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Should I get a Holland Lop or a Mini Lop?

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Should I get a Holland Lop or a Mini Lop?

  • Holland Lop

    Votes: 3 60.0%
  • Mini Lop

    Votes: 2 40.0%

  • Total voters
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I am going to be getting a rabbit in a couple months, and I have decided on a lop rabbit. I looked through different lop breeds, and I can't decide between a Holland Lop and a Mini Lop. This is the first rabbit I will be having as a pet. I have three siblings who are pretty young (4, 8, and 11 years old). The rabbit will be living outside. I would like to have whichever rabbit is energetic and fun, but also affectionate. Which breed-- Holland Lop or Mini Lop --would you recommend?
 

Mariam+Theo

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I think Holland because they are smaller, easier to handle, and make great first rabbits!
 

Blue eyes

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A couple considerations. Single rabbits do not do well housed outside. They will spend far too much time without any interaction. This is a big consideration because it means that if you must house outdoors, you will need to get two rabbits. That alone brings up a number of other factors. If you are able to house indoors, then having a single is do-able because the rabbit will (should) be around people most of the time (even if not directly interacting).

If you decide to get two rabbits to house outdoors, then you will need to find an already fixed and already bonded pair. You shouldn't get 2 baby rabbits because they only remain bonded until hormones kick in (age 4 months +). Once hormones kick in, they can turn aggressive and fight viciously. Then they would each have to be fixed. (Female spays are costly. In our area they run $250.) If your parents aren't willing to pay those high vet costs, then the rabbits won't likely bond and then they'd have to be housed separately and you'll be back to the problem of having single rabbits housed outdoors. If your parents are willing to pay the high vet fees for surgery (for both rabbits), then you'll have to go through the bonding process 2 months after their surgery. Whether or not they will bond at that point is anyone's guess.

If you can house indoors, then getting just one rabbit is fine to do. With an indoor rabbit, you will be able to interact more often and build a better bond with your rabbit. You'll also be better positioned to keep a close eye on subtle behavior changes that could indicate a health issue. Rabbits hide sickness, so once something is noticed, immediate action is usually required.

If you do get one rabbit, then it is recommended to get one that is already fixed. It will make ownership so much more enjoyable and less stressful. A baby is stressful, frustrating, expensive (vet fees), and in no way helps you to bond any better with him. (I realize that sounds contradictory, but is the way it is with rabbits.)

So to your question of which rabbit type to get.... if you go with a fixed rabbit, you will be able to see their temperament and find the right rabbit for you. You can meet the individual rabbits and see which one seems to like you and vice versa. Some rabbits may not like a certain person and you won't want to have that. Don't choose strictly on breed type. Rather, choose based on individual personality of the rabbit. It is so much fun to go to a rabbit rescue and see which rabbit is the right match for you. The personality is going to be the most important factor. After all, rabbits can live over 10 years, so you want to make the right choice.

That's a lot of info I just threw on you:D, but hopefully it will help you as you consider not just what rabbit to get, but how many, where to get them, and where to house them.
For more information on housing rabbits indoors, you can check my website here:

You might also want to take a peek at different indoor housing setups at the following link on this forum:

For a guide to outdoor housing, check the following link on this forum. The normal hutches you see in stores or online are usually far too small for properly keeping a rabbit.
 
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Blue eyes

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(Just so you know, I am planning on getting two rabbits)

Okay. Then I'll post the relevant part of what I wrote earlier. ;)

If you decide to get two rabbits to house outdoors, then you will need to find an already fixed and already bonded pair. You shouldn't get 2 baby rabbits because they only remain bonded until hormones kick in (age 4 months +). Once hormones kick in, they can turn aggressive and fight viciously. Then they would each have to be fixed. (Female spays are costly. In our area they run $250.) If your parents aren't willing to pay those high vet costs, then the rabbits won't likely bond and then they'd have to be housed separately and you'll be back to the problem of having single rabbits housed outdoors. If your parents are willing to pay the high vet fees for surgery (for both rabbits), then you'll have to go through the bonding process 2 months after their surgery. Whether or not they will bond at that point is anyone's guess.

Babies are also stressful, frustrating, expensive (vet fees), and in no way help you to bond any better with them. (I realize that sounds contradictory, but is the way it is with rabbits.)
 

Blue eyes

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There are 72 available rabbits at the following rescue:
 

zuppa

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(Just so you know, I am planning on getting two rabbits)
Hi, I would completely understand if all the information and suggestions Blue eyes sent you is not what you expected and you are maybe feeling strange right now but I can say the same thing just in a few words. If you are first time rabbit lover and have no experience I wouldn't suggest getting baby or two babies especially to live outdoors, you will get 8 week rabbits from a breeder and they will be happy go lucky fuzzballs for 3-4 up to 6 weeks after, then they will enter teenage phase and you will have to separate them and all as Blue eyes described, otherwise they will fight to blood or spray your walls with urine marking territory or will hump each other, and if they are different sexes girl will get pregnant at 4 months so you will have to deal with babies after just 30 days, there can be 4-14 babies and as you have no experience with babies also housed outdoors then search this forum and you will see that there's high volume of threads when people asking for help with surprise first litters and unfortunately very many babies die because of no experience and unsuitable environment food etc. So do not put yourself into a tight spot and best thing you could do just check your local rescues they have websites and you will be surprised how many very nice and pretty and health-checked, fixed rabbits you will see there. Just go through all the photo and info on them and see maybe you like a few of them, then contact the rescue and ask if you could visit and ask if you could visit them, explain your situation that you would like to get your first rabbits to keep outdoors, and you can state that you'd like to meet some you like from photos, so when you are there you can meet them and choose (also best way to choose a rabbit is to sit on the floor and see if they will come to you, it will mean that they like you and you have a great chance to become friends). Anyways, you will get lots of advice and assistance from rescue workers, them may have already bonded pair so they won't feel so alone when left in an outdoor hutch for most of time as they will have each other.

That would be my advice, I hope you can get nice rabbits and we will have another happy and loving rabbit person here in our friendly community :)
 

zuppa

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I would also suggest to go not with particular breed but just see in reality and see which rabbits will like you, as you described you have a big family I wouldn't suggest mini breed as they are so tiny and easy to step on when out of hutch so if I'd have to decide between lop and mini lop I'd go with a regular size lop. There are French lops they are a larger breed so maybe go with a holland lop they are medium size. French lops live 6-7 years as larger breeds generally live shorter, Hollands live 10-14 years when you are taking good care of them, it is important to make a good housing for them and keep their diet healthy and don't leave them alone for long time as they can get very depressed and get sick and even die of depression. So getting a rabbit is really responsibility but it is very rewarding as rabbits are amazing creatures they are very intelligent and can become your best friends
 
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I would also suggest to go not with particular breed but just see in reality and see which rabbits will like you, as you described you have a big family I wouldn't suggest mini breed as they are so tiny and easy to step on when out of hutch so if I'd have to decide between lop and mini lop I'd go with a regular size lop. There are French lops they are a larger breed so maybe go with a holland lop they are medium size. French lops live 6-7 years as larger breeds generally live shorter, Hollands live 10-14 years when you are taking good care of them, it is important to make a good housing for them and keep their diet healthy and don't leave them alone for long time as they can get very depressed and get sick and even die of depression. So getting a rabbit is really responsibility but it is very rewarding as rabbits are amazing creatures they are very intelligent and can become your best friends
I agree with what your saying about not getting a small breed. But, I just wanted to say that Mini lops are actually bigger than Holland lops. Holland lops are the smallest lop breed. Not by much though. I have 2 Holland lops right now. Thumper is about 4 pounds, and he is a little over a year old. My other lop doesn't have a name yet. Because I'm indecisive....She's so cute! :) She is 3 pounds at 12 weeks old.

Holland lops should weigh no more than 4 pounds. But, that's if your looking into showing them. Holland lops can have a dwarf gene, and that's what makes them weigh so little. Holland lops are considered a dwarf breed. They can also be whats called a false dwarf. That's where they weigh more because they didn't receive a copy of the dwarf gene from a parent. My old bunny Lopsie was a false dwarf. He was around 5 pounds. (But he wasn't a mini lop) Its confusing lol.

Mini lops should weigh no more than 6 1/2 pounds. But the ideal weight is 5 1/2 pounds. Mini lops have slightly longer ears than Holland lops. Both are adorable though! I think Holland lops are a more popular breed and easier to find. But, I could be wrong.
 
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