Should I Spay My Two Bunnies?

Help Support RabbitsOnline:

Kat Lust

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Location
Washington, USA
Hi everyone, still a bit new and I was hoping for some advice. I have two buns and they are littermates, both female, and they are 3 months old. I know since they are female I don't have to worry about reproduction between them, but would you still recommend getting them spayed? I've heard that it may help with behavioral or health stuff, although there doesn't seem to be any negatives to their behavior. They get along great, they never fight, they are always sharing and playing and cuddling with one another, and they are potty trained pretty good by now. Some accidents around the litter box but it is mainly just droppings. And their behavior around me is pretty good too. I've had them for a month and they let me pet them, feel comfortable to play and relax around me, they don't mind hopping up to me and don't panic when they see me, and they've even felt comfortable to hop onto my bed and do some more exploring there. So with all of that, should I still get them spayed for any health reasons that might play a part, or just leave them be?
 

Attachments

zuppa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
1,963
Reaction score
1,303
Location
NULL
I'd say don't fix if not broken but at 3 months they are still very young and if the problems arise later you will see if you want to spay them. One of my lop girls Bernie is one year old and I have no problem with her I wouldn't spay her to fix her behaviour. some people say that spaying prevents uterine cancer in female rabbits but there's also a risk that they could die during surgery, I see threads about it too often lately, unfortunately.
 

Kat Lust

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Location
Washington, USA
I'd say don't fix if not broken but at 3 months they are still very young and if the problems arise later you will see if you want to spay them. One of my lop girls Bernie is one year old and I have no problem with her I wouldn't spay her to fix her behaviour. some people say that spaying prevents uterine cancer in female rabbits but there's also a risk that they could die during surgery, I see threads about it too often lately, unfortunately.
It feels like taking a bit of a risk either way, but I agree, they are still pretty young right now and will probably go through changes as they get older. What age do you think would be best to decide if I should get them spayed, if any problems arise in their behavior?
 

TreasuredFriend

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
1,931
Reaction score
169
Location
Kindness Matters - Waukesha, WI, ,
Have you googled for information on the pros and cons of spaying female rabbits? Our rescued girls from a horse-farm litter that was going to be euthanized at the shelter due to overpopulation at the shelter at the time, began fighting with their mother, plus bickering, dominance mounting, biting, etc. at around 4 months of age. They needed to be separated to avoid injuries or wounds. 3 months old is young yet, but you'll recognize the dominance mounting soon. 5 to 5 1/2 months is the ideal age to spay, according to numerous articles. rabbit.org | myhouserabbit.com | mncompanionrabbit.org |

rabbitadvocates.org | this group is located in Oregon and you can consult with them -- Hope the internet links help.
 

TreasuredFriend

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
1,931
Reaction score
169
Location
Kindness Matters - Waukesha, WI, ,
Yes, getting them spayed will reduce their risk of getting uterine cancer and the obnoxious female maturity hormones that could or will cause fighting. Recently several friends noted the efforts taken to save female rabbits with uterine cancer prognosis. Seeing the pictures of the cancerous-afflicted uterus was very sad. Could have been prevented, if only people did research and talked to their rabbit-savvy DVM.
 

Kat Lust

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Location
Washington, USA
Have you googled for information on the pros and cons of spaying female rabbits? Our rescued girls from a horse-farm litter that was going to be euthanized at the shelter due to overpopulation at the shelter at the time, began fighting with their mother, plus bickering, dominance mounting, biting, etc. at around 4 months of age. They needed to be separated to avoid injuries or wounds. 3 months old is young yet, but you'll recognize the dominance mounting soon. 5 to 5 1/2 months is the ideal age to spay, according to numerous articles. rabbit.org | myhouserabbit.com | mncompanionrabbit.org |

rabbitadvocates.org | this group is located in Oregon and you can consult with them -- Hope the internet links help.
I have seen one of my girls lay down right under the nose of the other one, and then the other would proceed to lick the one who layed down. I did some research and found out that the one laying down is the dominate rabbit and she is basically demanding love and worship from the other one. It has never gotten agressive, though. But I'll keep an eye out for signs. I'm just afraid that if I spay them when their behavior is good, it will make them change their behavior for the worse.
 

Blue eyes

Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
7,391
Reaction score
3,726
Location
Arizona, USA
I'm just afraid that if I spay them when their behavior is good, it will make them change their behavior for the worse.
That can be deceptive. Rabbits can change in personality with the onset of adulthood and hormones. What often happens is that the timing for neuter surgery coincides with their becoming adults. So one may have the surgery performed and then erroneously conclude that the surgery altered their behavior when, in fact, it was simply the transition to adulthood that caused the change.

Babies typically get along. Many assume this means they are officially bonded, but that isn't true. It is certainly possible that they could remain bonded as they transition to adulthood but it is also possible that they will begin to fight. Only time will tell. Hormones affect different rabbits to varying degrees. If they begin fighting, then you'll likely have no choice but to spay them. Once spayed, the bonding process would begin anew -- as if they had never before met. They may bond; they may not.

A key factor in survival rates with spaying is the experience of the vet. If you decide to spay, be sure to get a rabbit savvy vet -- not just one that says they 'treat rabbits.'
 

Kat Lust

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Location
Washington, USA
That can be deceptive. Rabbits can change in personality with the onset of adulthood and hormones. What often happens is that the timing for neuter surgery coincides with their becoming adults. So one may have the surgery performed and then erroneously conclude that the surgery altered their behavior when, in fact, it was simply the transition to adulthood that caused the change.

Babies typically get along. Many assume this means they are officially bonded, but that isn't true. It is certainly possible that they could remain bonded as they transition to adulthood but it is also possible that they will begin to fight. Only time will tell. Hormones affect different rabbits to varying degrees. If they begin fighting, then you'll likely have no choice but to spay them. Once spayed, the bonding process would begin anew -- as if they had never before met. They may bond; they may not.

A key factor in survival rates with spaying is the experience of the vet. If you decide to spay, be sure to get a rabbit savvy vet -- not just one that says they 'treat rabbits.'
True, I know I will need to be careful when it comes to spaying them and choosing wisely with the vet. I think I'll let them get a bit older and see how they do with each other, but if it would definitely help prevent uterine cancer and help keep them bonded, it seems like it's something that would be good to do
 

John Wick

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
221
Reaction score
122
Location
United States
It's a valid concern - not wanting bad behaviors to come from a spay (or neuter)

Thankfully, that rarely happens when the operation is done by an experienced rabbit vet and the post-op recovery goes smoothly,to my knowledge. Especially thinking long-term.

The "bad" behaviors rabbit owners talk about are typically aggression, destruction, and not being litter box adherent. All of these behaviors can have very close ties to the rabbit's hormone development, so these are the behaviors that typically reduce after a spay/neuter (with exception of a post-op hormone spike which occurs and can make these behaviors worse for about a month; it's natural as the hormones sort themselves out).
 
Top