Separated bunnies - how separated?

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Hello 👋
I’ve written in before, have 3 young female bunnies from the same litter - have had to separate 1 because she fights the other two (too young to spay, 4 months old, so at the moment she’s in a cage alone)

They’re all indoors actually - and in a c&c cage right next to each other. Is this okay? Or should she be in a totally different room?

They seem okay through the wire - however any access they get to each other outside in the house they still scuffle.

Im still naively hopefully I have chances of bonding this 3rd one in after they’re spayed 🥴 but maybe I can’t?
 

JBun

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If they don't try and bite each other through the bars, they may be ok staying next to each other. The biggest risk is that a nose or ear gets bitten. If they don't act aggressively through the bars, but you're concerned they could bite, you could set up pen panels spaced at least a couple of inches apart to prevent biting through the bars.

If they rile each other up and act aggressively through the bars when they see each other, it would be best to put them in separate rooms, especially if you're wanting to try and bond them once spayed. You basically want them to forget that they don't like the other rabbit. You definitely need to prevent any access they get to each other, and any possible scuffles, as this will just reinforce their dislike of the other rabbit, and will affect any possibility of bonding. But if they're ok being next to each other, this can be good in helping them get used to each others presence and scent. So it all depends on their reactions towards one another through the pen bars.

You just never really know with bonding until they're spayed and have had several weeks for the hormones to die down. So they could bond just fine, or they may still hate each other. If they're both pretty dominant females, that's usually not a compatible match, but there's always a chance.
 
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If they don't try and bite each other through the bars, they may be ok staying next to each other. The biggest risk is that a nose or ear gets bitten. If they don't act aggressively through the bars, but you're concerned they could bite, you could set up pen panels spaced at least a couple of inches apart to prevent biting through the bars.

If they rile each other up and act aggressively through the bars when they see each other, it would be best to put them in separate rooms, especially if you're wanting to try and bond them once spayed. You basically want them to forget that they don't like the other rabbit. You definitely need to prevent any access they get to each other, and any possible scuffles, as this will just reinforce their dislike of the other rabbit, and will affect any possibility of bonding. But if they're ok being next to each other, this can be good in helping them get used to each others presence and scent. So it all depends on their reactions towards one another through the pen bars.

You just never really know with bonding until they're spayed and have had several weeks for the hormones to die down. So they could bond just fine, or they may still hate each other. If they're both pretty dominant females, that's usually not a compatible match, but there's always a chance.

oh thanks so much! They’re perfectly lovely through bars - sleep next to each other on the wire (it’s just when they’re out roaming they’re fighting)
They haven’t intentionally been put together for over a month - one just broke down a barrier between rooms and it happened again.
the guilt of keeping 1 alone wrecks me - but she’s getting out a lot and has a large space inside

thanks again
 

JBun

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That's good they aren't aggressive through the bars. Though just be aware, rabbits laying next to each other on the opposite sides of their fencing/barrier, doesn't always mean they're doing it because they like each other or want to be near the other rabbit. Sometimes it's done as an insult to the other rabbit, or it can be a territorial guarding behavior.


There is still hope for bonding. And she is next to them, so not completely alone. You're just keeping them all safe for now, until you can get them spayed. It's a normal process that has to be done when you have adolescent rabbits, so nothing to feel guilty about.
 
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That's good they aren't aggressive through the bars. Though just be aware, rabbits laying next to each other on the opposite sides of their fencing/barrier, doesn't always mean they're doing it because they like each other or want to be near the other rabbit. Sometimes it's done as an insult to the other rabbit, or it can be a territorial guarding behavior.


There is still hope for bonding. And she is next to them, so not completely alone. You're just keeping them all safe for now, until you can get them spayed. It's a normal process that has to be done when you have adolescent rabbits, so nothing to feel guilty about.
Ohhh gosh haha 😆
I have so so much to learn - Rabbits are way more complicated than the dogs I’ve owned 😂😳
Thanks for the info - I will keep reading that link!
 

Blue eyes

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Also, keep an eye on the two that are still together as they may also become aggressive with each other as hormones activate. If so, then they may also have to be separated until spayed.
 
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Also, keep an eye on the two that are still together as they may also become aggressive with each other as hormones activate. If so, then they may also have to be separated until spayed.
Thanks!
how do you know when it’s too much?
Today one of the pair constantly chasing the other and humping her - but no fur pulling, no aggression. Clearly the passive one doesn’t like it because she’s running away a lot - but is this something that needs intervening in?
 

JBun

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When the humping is unrelenting, the other rabbit may tolerate it to begin with, but can get fed up with it happening so much, and lash out, or it can make her become afraid of the other rabbit. So you may need to separate them as well. If you don't right away, I would make sure she at least has lots of small hidey holes and small shelves, that only one rabbit can fit on(or in), so that she can escape the constant pestering.

I can't say if they'll be fine or not. It's an unknown. It just depends on the rabbit and how she decides to react. So there is a risk she could react negatively to the constant humping, especially if she isn't able to find a space to get away from it.
 

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