then decide to go right outside rather than hopping in! i have a towel down just in case, so its not a big deal. in her room, her litter box is in her cage and she is 100% litter box trained.
 
Last edited:

Kipcha

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
1,532
Reaction score
129
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Yes, I HIGHLY recommend it. Through our rescue, we have seen quite a few cases of uterine cancer, including two that passed away that would have been prevented if they had been spayed sooner.

Just always be sure to get a good, rabbit savvy vet.
 

jude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Messages
59
Reaction score
6
Location
Jordan
The only problem is that in my country having rabbits as pets is not common nor we have a specialized rabbit vet :/ so thats what scares me the most plus she's now 2 months and a half and i decided to do operation around 10 months old, luckily she doesnt start peeing around because mom wont stand it :p
 

mike158

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2015
Messages
21
Reaction score
2
Location
NULL
The first male rabbit I had spayed (well it was actually castrated) after he fathered 3 litters. I took him to the vet (at an animal "clinic") in the afternoon and picked him up the next morning. Withing a week he had developed a urinary track infection, so I took him back and she gave him an injection and a course of antibiotics.
What I will say is that - after the operation and from then onward - he never regained his fully happy demeanor; there was always "something missing" from his life, and at times he would look at me as if to say - well you can imagine.
Some time later, his grand daughter gave birth to twin boys. All was fine and dandy for the first 2 months; then they were continually "bothering" their mother - but not (yet) fighting. By this time, I had changed "vets" to a rabbit doctor at the "animal hospital", so booked to have them both "done".
This time, the whole business (for both of them) was done in under 2 hours and when I collected them they were both fine; one a little drowsy obviously. The doc said I had to bring them back in one week. When I did this, and had a look at each one (in turn) on the operating table, I noticed that they still had their testicles; what the doctor had actually done is what I call a vasectomy!!!
So, if possible DON'T GET YOUR RABBIT CASTRATED; get the other option. They both stopped "bothering" their mum, and were absolutely normal and still very affectionate. However, they started fighting like hell a couple of months later, so I separated them; they live either side of a gate - they can see each other but cannot get close enough to fight.
 

Thumperina

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2012
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
48
Location
, Kansas, USA
topic starter talks about female rabbit.
I am shocked that your bun was "castrated" ! He possible had huge psychological trauma.
 

Akzholedent

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2015
Messages
348
Reaction score
125
Location
West Virginia, USA
To compare my two female bunnies, I have one spayed (Pippi) and one not (yet) (Ellie). Ellie is a vicious little firecracker. When you go to give her food, she lunges at your hands, scratches the crap out of you, growls like crazy... unfortunately, she also has an issue with her ears and needs daily attention, so we have to handle her all the time. One she's out of her cage, she's an angel, but she is verrrrrrrrrrry territorial over her cage. The only reason she hasn't been spayed is because she's currently living at my mom and dad's farm. As soon as I relocate her and Butterscotch to my house, she and Butterscotch will both be taken care of. :)

Pippi isn't exactly the most perfect bunny either, but she isn't as vicious as Ellie. She's a little over enthusiastic about grooming me (which is why I think she needs rabbit friends), and she isn't overly fond of being held, but she is a sweetheart compared to Ellie. Before she was spayed, she was turning into mini-Ellie, and they hadn't met yet..

Butterscotch, my male, is my cuddlebun. He'll snuggle with me for hours, and is much more people-friendly. :) maybe with his influence, Pippi will be too. :)
 

ilovepets

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2011
Messages
235
Reaction score
34
Location
Massachusetts, USA
The first male rabbit I had spayed (well it was actually castrated) after he fathered 3 litters. I took him to the vet (at an animal "clinic") in the afternoon and picked him up the next morning. Withing a week he had developed a urinary track infection, so I took him back and she gave him an injection and a course of antibiotics.
What I will say is that - after the operation and from then onward - he never regained his fully happy demeanor; there was always "something missing" from his life, and at times he would look at me as if to say - well you can imagine.
Some time later, his grand daughter gave birth to twin boys. All was fine and dandy for the first 2 months; then they were continually "bothering" their mother - but not (yet) fighting. By this time, I had changed "vets" to a rabbit doctor at the "animal hospital", so booked to have them both "done".
This time, the whole business (for both of them) was done in under 2 hours and when I collected them they were both fine; one a little drowsy obviously. The doc said I had to bring them back in one week. When I did this, and had a look at each one (in turn) on the operating table, I noticed that they still had their testicles; what the doctor had actually done is what I call a vasectomy!!!
So, if possible DON'T GET YOUR RABBIT CASTRATED; get the other option. They both stopped "bothering" their mum, and were absolutely normal and still very affectionate. However, they started fighting like hell a couple of months later, so I separated them; they live either side of a gate - they can see each other but cannot get close enough to fight.

this sounds like your 'vet' didn't do it right, or wasn't sure of what she was doing :/ i work in a animal shelter and we get adult rabbits spayed/neutered when they come in and they have all been successful. there is also a local rabbit rescue in the area and all of their rabbits are fixed-male/female/youngster... looks like your bun was part of a worst-case scenario :(
 

jude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Messages
59
Reaction score
6
Location
Jordan
Thank you guys alot
Still got plenty time till operation
But my rabbit is a sweatheart and lovable and soi friendly since day one
But what i learnt from you guys is to carefully choose my operating vet hopefully i will find someone specialized in this in my country
 

woahlookitsme

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2009
Messages
4,194
Reaction score
593
Location
, Texas, USA
If you notice unwanted behaviors they will normally start between 4-8 months. Normal age is around 6 mos. Most noticeable unwanted behavior is increased aggression or territorial aggression. If she is spayed this may resolve or lesson this aggression and is the most common reason to spay.

If it is not safe or you are not able to find a vet that you can feel confident about doing the procedure no worries. As long as you are aware of the issues that come with not spaying your bunny.
 

jude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Messages
59
Reaction score
6
Location
Jordan
If you notice unwanted behaviors they will normally start between 4-8 months. Normal age is around 6 mos. Most noticeable unwanted behavior is increased aggression or territorial aggression. If she is spayed this may resolve or lesson this aggression and is the most common reason to spay.

If it is not safe or you are not able to find a vet that you can feel confident about doing the procedure no worries. As long as you are aware of the issues that come with not spaying your bunny.
Thank u thats so helpful !! Thats what i wanted to hear
 

Thumperina

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2012
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
48
Location
, Kansas, USA
Thank you guys alot
Still got plenty time till operation
But my rabbit is a sweatheart and lovable and soi friendly since day one
But what i learnt from you guys is to carefully choose my operating vet hopefully i will find someone specialized in this in my country
I can tell you what the problem is... I have 2 unspayed females. ages 3 and 3.5 years.
I don;t have any complains about behavior/ But I think they both are deeply unhappy that they aren;t allowed to mother any kits.
One of them was a mother once, but this is it. Her daughter haven't had a male who is able to make her pregnant. I am sure they are both rather unhappy.
Plus, I am really concerned about cancer.
 

mike158

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2015
Messages
21
Reaction score
2
Location
NULL
Anyone know why they aren't displaying my profile picture (of my rabbit - 62.5 kb)? It appears on MY profile, but is not displayed on the left side of my posts?
 

Thumperina

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2012
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
48
Location
, Kansas, USA
Anyone know why they aren't displaying my profile picture (of my rabbit - 62.5 kb)? It appears on MY profile, but is not displayed on the left side of my posts?
I think your rabbit could be too big for the small avatar pic :)))
 

jude

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Messages
59
Reaction score
6
Location
Jordan
I can tell you what the problem is... I have 2 unspayed females. ages 3 and 3.5 years.
I don;t have any complains about behavior/ But I think they both are deeply unhappy that they aren;t allowed to mother any kits.
One of them was a mother once, but this is it. Her daughter haven't had a male who is able to make her pregnant. I am sure they are both rather unhappy.
Plus, I am really concerned about cancer.
So if never been pregnant or mated she would be unhappy ?? :(
 

BlazeBunnies

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2015
Messages
678
Reaction score
116
Location
NSW Australia
It doesn't matter if they can't mother a litter.... She will be fine if she hasn't and plus most rabbits are happy without mothering litters! Some of my does have been happy all their life and haven't mothered a litter :)!
 

mike158

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2015
Messages
21
Reaction score
2
Location
NULL
Got it! The "Edit Profile pic" didn't work, but the "Edit Avatar" worked: thanks very much.
 
Top